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October 21, 1988 - Image 69

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

---

I GOING PLACES

WEEK OF OCT. 21 27

-

CITY OF SOUTHFIELD
Southfield Library, Marcotte
Room, "Don't Let It Be Forgot,"
series exploring the Arthurian
legends. Tuesday, film Excaliber,
354-9100.
BALDWIN LIBRARY
300 W. Merrill, Birmingham,
Mystery Week, film Laura,
Monday; Richard Douglass
discusses mystery books,
Tuesday; William Kienzle
speaks, Wednesday; mystery play
by the Lakeland Players,
Thursday. 7:30 p.m. each night.
647-1700.

THEATER

Melanie Mayron is pictured in the "Couples" episode from "thirtysomething" with actor Ken Olin.

iM elaniesomething

History has repeated itself in acting roles for Melanie Mayron

MICHAEL ELKIN

Special to The Jewish News

n that Claudia Weill movie,
Girl Friends, Melanie Mayron
portrayed Susan Weinblatt, a
struggling but dedicated pho-
tographer trying to find focus
in a life blurred with obstacles.
A decade later, Mayron is one of
the stars of television's much talked
about hit "thirtysomething," appear-
ing as a photographer trying to find
focus in a life .. .
Even if the description of the role
hasn't changed, Mayron's fortunes
certainly have. Today, the appealing
actress, who once turned down a
chance to star in a "Happy Days"
spinoff, "Ralph, Potsie and Maxine"
— "I was Maxine," she says with a
laugh — is turning heads in
Hollywood. Happy days are here for
Melanie Mayron — on her own terms.
And they are terms of endear-
ment for an actress who has waited
long for what she wants. "In 1968,
when I was in Jerusalem, I visited the
Wailing Wall," she told me at our first
meeting.
"I wrote this message, all about
peace, and stuck the note in one of the
crevices of the wall.

"But before I folded it up, I scribbl-
ed a P.S. on it. 'God; I said, 'it occurs
to me that I want to be an actress.
Now I know being an actresis a risky
business and there are no guarantees.
" 'But I feel that you must have
stuck this idea, that of being an ac-
tress, I mean, in my head so I'm sure
you'll make everything work out
fine: "
Her message was answered: As
"thirtysomething" 's photographer,
Melissa, Mayron provides a frame of
reference for other young women who
have blithely jumped over their 20s
only to land with a thud in their 30s.
Melissa didn't look before she leapt;
the lake she once gleefully glided over
has dried up into a granite pond. And,
as she learns too often, gravel can
scar.
Melissa may not have watched
where she was going, but Melanie cer-
tainly
tainly has. Facing her mid-30s, fitting
nicely into the age group of the show'
characters, Mayron has faced down
tsuris and won.
Mayron has always held out for
quality roles, one reason she turned
down the "Potsie" part.
Bombshell roles — often tempting
to out-of-work actresses — bombed out
with Mayron. She was more in-

terested in meaningful roles, even
when that meant not working when
they weren't offered.
The past decade has been one of
determination — a gritty and gutsy
bid to stick to her dreams.
And, as we speak again, Mayron
is dreaming in Technicolor.
A new film, Sticky Fingers, a com-
edy starring Mayron, has recently
opened.
Mayron is in good company. Also
starring in the film are Eileen Bren-
nan and Carol Kane.
But then, actress Mayron had a
hint and a hand in determining who
her co-stars would be: she is also the
film's co-writer and co-producer. Her
collaborator, Catlin Adams, is also the
film's director.
"It's a woman buddy film," says
Mayron. She and Adams had been
working to sell their project for four
years. "It's proof that if you believe in
something, you can do it. This is a
dream come true for me."
Stick-to-it-iveness led to Sticky
Fingers; dedication is a welcome glue
when welded to talent.
Producer Mayron — Melanie likes
the sound of it. Not that she wants to
give up acting, however, She has en-
joyed her roles too much to do that.

BIRMINGHAM THEATER
211 S. Woodward, Birmingham,
I'm Not Rappaport, Wednesday
through Dec. 18, previews
Wednesday and Thursday,
admission. 644-3533.
HILBERRY AND
BONSTELLE THEATERS
Wayne St. University, Detroit,
Georgia Peach, about former
Detroit Tiger star Ty Cobb, now
through Dec. 9, Hilberry; A Life
in the Theater, now through Dec.
15, Hilberry; admission.
577-2972.
GREENFIELD VILLAGE
Museum Theater, Dearborn,
Laura, now through Nov. 12,
admission. 271-1620.
MEADOW BROOK THEATER
Oakland University, Rochester,
Amadeus, now through Oct. 30,
admission. 377-3300.
ROSEDALE COMMUNITY
PLAYERS
21728 Grand River at Lahser,
Don't Tell Mother, today and
Saturday, admission. 532-4010.
THE THEATER COMPANY
Smith Theater, University of
Detroit, Lily Dale, now through
Sunday, admission. 927-1130.
MICHIGAN OPERA
THEATER
Fisher Theater, Detroit, Follies,
now through Nov. 6,admission.
874-7878.
DETROIT YOUTHEATRE
Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200
Woodward, The Hello Show,
puppet show, Saturday,
admission. 832-2730.
TITTABAWASSEE JANE
1515 Broadway, Detroit, now
through Sunday; Thursday
through Oct. 30, Performance
Network, Ann Arbor, musical set
in Middleton, Michigan, home of
Sow Chemical, admission.

IIIMINOMY'MNXMiii

SPECIAL EVENTS

F-

Continued on Page 75

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

69

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