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October 28, 1988 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ISRAEL UPDATE I

At Newton, you'll turn
your fondest dreams
into the finest designs.

you'll save on every custom
sofa fabric and style. Every
sleeper. Every sectional.
Now combine our custom
sofa savings with superb
discounts on the best
in brand names. Like
Bernhardt, Lane, Stiffel,

& Flair. It all adds up to
the quality you dream
about — minus the high
prices.
All in all, it's a dream
designed to come true. (But
get in early. Sale prices
are one week only.)

Kibbutz Changes: Less
Equality, More Privacy

SHELDON KIRSHNER

tioi m aN •f1861 ,1)

You have an idea of the
sofa you want. You know
the look, style, and fabric
which are perfect for your
home.
That's why this sale is
perfect for you.
Because for one week,

Israelis at work in 1949. As kibbutzniks grew older labor-intensive work
was reduced.

Custom-covered sofas, now sale priced from only $595.

When you select a Newton custom sofa,
you get:
• Your choice from 1,000 designer fabrics —
with Newton's exclusive wear-tested
warranty;
• Your choice from 457 custom sofa styles —
including lifetime frame / spring
guarantee;
• Custom delivery in only 30 working days.
There's no better sofa anywhere. Come and
see for yourself.

Furniture So Good
It's Guaranteed.

Sterling Heights

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betw. 16 & 17 Mile
264-3400

Novi
12 Oaks Mall Service Drive,

Opposite Hudson's Entrance
349-4600

Livonia
On Middlebelt,
betw. 5 & 6 Mile
525-0030

Daily 10-9 • Sunday 12-5 • MasterCard, Visa, and Convenient Terms

Charles R. Young, D.P.M.
Marshall G. Solomon, D.P.M.
Marie Delewsky, D.P.M.

Are proud to announce the relocation of our brand new
facility in Farmington Hills.

The new office is located on the west side of Middlebelt between 8 Mile & Grand River

TOTAL FAMILY FOOT CARE

• Geriatric Foot Care
• Palliative Foot Care
• Sports Medicine
• Ambulatory Foot Surgery
• Pediatric Foot Problems
• Hospital Foot Surgery
• Functional Accommodative Inlays
New Patients Accepted. Emergency Foot Care Coverage 24 Hours.
Take the right step for better foot health, call today to make an
appointment to see one of our qualified foot doctors at

NEW
OFFICE y

5

EIGHT 1A LE

SEVEN MILE

4

Foot Specialists, P.C.
FARMINGTON HILLS
WEST BLOOMFIELD
OFFICE
OFFICE

21111 Middlebelt Rd.

4244 Orchard Lake Rd.

(Between 8 Mile & Grand River)

(Just North of Lone Pine Road)

478-1150

681-4622

F IDAY OCTOBER 28 1988

Special to The Jewish News

N

ew York — The kib-
butz, Israel's unique
contribution to collec-
tive living, has changed con-
siderably after 40 years of
Israeli statehood.
• Agriculture, once the
pillar of the kibbutz economy,
is gradually giving way to
industry.
• The ideological purity
and idealism that used to
characterize much of the kib-
butz movement has been
diluted by economic im-
peratives and personal
desires.
• Younger members are
leaving at an alarming rate,
but urban Israelis are filling
the gap.
There are some 280 kibbut-
zim today, whose members
represent 3.6 percent of
Israel's population. In 1948,
the figure was 7.5 percent. As
new immigrants poured into
Israeli cities in the wake of
the War of Independence, they
all but bypassed kibbutzim,
resulting in a population
decline to 2.9 percent. In the
1960s, as disenchantment
with the city grew, Israelis
turned to the kibbutz as an
alternative to urban life.
Degania, the first kibbutz,
was established in 1909 near
the shores of the Sea of
Galilee (Lake Kinneret). By
1918, the number had risen
to 29. There were 149 when
Israel became a sovereign
nation.
Most kibbutzim belong to
the United Kibbutz Move-
ment, which is identified with
the Labor Party. Kibbutzim
affiliated with the left-of-
center Mapam party are
grouped into the Kibbutz Ar-
zi movement. Religious kibut-
zim, the least numerous, are
associated with the political
Mizrachi movement.

From the days of Degania,
the kibbutz always has been
one of the strongest links in
the Zionist chain. Israel's
founding fathers and
mothers, primarily secular
East European Jews who em-
phasized the importance of
physical labor, viewed
agriculture as a way of life,
not just a means of making a
living.
In terms of output, the kib-
butz has been extremely
fruitful. Kibbutzim grow 50
percent of Israel's commercial
crops and produce 9 percent of
its manufactured goods,
Shlomo Leshem, a spokes-
man for the United Kibbutz
Movement, pointed out in an
interview from his office in
Tel Aviv.
Gesher Haziv, whose lush
banana fields can be glimps-
ed from the white chalky
cliffs of Rosh Hanikra, was
founded on the grounds of a
former British army base in
1949 by North American im-
migrants and Israelis.
Like the majority of kib-
butzim today, Gesher Haziv is
beautifully landscaped, a
tranquil rural retreat only 20
miles from the bustle of
Haifa.
Akiva (Ken) Ziv, born in Los
Angeles, was one of the
founders. Ziv, who comes from
a Habonim background- and
who tends the kibbutz
gardens, recalled the idealism
that animated its members at
the beginning. "It was like a
summer camp," he said.
And life was exceedingly
simple. First the settlers liv-
ed in tents, then in rudimen-
tary permanent housing. Now
some of them live in small but
comfortable quarters. "We
didn't have many material
things, but as time went on,
children came along and we
got older, things became more
complicated."
Ziv, a robust 60, explained
how prosperity gradually

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