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October 28, 1988 - Image 81

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

lig. Books Teach Many Subjects
,A ctis
sitv'

t if4c

"Mother," he asked, "these
people are so tired and so old. How
do they have the strength to give so
much to Grandpa?"
"David," his mother told him,
"they love Grandpa. They have
loved him for many, many years. For
when they were in need, Grandpa
did the same for each one of them.
Always it has been Grandpa that
they leaned upon in troubled times.
He gave them his strength and
without ever being asked. Now they
will give him whatever strength they
have."
And as his mother spoke, David
grew ashamed — not this time of
his Grandpa's poor English nor of
the way he walked and looked —
but of himself. He grew ashamed of
himself for ever having been
ashamed of a man so good.
Quietly he crept into the room
where his Grandpa lay dozing and
quietly took the broken cane. In his
own room with the greatest care
and patience, he glued the two
pieces together. He found a small
piece of metal which he cut and
hammered into the proper size and
shape to fit around the break, and
he worked it on so it fitted snug and
firm. Then he polished the silver
disk, which said, "To Mayer on his
50th birthday, from those who love
him well." More than 30 years ago
his friends had given him the cane.
Now David brought it back to him
whole and strong so that he might
lean upon it when he got well.
His Grandpa, his face pale and
shriveled against the pillow, looked
at the mended cane and smiled.
"Nu nu, yingele," he
murmured. And David thought there
were real tears in the always watery
eyes.

Reprinted by permission from More
World Over Stories, edited by
Ezekiel Schloss and Morris Epstein.

Answers To
Match The Books

7.G
1. C
8. L
2. D
9. J
3. A
10. I
4. E
11. H
5. B
12. F
6. K
This matching quiz was
compiled by Pat Milner, assistant
administrator, Jewish Federatioon
Apartments.

Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will present a Yiddish
lesson entitled, "Du Redst Yiddish
(Do You Speak Yiddish?)," whose
aim is to encourage further study of
Yiddish. The lesson will include a
brief story utilizing the Yiddish
words to be studied, a vocabulary
list with English translations and a
family activity which involves using
the new words. Two books which
may be helpful for beginning
Yiddish students are Yiddish for
Beginners by Dr. Joffen and Der
Yiddisher Lerer by Goldin.
Weinreich's English-Yiddish
Dictionary also may be useful. At
the conclusion of each lesson will
be a suggested list of books for
persons who wish to further their
knowledge.
The lessons were prepared by
Mary Koretz of Oak Park. She has
taught both children's and adult
classes in Yiddish at the Workmen's
Circle.
Following is this month's
lesson:
One can mahchen a reizeh on
a bahn or an ahvion or a shif.
However, one can oich take a trip
by Iehzin a book. By means of a
buch one can zich forshtelin a visit
to Paris, Franhkreich; Moscow,
Ruslahnd or afileh Cheena.
Mit a book one can learn to
ehsin with proper nutrition and
opkochin so one can fargehnign
hobn. A cookbook tells you how to
prepare flaysh, hindlech and
kalbflaysh. It also guides us in the
preparation of a milchediker meal;
a vunderbar tsimes, potato
latkehs, golden blintses.
With books you can also learn
to machen things like mehbl,
tishin, chairs or cases to hold
books. You can learn to make
tsiring, necklaces, bracelets and
fingerls. We learn skills from books,
medicine, aptayker, how to run a
krom.
But one of the most vichtik
things a book can teach us has to
do with what makes us Jewish. It
describes our geshichte, our
moralishe standards, our basic
philosophy as compared to andere
religions, our belahtristik and the
source of our trehrin and our
gehlechter.
We are truly the mentshen of
the book. Where once the book
referred nor to the Bible, the
meaning has broadened to embrace
andere books as well. Our
dedication to books may have
served to keep us alive as a folk.

Vocabulary

mahchen a reizeh
bahn
ahvion
shif
oich
Iehzin
buch
zich forshtelin
Franhkreich
Ruslahnd
afileh
Cheena
mit
ehsin
opkochin
fargehnign
hobn
flaysh
hindlech
kalbflaysh

make a trip
train
airplane
boat
also
read
book
imagine
France
Russia
even
China
with
eat
cook
pleasure
have
meat
chickens
veal

dairy
milchediker
wonderful
vunderbar
a dish made principally of
tsimes
carrots and meat
pancakes
latkehs
bilini
blintses
make
machen
furniture
mehbl
tables
tishin
jewelry
tsiring
rings
fingerls
pahrmacist
aptayker
store
krom
important
vichtik
history
geshichte
moral
moralishe
other
andere
fiction
belahtristik
tears
trehrin
laughter
gehlachter
people
mentshen
only
nor
a people
folk

Books For Families

Last year, Detroit's Jewish librarians
were asked to draw up a list of the books
they would recommend for families.
Following are the titles they most
frequently recommended:
Brothers: A Hebrew Legend,
Florence B. Freedman; Captain Jiri and
Rabbi Jacob, Marilyn Hirsh; Joseph Who
Loved the Sabbath, Marilyn Hirsh; Molly's
Pilgrim, Barbara Cohen; Mrs. Moskowitz
and the Sabbath Candles, Amy Schwartz;
Only Nine Chairs: A Tall Tale, Deborah
Uchill Miller; Potato Pancakes All Around,
Marilyn Hirsh; The Tale of Meshka the
Kvetch, Carol Chapman.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L 7

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