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December 02, 1988 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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You Deserve to Look Your Best
This Holiday Season

Aid To Israel

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"definite cause" to be con-
cerned that foreign aid to
Israel will be reduced. In the
most recent major foreign aid
battle, for fiscal year 1988,
Congress cut the administra-
tion's request from $19.5
billion to $16.2 billion,
although it maintained the
$3 billion in aid to Israel.
Pro-Israel activists were
happier when the budget
summit of Nov. 1, 1987,
restored the administration's
international affairs budget
to $18.1 billion, which meant
smaller cuts for other foreign
aid recipients and avoided
greater resentment at Israel.
That agreement established
the foreign aid levels for both
fiscal years 1988 and 1989,
and helped Israel avoid any
major budget battle this year.
Foreign aid is considered
one of the most vulnerable of
all accounts in the U.S.
budget. Despite widespread
support in Congress for aid
for -Israel, most lawmakers
would likely not face reper-
cussions from voters for cut-
ting foreign aid in favor of
limiting cuts in health,
education and welfare
services.
"There is one constituency
to pass foreign aid — the pro-
Israel community," a Capitol
Hill source said. Without it,

"you could not get a dollar for
Egypt," which is receiving
$2.3 billion from the United
States this fiscal year.
The two countries receive
$5.3 billion of the $10 billion
in U.S. economic and military
aid to various countries.
Secretary of State-
designate James Baker III is
expected to follow Shultz's
precedent in testifying before

'If it goes through,
it will be because
Rabin gave the
administration a
green light.

the House and Senate budget
committees on behalf of
foreign aid, but it remains to
be seen if Baker will be as
pro-Israel as was Shultz.
Baker had expressed concern
about the debt-refinancing
plan in November 1987, say-
ing it could ultimately cost
the United States "tens of
billions of dollars."
On capitol Hill, three of the
top four seats on the budget
committees have leadership
changes that add uncertainty
about Israel's aid prospects,
although virtually all of the
lawmakers involved are
strongly pro-Israel.

Northville Trespassing
Ticket Is Dismissed

ALAN HITSKY

Associate Editor

A

trespassing charge
filed by Northville
Regional Psychiatric
Hospital against a Jewish pa-
tient advocate has been
dismissed;
Judge James Garber of
35th District Court in
Plymouth refused to issue a
warrant in the case. Although
the judge's action was taken
Nov. 7, patient advocate Ber-
nie Elbinger was not inform-
ed of the decision. Elbinger
appeared in court last
Wednesday for his pre-trial
hearing and was told by the
judge there was no case.
The Michigan State Police
issued a ticket to Elbinger
Sept. 8. They were summon-
ed by hospital authorities
who said Elbinger was
trespassing. Although a
volunteer, Elbinger has an of-
fice at NRPH and says he was
wearing the proper identifica-
tion badge at the time of the'
incident.
Dr. Walter Brown, NRPH
director, said Elbinger
disrupted hospital routine
when he asked to see a

Jewish patient's file during
the dinner hour. Dr. Brown
was on vacation this week
and unavailable to comment
on the dismissal of the ticket.
Although the case has been
dismissed, Elbinger said he
has resigned as a volunteer
assistant to the Jewish
chaplain, Rabbi Martin Gor-
don of the Livonia Jewish

Elbinger says he
was wearing the
proper
identification
badge.

Congregation. But Elbinger-
retains his hospital office as
a volunteer patient advocate.
Rabbi Gordon told The
Jewish News, "I feel bad that
he feels that I was not on his
side." The rabbi believes he
has the cooperation of the
hospital and chaplaincy staff
and that "understanding has
grown since I've been there."
It was Elbinger who involv-
ed Rabbi Gordon two years
ago when a Catholic chaplain
was leading Jewish services
for patients. Now there is on-
ly one Jewish patient at Nor-
thville, Rabbi Gordon said.

q11

4,1

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