100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 16, 1988 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COMMENT

`Love And Respect'

Continued from preceding page

Fuller Fashion Boutique

SATURDAY

SUNDAY
DECEMBER 17th & 18th ONLY

50
0
/0
OFF
THE ORIGINAL PRICE ON ALL

A MINIMUM OF

CURRENT SALE MERCHANDISE

S N' Aalt`

15% OFF

CR2EN VE /AR

OPEN SUNDAYS 12-5 TIL CHRISTMAS
All Sales Final • No layaways • Previous Sales excluded

Mon-Sat 10-6, Thurs. til 8 pm
11 Mile and Lahser Harvard Row Mall

354-4560

END YOUR ROOFING PROBLEMS THROUGH
CRAFTSMANSHIP

Woolf Roofing & Maintenance Inc.

A Third Generation Roofing Family in Detroit

Commercial - Industrial — High Rises
Single-Ply and Built-Up Systems
Fully Insured
Member
5-20 Year Warranties 18161 W. 13 Mile Rd.
National Roofing

in Southfield

Contractors
Association

L

22

j

Free Inspections

646-2452

JEWELRY APPRAISALS

At Very Reasonable Prices Call For An Appointment

taetu,g
O
6 /1

established 1919

k,

FINE JEWELERS

GEM/DIAMOND SPECIALIST
AWARDED CERTIFICATE BY GIA
IN GRADING AND EVALUATION

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1988

30400 Telegraph Road
Suite 134
Birmingham, MI 48010
(313) 642-5575

Daily 10-7
Sat. 10-4
Sun. 12-4

state and the people.
These are times of emergen-
cy. There is an anger in our
people, a sense of profound
alienation and resentment
that threatens the interde-
pendence of our people. The
centrality of Israel is in
jeopardy. Signs of the disso-
ciation of large numbers of
Diaspora and Israeli Jewry
are inescapapble.
This is the rime to call upon
the example of the spiritual
heroism of our rabbinic sages
who when confronted with
such crises turned to Psalm
119:126: "It is time for the
Lord to do something; they
have made void Thy Torah,"
and dared to translate it as a
call for audacious rabbinic
action—"It is time (for us) to
do something for the Lord, so
make void Thy Ibrah." There
are times our rabbinic sages
of the Talmud taught when
one is commanded not to say
that which will not be obeyed
(T. Yebamoth 65b). For "the
sake of peace," traditions and
laws are bent.
Rabbis are like physicians,
Maimonides argued. "Just as
the physician amputates an
arm or leg to save the whole
body, the bet din court may
advocate, when an emergen-
cy arises, the temporary dis-
regard of some of the com-
mandments so that the corn-
munity as a whole may be
preserved. As it is written,
"Rebuke not a scorner lest he
hate you." And here we are
not dealing with scorners. So
too, if, to bring back the
multitude to religion, the
court takes into account the

"needs of the hour" (Hilchoth
Mamrim 2:4). This wisdom is
in keeping with what the ear-
ly sages said: "Desecrate one
Sabbath on his account so
that he be able tc: observe
many Sabbaths" (Yuma 85b).
The amendment clause of the
Law of Return relentlessly
pushed by the Israeli rab-
binate is a rabbinic decree,
even though the venue of its
deliberation is the secular
Knesset. It is a decree which
the majority of the Jewish
community cannot and will
not endure. The Talmudic
sages did not function in a
sociological vacuum. "One
does not issue a decree which
the majority of the com-
munity cannot endure."
As an Orthdox rabbi, I
would know that the libelous
characterization of my non-
Orthodox rabbis are unwor-
thy, a violation of the precepts
of Judaism so insistent upon
guarding the words of our
mouth.
I would search for compat-
ible Jewish colleagues and I
would not be alone. I would
seek out my own Orthdox
brethren and hope to per-
suade them to exercise their
erudition and devotion to
Jewish law and Jewish life
and thereby raise the glory of
Torah and the people's respect
for Jewish law. I would not
allow the politicizatiDn of the
Jewish law. Especially in this
time of emergency, I could act
to defend the integrity of
Jewish peoplehood and the
dignity of Jewish law whose
ways are "ways of pleasant-
ness and paths of peace."

I NEWS I

Quayle Replacement
Upsets Activists

Opponents of forced prayer
in public schools were not
pleased by the appointment of
Rep. Dan Coats, (R-Ind.), to
fill the term of Sen. Dan
Quayle, now headed for the
vice president's mansion on
Massachusetts Avenue.
Coats, who has made a ca-
reer of keeping close to Dan
Quayle — he once worked as
an aide to Quayle, and won
the congressional seat va-
cated when Quayle stepped
up to the Senate — has earn-
ed the reputation as a fierce
advocate for Christian Right
causes, including prayer in
schools.
A spokesman for People for
the American Way, a group
that monitors church-state
issues, quickly blasted the
appointment.
Coats spearhead an unsuc-
cessful drive to attach a silent

prayer amendment to an edu-
cation bill — the measure is
still remembered as the
"Coats Amendment."
And the Indiana conserva-
tive was a leading player in
equal access legislation,
which required school admin-
istrations to allow religious
clubs to meet in public
schools.
Coats also has opposed for-
eign aid — apparently a stan-
dard practice in Indiana
politics.
"Congressman Coats' rec-
ord on church-state issues is
quite troubling," said Mark
Pelavin, assistant Washing-
ton representative of the
American Jewish Congress.
"He is not just a supporter of
the conservative moral agen-
da on school prayer, but one of
its chief advocates."

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan