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December 16, 1988 - Image 55

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Discover the Wonder of the
Holidays at Krandalls!

15, a student at North Farm-
ington High School, partici-
pates for the social aspect, but
likes the fact that the
chavurah helps strengthen
her Jewish identity. "I like
learning and maintaining my
Jewish identity, especially
now because I'm in a public
school." Josh Cutler, 16, also
a student at North Farm-
ington, said the chavurah
gave him an opportunity to be
with friends. "I guess I like
being in a Shabbos at-
mosphere back at Hillel with
my friends. It's fun!"
Mark Leuchter, 16, a junior
at West Bloomfield High, said
he got involved because it is
"good for my Hebrew educa-
tion." He said he had fond
memories of his days at Hillel
an he wanted to "keep Hillel
a part of my life." Katzman
said coming back to Hillel
was like being with an ex-
tended family. "It's like corn-
ing home each time you go
there."
Leuchter said he would like
to see programs which focus
on life for Soviet Jews and the
Holocaust. Cutler hoped Rab-
bi Chuck Diamond, a Camp
Ramah rabbi, could be engag-
ed as a speaker. Katzman
would like to have a program
on comparative religions.
Smiley said he hopes the
chavurah will "keep post-
Hillel education in the kids'
minds." And he would like the
Hillel idea to spread to other
Jewish educational institu-
tions. "We hope this is a
model that will be recognized
nationwide?'

Brandeis Teen
Program Due

Waltham, Mass. — Marine
ecology of Cape Cod, the
physics of toys, observing
animal behavior and aero-
dynamics are some of the
science courses offered this
July to 300 talented high
school students through the
newly-established Brandeis
Summer Discoveries
Program.
The four-week residential
program will provide
sophomores, juniors and
seniors with an interest in
science and opportunity to
spend a month in the
laboratories and libraries of a
major 1.-esearch university,
whit' also spending time
behind the scenes at institu-
tions such as the New
England Aquarium, learning
how to design museum ex-
hibits or watching scientists
at an observatory as they
search for extraterrestrials.
The emphasis is on new
topics which have not yet

been incorporated into the
regular high school science
curriculum, in addition to
creative approaches to fun-
damental scientific topics.
Students will have special op-
portunities for hands-on ex-
perience at institutions such
as the New England Primate
Center and the New England
Science Center.
Incoming high school
sophomores, junior and
seniors who have maintained
at least a B average are eligi-
ble to apply for the program
which begins in July. the
$2,095 program fee for 1989
covers all costs, including tui-
tion, textbooks, food, housing,
field trips and recreational ac-
tivities. Applications will be
accepted beginning in Janu-
ary. More information on the
program is available by call-
ing Brandeis University, (617)
736-2112.
In addition to utilizing the
Brandeis libraries and
laboratories, the students will
live on campus and be hous-
ed in supervised dormitories.
Academically-related field
trips are planned to research
sites on Cape Cod, the
Berkshire mountains, and
Boston.

UHS Joins
Values Project
In Washington

The United Hebrew
Schools' Community Jewish
High School will participate
in a special program entitled,
"Panim el Panim: The
Washington Institute for
Jewish Leadership and
Values," Feb. 12-15.
This program is a living
classroom experience for
Jewish high school youth in
the nation's capital. The pro-
gram is designed to enhance
Jewish high school students'
awareness of the leadership
possibilities available to them
in a democracy and to help
them understand and ap-
preciate Judaism's concern
about creating a more just
society.
The four-day session in
Washington, D.C., will pro-
vide an orientation to
American government and
the political process, the
Jewish public policy agenda
and an examination of rele-
vant Jewish texts and values.
The program is politcally non-
partisan and is open to in-
dividuals across the full spec-
trum of religious and cultural
identificaiton.
For registration informa-
tion, contact Rabbi Bruce D.
Aft, principal, 352-7117, by
Jan. 8.

Some special item from our vast inventory will be the perfect solu-
tion to your gift-giving question. Come and enjoy the excitement of
the Holidays in the beauty of our exquisite gems!

Save Up to 40%

DIAMOND JEWELRY

Rings, Bracelets, Earrings & Necklaces

VALUES — $400. to $137.800.

NOW — $240. to $97,750.

PRECIOUS GEMSTONE JEWELRY

Emerald, Sapphire, Ruby and Many Others

-VALUES — $350. to 533.800.

NOW — $225. to $22,000.

PEARL JEWELRY AND NECKLACES

VALUES — $295. to $39,000.

NOW — $175. to $26,000.

DIAMOND STUD EARRINGS

1/5 ct. to 4 ct. Total Wt.

VALUES — $300. to $26,500.

NOW — $190. to $18,500.

INDIVIDUAL DIAMONDS

.36 ct. Round
.52 ct. Marquise
.73 ct. Round
.98 ct. Round
1.18 ct. Round
1.39 ct. Round
2.15 ct. Round
3.05 ct. Pear Shape

VALUE NOW
$650.
$385.
$1,190. $780.
$1,785. $1,160.
$2,730. $1,775.
$3,370. $2,190.
$4,960. $3,470.
$11.450. $6,940.
$22,700 $14,490.

Many of these items are one-of-a-kind. They
are, of course, subject to prior sale.

FOURTH GENERATION JEWELERS

World Headquarters
755 West Big Beaver Road (16 Mile at I-75)
Troy, Michigan 48084 • Phone: (313) 362-4500

Holiday Hours:

Open 9:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Mon. through Fri.,
Sat. 9:30 A.M. to 7:00 P.M.
Major Credit Cards Accepted

At Sidney Krandall & Sons, we offer
something more precious than diamonds. It's
a bond of trust our family has established
with all our customers...a bond of trust that
you and your family can count on today...and
into the future.

Martin, The Original

Throughout its history the Martin Dreadnought guitar .
has become so well known that other guitar makers have
copied its shape and dimensions. Competitors have
duplicated the size but have yet to recreate the heritage
and sound that comes from within. Although produced by
nearly all guitar makers here and abroad the Dreadnought
design remains an original Martin innovation that dates
back to 1916. Try A Martin Guitar today at:

THESTRING

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Mon-Thurs 11-8 • Fri-Sat 11-6

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FARMINGTON HILLS. MICHIGAN 488331 661-2106

Layaway
for the
Holidays

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Contemporary
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HOLIDAY
HOURS

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Sot. 10-5 • Sun. 12-5

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Is Rust"

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— Same Location Since 1972 —

HOME 356-3677
SHOP 493-0212
Senior Discount

Excellent Color Matching
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Save Your Deductible*
*Ask for details

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

55

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