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November 04, 1988 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THIS ISSUE 60(P

SERVING DETROIT'S JEWISH COMMUNITY NOVEMBER 4, 1988 / 24 CHESHVAN 5749

Religious Gains Tilt
Election Toward Likud

Labor is no longer Israel's largest party as both
major groups lose ground

DAVID HOLZEL

Staff Writer

As results of Israel's election were
trickling in Tuesday night, Alaine
Waldshan was rooting for the Likud.
"The Arabs are intending to eat
away at our land. The Likud can han-
dle a crisis like this," said the 15-year-
old United Hebrew Schools student.

Yitzhak Shamir:
Apparent winner in Tuesday's polling.

Emma
classmate
Her
Kleerekoper, 15, agreed, arguing that
a Labor victory would reward the
Palestinians for the wave of terror
that hit Israel this week and for the
11-month-old intifada.
Israelis apparently felt the same
as they gave the Likud of Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, if not a
clear-cut victory, then a better chance
of forming a governing coalition than

Tilling The Garden

the Labor Party of Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres.
The election also saw a gain for
Israel's religious parties, giving them
unprecedented leverage with Labor
and Likud as the major parties try to
form a governing majority.
Sixty-one seats are necessary for
a majority in the 120-seat Knesset. As
The Jewish News went to press
Wednesday, Likud was given 39 seats
and Labor 38 seats.
In the 1984 elections, Likud won
41 seats and Labor 44. The result of
the stalemate was the National Uni-
ty Government.
This week's election results mark-
ed the first time that the Labor Par-
ty — which governed Israel from 1948
until 1977 — did not win a plurality
of Knesset mandates. It was also the
first time that the Likud — which has
led the government for all but two
years since 1977 — became Israel's
largest political party.
"This marks the end of the road
for the Labor Party;' said Dr. Yosef
Olmert, a Middle East affairs expert
at Tel Aviv University. "There is no
question that the Israeli Jewish vote
is more right wing than left."
Olmert and others participated in
an inter-continental teleconference,
beamed by satellite Tuesday evening
from Jerusalem and New York to 32
North American cities. In Detroit,
some 175 people watched the program
at the United Hebrew Schools. Local-
ly, the teleconference was sponsored
by the Jewish Welfare Federation, the
Jewish Community Council and the
Detroit Zionist Federation.
Olmert said that this week's two

Continued on Page 16

CLOSE-UP

A
BURNING
HISTORY

BOOK
FAIR
FANFARE

Temple Beth El's new rabbi,
Daniel Polish, welcomes the challenge
of bringing the congregation back
from a year of controversy

Page 57

Page 93

Story Page 24

Kristallnacht:

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