100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 09, 1988 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I M USIC

WPB

ttii4A€4,

/1,0

C.0714,

Pinchas Zukerman Has
Two-Track Expertise

it,o&t,e4

MICHAEL ELKIN

Special to The Jewish News

The
Willow Tree

The
Maternite
Corner

Art Poster
Company

Women's Specialty
Store

Posters &
Framing

Redefines
Maternity

Quintessence

Ultimate in
Women's
Accessories

Lorraine &
Ina's

Fashion specialty
with a
personal touch

Encore III

Personalized
stationary —
invitations — gifts

29555 Northwestern Hwy.
Southfield
Extended Holiday Hours

Mail Boxes
Etc. USA

Marguerites ,
Primadonna

Packaging and
mailing services

For the
fuller figure

Marguerites
Boutique

Elegant evening
fashions

22

Edd's Barber
Shop

A cut above
the rest

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1988

Linda Hayman
Gallery

Original prints
and tabletop art

Norgrafic

Art & drafting
superstore

Irving's
Restaurant

The one
and only

C

onduct unbecoming
Pinchas Zukerman?
No, smiles the hand-
some violinist/violist. "I love
to conduct."
Witty and warm, Zuker-
man makes for a wonderful
interview, brimming with
brio, feisty and free-flowing.
He is at one with his music,
a number he must feel com-
fortable with, since so many
critics number him as one of
the best in the business.
Zukerman has been the
guest maestro of such leading
orchestras as the New York
Philharmonic and Boston
Symphony.
At 40, Zukerman is a
celebration unto himself. He
shares with his native Israel
a growth rarely paralleled
over four decades.
By the age of 19, Zukerman
captured top prize at the 25th
Leventritt International
Competiton. In the 21 years
since, he has built a
discography closing in on 100
recordings. He has won so
many awards and honors that
the word "best" does indeed
do the best job to describe
him.
Nobody bests Zukerman,
however, at downplaying the
role in plays in the music
world. He would rather just
talk about his . . . music. "I
don't see music as just a pro-
fession," he says. "I don't see
it as something I have to do.
I see it as a guiding friend, a
good friend with whom I have
shared many memories over
the years."
And what memories they
have been: Collaborations
with Daniel Barenboim, Jac-
queline Du Pre, Isaac Stern,
Jean-Pierre Rampal.
Zukerman doesn't roman-
ticize the musician's struggle
in what can be a frustrating
field. Instead, he takes a prac-
tical tact, offering a helping
hand for those bowed over by
the perilous pitfalls popping
up at every note.
"It's a matter of tzedakah,"
he says. "It's my way of giv-
ing something back. I try to
give a little bit of knowledge
that I've been able to gather
from my years in music.
Maybe they, the students, can
take this knowledge and then
go further on their own?'
Indeed, Zukerman's help is
a payback for the allowance
offered him by such masters
as Isaac Stern and Pablo
Casals — an allowance to
fail, to try and succeed

without worrying over fu-
ture engagements. Zukerman
cites Stern, Casals, the
American-Israel Cultural
Foundation, Juilliard School
of Music and the Helena
Rubinstein Foundation as
major benefactors and friends
in his life.
That's what friends are for
. . . "Now I am offering others
a chance," he says. "But you
know, my students also teach
me something. They give me
information. I see things
through their eyes, different
eyes, fresh eyes. You learn
from their excitement."
The teacher still a student
. . . Yet, it seems he has few
classes left to take. Zukerman

"It's my way of
giving something
back. I try to give
a little bit of
knowledge that
I've been able to
gather from my
years in music.

has proved a popular televi-
sion talk-show guest. His life
was the focus of a PBS series,
"Here to Make Music." Five
years ago, President Reagan
presented him with a Medal
of the Arts.
A musician deserves a
medal to do what he has to do
to make it in his field. Sure,
it's difficult, says Zukerman.
"But there are no shortcuts.
If there is one, let me know.
I'll take the magic pill.
"But I'll tell you," Zuker-
man tells me, "the computer
age has done some very good
things for kids today. They
seem more prepared to face
the strenuous life in the arts,
more than I was when I was
18."
Face it he has. Zukerman
also faces facts. No matter
how much talent, no matter
how much luck a musician
may have, the muse is all im-
portant. "It is you and you
alone," says Zukerman. "You
have to be honest with
yourself. If you don't do
enough for yourself, you're
only cheating."
No one will accuse Zuker-
man of cheating himself or-
his followers. After all, say
the fans of this gifted per-
former, everyone gets the best
of Zukerman — especially his
audiences.



Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan