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December 02, 1988 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

tifitelettc C addic

SEE THE ALL NEW 1989
FLEETWOOD SEDAN and
SEDAN DEVILLE

SEVEAL NOW
AVAILABLE IN STOCK

Sedan de Vine

Fleetwood Sedan

LONG ON STYLE AND LUXURY
The 1989 Cadillac Fleetwood Sedan

• New, longer design
• Distinctive profile with fender
• Luxurious interior

ALSO •

• Increased legroom
• Tufted seating areas
• "Tiffany" carpeting

taileArEvas npteajaelsof our

NO MONEY
DOWN!

NEW 1989
SEDAN
DEVILLE

Lease for

35
$430
Per Month

Stock #9095

or purchase
for

$24 9 500*

7100 ORCHARD LAKE RD., WEST BLOOMFIELII MI 48322

The "Good Service" Dealer"

PHONE 851.7200

)U4 .GtroUlev6(,\

--

[El

SERVICE PARTS

0.11Al MO. 1 COR 0 10.1
0

$60 mo. closed-end lease for qualified customers. Lease payment based on 60 mos., 75,000 mile limitation:10$ per mile for excessive mileage.
Lessee has option to purchase vehicle at lease and for $9,922.17. Lessee is responsible for excessive wear and tear. 1st payment in advance
w/refundable security deposit of $450.00. To get total payments, multiply payment times 60. 4% use tax and plates extra.
The invoice total includes factory holdback and advertising association assessments, and Is not a net factory cost price to the dealer. Invoice
may also not reflect the ultimate cost of the vehicle due to the possibility of future rebates, allowances, discounts and incentive awards fr^—
the manufacturer.
**Just add tax, title.

11111II ■

20

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1988

40

Columnists Differ
On Palestinian State

441

ARTHUR J. MAGIDA

Special to The Jewish News

T

the twains of the polit-
ical right and left rare-
ly meet, as do those of
east and west. The declara-
tion of a Palestinian state was
no exception.
Recently, New York Times
liberal columnist Anthony
Lewis and syndicated colum-
nist William F. Buckley Jr.
drew differing conclusions
from the Palestinian state.
Lewis said the state was a
"significant step [by the PLO]
toward a realistic negotiating
posture." Although the Pales-
tine National Council state-
ment that declared the new
state did not renounce all ter-
rorism, Lewis took hope from
the statement's avoidance of
such phrases as "armed
struggle" and its "overwhelm-
ing emphasis" on
negotiation.
Lewis noted skeptics' ulti-
mate test of the PLO's sin-
cerity in settling Middle East
tensions: Whether PLO head
Yassir Arafat will step for-
ward with "the further neces-
sary steps for negotiation.
But, wrote Lewis, "for a
leader like Mr. Arafat to be
more forthcoming in what he
offers usually requires his
believing that the other side
will reciprocate."
Before Egypt's Anwar
Sadat went to Jerusalem in
1977, "he had been privately
advised that in exchange for
peace Israel would return all
or almost all of the Sinai.
There will be no hints of reci-
procity from the present gov-
ernment of Israel."
But Buckley claimed that
the Palestine National Coun-
cil's declaration of an already
existing state in what most
people already consider to be
Jordan "is a little bit on the
order of the American. Indian
National Council promulgat-
ing an Indian state?'
Unlike Lewis, Buckley saw
little positive in the creation
of the new state. The Pales-
tinians, he said, will take
their "diplomatic offensive" to
the United Nations, which,
"as the great base of interna-
tional anti-Semitism," will,
"of course, welcome the PLO's
undertaking."
Buckley's only optimism
came in advising that the
United States should focus on
demilitarizing the new state.
On this matter, he is certain
that Jordan will "genuinely
cooperate."

Life On Life

There's an old aphorism in
journalism about two of
Henry Luce's favorite maga-
zines: "Time is for people who
can't think and Life with all
its pictures] is for people who
who can't read."
Now, as if to bury once and
for all this denigration, the
current Life tackles the most
eternal of philosophical ques-
tions: What is the meaning of
life? Life posed the question to
49 scientists and theologians,
authors
and
artists,
celebrities and sages, to
everyone from Richard Nixon -
to the Dalai Lama.
Joining this very mixed bag
is a pretty hefty representa-
tion of Jews. Among them:
• Comedian Jackie Mason:
"Life has no meaning beyond
this reality. But people keep
searching for excuses. First,
there was reincarnation.
Then refabrication. Now,
there's theories of life after
amoebas, after death, between
death, around death. Now
you come back as a shirt, as
a pair of pants . . . People call
it truth, religion. I call it in-
sanity, the denial of death as
the basic truth of life. Life just
exists."
• Writer Elie Wiesel: "Life
has meaning in spite of the
meaningless death I have
seen. Death has no meaning,
life has. We must make every
minute rich and enriching,
not for oneself, but for some-
one else, and thereby create a
bridge between beings that
limits the domain of nothing-
ness. The meaning of life is to
be found in every encounter.
Every moment is a moment of
grace."
• Rabbi Harold Kushner:
"We come alive only when we
relate to others . . . We are
here to change the world with
small acts of thoughtfulness
done daily rather than with
one great breakthrough. We
are here to finish God's labor?'
• Writer Issac Bashevis
Singer: "Every living crea-
ture, as a child of God, is of
the highest importance. I am
greatly saddened by the bla-
tant disregard for life I see
every day. If man were taught
to treat each human being
and animal with the love and
respect that is accorded to
God, the Creator of all things,
then perhaps we would not
see the shameful neglect of
life — murders, wars, slaugh-
ters and rapes — that has
characterized all of human
history."
Continued on Page 22

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