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December 09, 1988 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS I

✓ttle/et/cc C ae /1/4/c

SEE THE ALL NEW 1989
FLEETWOOD SEDAN and
SEDAN DEVILLE

SEVERAL NOW
AVAILABLE IN STOCK

Sedan de Ville

Fleetwood Sedan

T. <

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The 1989 Cadillac Fleetwood Sedan

• New, longer design
• Distinctive profile with fender
• Luxurious interior

ALSO

• Increased legroom
• Tufted seating areas
• "Tiffany" carpeting

t a LkEe Aadvantage so f our

NO MONEY
DOWN!

NEW 1989
SEDAN
DEVILLE

Lease for

35
$430
Per Month

Stock #9095

or purchase $24
for
9

500*

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PHONE 851.7200

)u4.Grp,A)

-

The "Good Service" Dealer"

l[pillsoginv-,:as

OPIIIRAT MOTOR, CORPORATION

$60 mo. closed-end lease for qualified customers. Lease payment based on 60 mos., 75,000 mile limitation. 10$ per mile for excessive mileage.
Lessee has option to purchase vehicle at lease and for $9,922.17. Lessee is responsible for excessive wear and tear. 1st payment in advance
w/refundable security deposit of $450.00. To get total payments, multiply payment times 60. 4% use tax and plates extra.
'The invoice total includes factory holdback and advertising association assessments, and Is not a net factory cost price to the dealer. Invoice
may also not reflect the ultimate cost of the vehicle due to the possibility of future rebates, allowances, discounts and incentive awards fr ,--
the manufacturer.
•*Just add tax, title.

18

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1988

Arafat

Continued from Page 1

338 and called for a resolution
to the Palestinian refugee
problem.
A spokesman for the Israeli
embassy in Washington said
that no one would comment
until the text of the declara-
tion could be studied.
Washington's community of
Jewish activists, according to
Jewish News Capitol Cor-
respondent James Besser,
reacted with surprise to the
statements from Stockholm.
The delegation that met
with Arafat, representing the
International Center for
Peace in the Middle East, in-
cluded New York lawyer Rita
Hauser; Avraham Udovitch, a
Middle East specialist at
Princeton University; Mena-
chem Rosensaft, a leader of
the Labor Zionist Alliance
and a leader of Holocaust sur-
vivors activities; Drora Kass,
executive director of the
Center; and Stanley Schien-
baum, an economist.
Widespread reports that
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg, a
vice president of the World
Jewish Congress, and Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, presi-
dent of the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations,
were involved in the delega-
tion, but withdrew before the

Rita Hauser: Talks with Arafat.

meetings in Stockholm, ap-
pear to be incorrect. "We were
asked to participate," said
Hertzberg, "and we both
declined. End of story."
According to several
sources, preliminary talks
between the delegation, the
Swedish government and the
PLO had led the group to ex-
pect a statement from Arafat
on Israel's right to exist that
would come closer to U.S.
demands as a precondition for
any contact with the PLO.
"I think they went in the
expectation of some kind of
some kind of very forthright
statement," said William
Quandt, a top Middle East
specialist with the Brookings

Arafat-Jewish Statement

"The Palestinian Na-
tional Council met in
Algiers from Nov. 12 to 15,
1988, and announced the
Declaration of In-
dependence which pro-
claimed the state of
Palestine and issued a
political statement.
The following explana-
tion was given by the
representatives of the PLO
of certain important points
in the Palestinian Declara-
tion of Independence and
the political statement
adopted by the PNC in
Algiers.
Affirming the principle
incorporated in those U.N.
resolutions which call for a
two-state solution of Israel
and Palestine, the PNC:
1. Agreed to enter into
peace negotiations at an
international conference
under the auspices of the
U.N., with the participa-
tion of the permanent
members of the Security
Council and the PLO as
the sole legitimate
representative of the
Palestinian people, on an
equal footing with the
other parties to the con-
flict; such an international
conference be held on the
basis of U.N. Resolutions
242 and 338 and the right

of the Palestinian people to
self-determination,
without external in-
terference, as provided in
the U.N. Charter, in-
cluding the right to an in-
dependent state, which
conference should resolve
the Palestinian problem in
all its aspects;
2. Established the in-
dependent state of
Palestine and accepted the
existence of Israel as a
state in the region;
3. Declared its rejection
and condemnation of ter-
rorism in all its forms, in-
cluding state terrorism;
4. Called for a solution to
the Palestinian refugee
problem in accordance
with international law and
practices and relevant U.N.
resolutions (including
right of return or
compensation).
The American per-
sonalities strongly sup-
ported and applauded the
Palestinian Declaration of
Independence and the
political statement
adopted in Algiers and felt
there was no further im-
pediment to a direct
dialogue between the
United States government
and the PLO."

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