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October 28, 1988 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UP FRONT

Soviet Jewry Activists
Debate Reaction To Circus

ELIZABETH KAPLAN

Staff Writer

L

More than $14 million was invested in Israel Bonds on Monday by the 1,000 persons attending
the Congregation Shaarey Zedek dinner honoring Paul Borman. Shown holding Borman's
Silver Medal Award from the State of Israel are Rabbi Irwin Groner, David Hermelin, William
Davidson and Borman.

Midrash And Freud Explain
Lilith's 'Fatal Attraction'

DAVID HOLZEL

Staff Writer

T

wo conflicting accounts of the
origin of humanity can be
found in the opening chapters
of Bereshit, the book of Genesis. In
Chapter 1, verse 27, God creates man
in His image, male and female, side
by side.
Chapter 2, verses 21-23, describes
the more familiar tale of woman be-
ing created out of a rib of the already
existing man.
How does Judaism respond to this
inconsistency? The answer, according
to Dr. Mashey Bernstein, is Lilith.

Bernstein, a lecturer at the
University of Michigan's department
of English, added that the Lilith myth
is the prototype for the recent film,

Fatal Attraction.
Lilith is the wife mentioned in
Genesis 1, while Eve, the mother of
all people, is the wife of Adam who
was created from his rib in Genesis 2,
Bernstein said.
Bernstein described Lilith's fate
to some 90 persons Oct. 20 at the
United Hebrew Schools. The program
was sponsored by the Midrasha and
Hadassah.
"Lilith is the Medusa of the

Continued on Page 16

ast December, more than 1,000
Michigan residents were pack-
ing their bags and scrambling
to book flights to Washington for
what would become one of the most
impressive rallies ever held for Soviet
Jewry.
Now, with the Moscow Circus
scheduled for a five-day visit next
month at the Palace of Auburn Hills,
Soviet Jewish support groups are
wondering what — if anything — they
will do about the Soviet troupe's visit
here.
"We haven't made any firm deci-
sions," said David Gad-Harf, ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish Com-
munity Council, which oversees the
Soviet Jewry Committee. "There are
a lot of different activities we're still
exploring."
Meanwhile, two Jewish-owned
businesses — Farmer Jack and the
Palace — are supporting the circus's
appearance here.
The change, for at least one of
those involved, is glasnost.
Officials at Farmer Jack offered
coupons for half-price tickets to the
circus because of "our belief that rela-
tions between the United States and
the Soviet Union are moving in a
positive direction," according to
Gilbert Borman, director of publicity
for Borman's Inc.
Borman's Inc., which is headed by
Paul Borman, operates Farmer Jack
stores throughout southwestern
Michigan.
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-

bachev's glasnost policy also has
resulted in an increased number of
Jewish emigrants, which contributed
to Borman Inc.'s decision to issue
coupons for tickets, Gilbert Borman
said.
The circus is scheduled for Nov.
15-20 at the Palace, which is owned
by David Hermelin, Robert Sosnick
and William Davidson.
Tom Trzos, director of facility ad-
ministration at the Palace, said "it
never crossed our minds" that a
Soviet group's appearance at a
Jewish-owned facility might be
controversial.
He said Palace administrators
view the circus strictly as "a cultural
event?'
Trzos said he was responsible for,
booking the circus, yet he did notify
the owners of his decision.
"They were made aware of it," and
did not object, Trosz said.
Members of the JCCouncil's
Soviet Jewry Committee this week
distributed leaflets outside the Music
Hall before the performance here of
the Moscow State Symphony.

.

Gad-Harf said members of the
committee will meet soon to discuss
whether they will take action at the
Moscow Circus.
Officials at Farmer Jack spoke at
length before deciding to issue
coupons for circus tickets, Gilbert Bor-
man said.
The offering of half-price tickets
to opening night at the Moscow Cir-
cus marks the first time Farmer Jack
has supported the visit here by a
Soviet group, he said. Borman added
Continued on Page 18

ROUND UP

Prize Given
Despite Charges

1

New York (JTA) — Despite
charges of anti-Semitism
against the designated reci-
pient of a prestigious religion
prize, the Templeton Founda-
tion has gone ahead and
presented its 1988 award to
Dr. Inamullah Khan, secre-
tary-general of the World
Muslim Congress.
Khan, a Pakistani, received
the Templeton Prize on Sept.
28 in Melbourne, Australia.
The presentation of the award
was postponed for five months
following accusations of
Khan's anti-Semitism that
were made by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and the American
Jewish Committee.
The award had been an-

nounced March 2, but its
scheduled presentation in
April was postponed,
reportedly at Khan's own re-
quest, while the Thmpleton
Foundation investigated the
Jewish groups' accusations.
The ADL expressed outrage
this week upon learning that
Khan received the award.

Rock Throwers
Wounded

Jerusalem (JTA) — Two
Arab youths were wounded
Tuesday, when Israel Defense
Force soldiers opened fire on
rock-throwers in the West
Bank towns Nablus and
Ramallah.
There were also distur-
bances in east Jerusalem on
Tuesday morning. Students

blocked roads and threw rocks
at passing vehicles, causing
damage but no casualties.
The police intervened and
made several arrests. The
students were protesting the
two-day closure of a local
school that had been the
scene of repeated
disturbances.
Meanwhile, reports that a
7-year-old Arab boy died of
wounds received Monday,
during a clash with security
forces in the Gaza Strip town
of Rafah, turned out to be
erroneous.
A spokesman for Tel
Hashomer Hospital, where
the youngster was taken,
reported he has regained con-
sciousness. The report of his
death was the result of an er-
ror of communications to the
military government in Gaza.

Journalists
Lose Credentials

Jerusalem (JTA) — Three
foreign journalists lost their
press credentials Tuesday for
violating censorship
regulations.

Andres Whitley of the
Financial Times, Steve Weiz-
man of Reuters news agency
and Paul Taylor, the Reuter
bureau chief in Israel, were
summoned to the Govern-
ment Press Office and ordered
to hand in their press cards.

Their press privileges were
suspended for failure to sub-
mit to the military censors
stories alleging that Israel
sent hit squads into the ad-
ministered territories to

murder leaders of the Palesti-
nian uprising.
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin categorically denied
the reports. The story was
totally groundless, he told
reporters Tuesday.

Kahane Lacks
U.S. Passport

Washington (JTA) — Rabbi
Meir Kahane wants to return
to the United States, but he
does not have a valid U.S.
passport, State Department
officials said Tuesday.
A second department
source said Kahane "was
planning to travel to the
United States, but we have in-
formed him by phone last
week and by writing that he
is no longer" a U.S. citizen.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

5

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