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December 16, 1988 - Image 78

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS 1

More Soviet Jews
May Enter the U.S.

It's a special time of the week when families
gather, traditions are renewed and there's
plenty of time to relax and enjoy the rich,
delicious taste of Maxwell House® Coffee.

GENERAL
FOODS

g

1988 General Foods Corporation

Maxwell House® Coffee. Always ... Good to the Last Drop:



CC

LLI

YOUR CLEANERS • YOUR CLEANERS

"YOUR"

CLEANERS OF FARMINGTON HILLS

0
CC

0
>-





0

0

We just dropped all our
clothes off at "YOUR"
Cleaners to get their
special prices.



Men's or Ladies'

0

SUITS

C

33

SHIRTS



expires 12/29/88

0
'C

YOUR CLEANERS • YOUR CLEANERS

78

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1988

Orchard Lake Road • North of Maple

851-7727

Send it for Less
at ...

Cl

'Wei

6453 FARMINGTON ROAD
W. BLOOMFIELD

851-7172

29571 Orchard Lake Rd.
Farmington Hills

WEST BLOOMFIELD • MICHIGAN

0

Hours: 7 a.m.-7 p.m. M-F • 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.

NEXT TO GREAT SCOTT
13 Mile & Orchard Lake Rd.

1 1

IP

Professional Laundered

65c



06.6. ID

$5.50

(no pleats or whites
excludes other specials)

(on hangers only)

Opening
this month
Jigsaw
and
R.I.K.'s The Restaurant



855-5822

Washington (JTA) — At-
torney General Richard
Thornburgh took steps
recently to allow up to 2,000
Soviet emigres to enter the
United States each month on
the attorney general's parole
authority, including all
Jewish emigrants now in
Rome.
In addition, the Justice
Department will allow "im-
migrant class" entry to a
"limited number of ap-
plicants who face special cir-
cumstances?'
Thornburgh announced
this interim measure in
response to a request from
Secretary of State George
Shultz that something be
done to help Soviet citizens
unable to get visas to the
United States because of the
U.S. budget crunch.
Since September, about 179
Soviet Jews have been strand-
ed in Rome because they have
been denied refugee status,
which would automatically
allow them entry to the
United States. Another 345
have been waiting a ruling on
their status.
Sheppy Abramowitz, a
State Department spokesman
on refugee affairs, said all
Soviet Jews stranded in Rome
could come on parole status.
She also noted that 93 per-
cent of Jews who left Soviet
Union in the last three
months have come on the nor-
mal refugee status.
Also since July, a lack of
funds has left the U.S. Em-
bassy in Moscow unable to
process applicants for visas,
mostly Armenians, but some
Jews. The embassy had decid-
ed not to process additional
Soviet applicants until
January.
Thornburgh also ordered
Alan Nelson, commissioner of
the U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service, to
take immediate steps to place
a Russian speaker at the
Moscow Embassy to help ad-
judicate some of the backlog
of emigration cases.
As a long-term measure, the
Justice Department's Office

of Legislative Affairs will
work with the State Depart-
ment to develop a legislative
strategy to address the pro-
blem, Thornburgh said.
The attorney general's
order was announced two
days after Shultz met with a
delegation of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
The secretary promised at the
meeting that the government
will work with the Jewish
community to resolve the
problem.
Jews entering the United
States as refugees receive
government aid for traveling
and resettlement. But when
Jews come to the United
States under the parole
authority, these expenses are
picket up by the Jewish com-
munity in which they settle.



Shamir: No
Talk With PLO

1bl Aviv (JTA) - Israel is
ready to talk peace with its
Arab neighbors, but never
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization, Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir said last
week.
Shamir accused the West-
ern powers of being taken in
by PLO leader Yassir Arafat.
In a blistering speech at the
opening session of the fourth
annual Jeanne Kirkpatrick
Forum at Tel Aviv University,
Shamir charged that Arafat
surpassed Nazi propaganda
minister Joseph Goebbels as
a purveyor of the "Big Lie."
The prime minister said he
does not believe Arafat or any
PLO spokesman who says he
recognizes Israel and accept
Security Council Resolutions
242 and 338 as a basis for
negotiations.
Shamir was referring to
positions adopted by the
Palestine National Council,
the PLO's so-called parlia-
ment, at its meeting, in Al-
giers last month, as well as a
statement elaborating on
those positions made by Ara-
fat in Stockholm last week.

Because of upcoming holiday closings, advertising
deadlines for the issues of December 30, 1988, and
January 6, 1989, are being changed.

Display Advertising Deadline
for December 30, 1988 edition:
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 5 P.M.

Display Advertising Deadline
for January 6, 1989 edition:
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 5 P.M.

Thank you for your cooperation.

1

I

41



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