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October 14, 1988 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HIAS Honors Shultz For
Emigration Work

New York (JTA) — Secretary
of State George Shultz cau-
tioned last week that the re-
cent loosening of Soviet
emigration restrictions on
Jews can change and urged
Jewish leaders to "never let
up in our efforts to help peo-
ple leave."
Shultz was being honored
by the Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society (HIAS) for his
work on behalf of human
rights, and Jewish emigration
in particular.
Shultz received the HIAS
1988 Liberty Award for his
"determined pursuit of
freedom of emigration for
Soviet Jews."
The award was presented by
Ben Zion Leuchter, president
of HIAS, who praised Shultz's
perseverance on behalf of
Soviet Jews and all persons
seeking human rights.

Now thru Oct. 22, Art Poster Co. is offering 20% off on our extensive selection of original
Nagel serigraphs. Commemoratives 1-14 are available at dramatic savings.
Additional Patrick Nagel serigraphs are available at these special sale prices. (Due to
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a desperate attempt to save helpless
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Your contribution makes Michigan
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VOTE JUDGE

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STEMPIEN
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Legislature.
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48

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The Zvi Hirsch Masliansky
Award, the other HIAS an-
nual award, was presented
this year to the United
Jewish Appeal—Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies of New
York for its leadership efforts
on behalf of refugees and
immigrants.
The award was presented by
Harold Friedman, HIAS
president emeritus, to Peggy
Tishman, UJA-Federation
president.
Tishman used the occasion
of the award to announce a
special $1 million loan pro-
gram to Soviet Jews in Israel
for housing, job training and
placement.
Also honored was theatrical
producer Joseph Papp, whose
Public Theater in lower
Manhattan was home to
HIAS from 1921-1965.

Israel To Re-Immunize
Nation Against Polio

Tel Aviv (JTA) — The
Health Ministry announced
last week that the entire
population of Israel will be re-
inoculated against polio. The
health ministry is now plan-
ning an assault on a new out-
break of rabies.
Three international polio
experts, including Professor
Joseph Melnick who first
brought the vaccine to Israel
in the 50s, proposed that both
the Salk and Sabin vaccines
be administered for max-
imum protection.
The Health Ministry had
confined its vaccination cam-
paign to the Hadera, Lod-
Ramla, Rehovot and Acre
areas, where the polio virus
was discovered in sewage.
No more than eight polio
cases had been confirmed, but
public anxiety reached its
peak last month, only to be
replaced by a fear of rabies.
Seven rabid foxes have bit-
ten dogs in Jerusalem alone
in the last six weeks, the
highest number in so short a
time,
according to
veterinarians.
According to Israeli author-
ities, rabid foxes enter Israel
from Jordan, where the
disease is rampant.
Dr. Gideon Chassis, the
Health Ministry's chief
veterinarian, has recom-
mended that foxes be im-
munized against rabies by the
distribution of chicken heads
injected with weakened
rabies virus. The alternative
is poisoning 70 percent of the
wild foxes in Israel,

4

4=4

Immunization is used in the
United States and Europe,
but not in Israel because of
the cost.

German Jewish
Leader Worried
By The Death
Of Bavarian

Bonn (JTA) — The chair-
man of the West German Jew-
ish Community has express-
ed concern that extreme
right-wing parties, including
some with neo-Nazi records,
could benefit from the death
of Franz-Josef Strauss, the
prime minister of Bavaria,
who died of a heart attack
recently at the age of 73.
Strauss headed the staun-
chly conservative Christian
Social Union and was a
lightening rod for ultra-right
wing groups which otherwise
might have drifted into the
extremist camp, according to
Heinz Galinski, the West Ger-
man Jewish leader.
The Christian Social
Union, though indigenous to
Bavaria, influenced national
politics through its close
alliance with Chancellor
Helmut Kohl's ruling Chris-
tian Democratic Union.
Galinski said in an inter-
view with the Hanover daily
Neue Presse that it was
unlikely Strauss' successors
would be able to attract the
arch-conservative constituen-
cies that were personally
loyal to Strauss.

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