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November 25, 1988 - Image 104

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

E „SHIP

Keeping The Faith

Continued from preceding page

I

GIFTS

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7 I-1

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104

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1988

2

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much,"
recalled
Ms.
Eisenberg.
Along with morning and
evening services, NCSYers
enjoyed a night at the movies
and studied Jewish heroes,
past and present. They also
played ping-pong, basketball,
volleyball and went swimm-
ing at the Jewish Comm-
munity Center in
Indianapolis.
The weekend was topped off
with a skating party, follow-
ed by an indoor bonfire that
featured the live sounds of the
Central East Band who
played well past midnight.
Activities in the past have
included a Tbrah Day and
King's Island weekend. Last
month NCSYers went
horseback riding.
The junior NCSYers (fifth-
eighth grade) have many ac-
tivities planned, including
movie night, bowling party,
ice-skating and sledding.
"There's no such thing as a
non-Jewish activity," Cohn
said. "The trick is to see the
activity through Jewish
glasses."
Last September, NCSY
adopted the Keiss-Kuna fami-
ly, who first applied for visas
to emigrate from the Soviet
Union 14 years ago. NCSYers
had written the Keiss-Kuna
family 100 letters a week
since last September.
Last month, NCSY was in-
formed that the Keiss-Kuna
family received permission to
emigrate.
George Keiss-Kuna, his
wife, Elana and their son, An-
drei will reside with Elana's
sister, Israel Philharmonic
violinist Anna Rosnovski, in

1

"I found out the good news
in the beginning of this
month," Cohn said. "Out of
the 375 letters that our
region sent to the Keiss-Kuna
family, only four got
in." NCSY has adopted a
new family, Vladimir and
Karmela Raiz and their two
sons, Moshe and Saul. Raiz is
a molecular biologist and
theoretical physicist. He also
teaches Judaism to non-
religious Jews in the Soviet
Union.
Chayla Pesis is the local ad-
viser of the 150 students in
the senior group, and Rachel
Paholack leads the 45 junior
NCSYers.
"I really like NCSY
because it makes you feel pro-
ud to be Jewish," said 10th
grader Shaindle Braunstein.
"Being part of NCSY is an in-
spiring experience."
"I definitely want to live in
Israel because it's the Jewish
homeland, and I feel that all
Jews should live there," noted
13- year-old Debra Chopp, a
member of B'nei Akiva. "We

need to sustain a strong
Jewish community in Israel."
Although B'nei Akiva and
NCSY have different ap-
proaches, they share the
belief that the Jewish future
rests with knowledgable and
proud Jewish youth.

INSIGHT I

U.S. Jewry
And The Needy

RABBI MARC TANENBAUM

Special to The Jewish News

N

ew York — How
should we regard the
needs of genuinely
poor people in our streets?
With generosity, compassion
and cheerfulness.
That is a central teaching of
biblical and rabbinic ethics,
and that obligation to relieve
poverty, both personally and
communally, should be the
moral framework for dealing
with the real problem of
phony panhandlers.
No one in his right mind
would advocate encouraging
scam artists and professional
hustlers. But most people, I
believe, are reasonably in-
telligent, and are capable of
judging who is really poor
and who is a flimflam beggar.
Withholding charity from
the phony beggar should not
become a license for
withholding aid from the tru-
ly needy.
That is not simply a do-
gooder's sentimentalism. If
you study biblical and rab-
binic ethics, you will know
that nothing is more basic
than the moral obligation of
tzedakah, which means both
charity and doing justice.
The Talmud declares in fact
that alms-giving — aiding the
poor and feeding the hungry
— is equal to all the com-
mandments of the Torah.
The rabbis dramatize the
point by saying, "He who has
no pity upon his fellow
creatures is assuredly not of
the seed of Abraham, our
father."
In Jewish communities
from biblical times to the pre-
sent, there was free and
generous giving of alms to all
who were in need.
There was also much
systematic and careful relief
through established chari-
table institutions, such as the
tamchui, or the public kit-
chen, and the pushka, or alms
box.
But the highest degree of
charity, Maimonides reminds

us, is to help a person get
work and therreby achieve
dignity through self-support
and independence.

Jewish Telegraphic Agency

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