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September 30, 1988 - Image 85

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FINE JEWELRY
REPRODUCTIONS
FOR TRAVELING
We Have It All!

TRUE FAUX

REPRODUCTIONS OF THE FOIVOT QUALITY
280 N. Woodward, Downtown Birmingham, 433-1150 f

MIREILLE BOUTIQUE

Versatile Designs
Created By Mireille
Including:
• Wool Jersey Separates
• Spandex • Fleece •
and occasional silk pieces

MIREILLE

in Franklin Village
32751 Franklin Rd. • 737-7277

Upstairs from Beadworks • Hours: Tues.-Sat. 10-5:00

In The Sukkah

Continued from Page 76

Philanthropy
Has Many
Dimensions.
Robbyn
Is One Of Them.

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has
plans for you .. .
plans to help you save dollars
while you help save children's lives.
Children like Robbyn, who are born
with the incurable disease cystic
fibrosis, are depending on your
help — for their hope.
You can become a philanthropist
and a lifesaver, through personal
financial planning guidance avail-
able through the CF Foundation.
Let us show you how to plan a life-
time income with accompanying
tax advantages.
For details, call
your local Cystic Fibrosis Chapter,
or contact:
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
3379 Peachtree Road, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30326
(404) 262-1100

This space contributed as a public service.

THE HEAD PAIN FOUNDATION
OF MICHIGAN
presents

HEADACHE

Myths, Misunderstandings
and Modern Treatment

An informal evening and candid discussion about
society's most misunderstood, debilitating illness. Addressing
the most current methods of treatment and new approaches
to gaining control over pain.

Featuring Joel R. Saper, M.D., FACP, nationally recognized physician,
author and frequent lecturer on the topic of headache and chronic pain.
Dr. Saper is the Director of the Michigan Headache and Neurological
Institute, Ann Arbor.

Date and Time: 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 11, 1988, at the Troy Hilton,

1455 Stephenson Highway, Troy, Michigan.

No admission fee: Pre-registration is required. To register, call 544-6999.

Enrollment will be limited.

The Head Pain Foundation of Michigan is a non-profit organization
formed by those who suffer from chronic head and neck pain.

78

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1988

kin pie filling, is an old
favorite of mine.
Caramel coating:
6 tablespoons packed
brown sugar
11/2 tablespoons butter or
margarine
2 tablespoOns water
Pumpkin custard:
3 large eggs
3 /4 cup packed brown sugar
1% cups evaporated milk
(or non-dairy creamer)
1 (16-ounce) can pureed
pumpkin
2 teaspoons ground
cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
3 /4 teaspoon ground cloves
1 /4 teaspoon ground
allspice
3 4 cup finely chopped
pecans (optional)
Garnish:
About 6 pecan halves
Whipped cream (or
whipped non-dairy
topping)
Have a 7- to 8-cup oven-
proof mold, baking pan, or
metal bowl ready. For the
caramel, put the brown sugar
and butter (or margarine) in-
to a small saucepan, and stir
over medium heat until the
mixture boils. Boil 1 minute,
stir in the water, then boil 4
minutes longer. Pour the
caramel into the mold, pan, or
bowl, and swirl so the entire
inside is coated. Set aside. (Be
careful, as the caramel will be
hot.)
For the custard, beat the
eggs with the brown sugar
until combined. Stir in the
milk (or creamer), pumpkin,
and spices until well mixed.
Then stir in the chopped
pecans (if used). Pour the mix-
ture into the prepared mold,
and place in in a large pan.
Add boiling water to the large
pan so that it comes at least
halfway up the side of the
mold. Bake in a preheated
325-degree oven for about 1%
hours or until the center is
firm and a small knife in- •
serted in the center comes out
clean.
Remove the mold from the
water, and cool it slightly at
room temperature. Then
refrigerate it until the
custard is completely chilled.
Run a knife around the edges
of the custard, and invert on-
to a serving platter. Arrange
the pecan halves on top, and
serve with whipped cream (or
topping). Makes about 6 to 8
servings.

MEAT AND
CHICKEN TZIMMES

This is another family
favorite that I frequently
prepare for Rosh Hashanah or
Sukkot. The chicken is a
relatively recent addition
that I began to include for
family members who are

avoiding red meat due to high
cholesterol.
• An
approximately
3-pound lean, boneless
beef roast, trimmed of
all fat
1 tablespoon oil
3 cups boiling water
1 cup orange juice
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons brown sugar
% teaspoon ground
cinnamon
% teaspoon ground ginger
1 pound carrots, scraped
and cut into 2-inch
sections
3 large sweet potatoes,
peeled and cut into
1-inch chunks
1 medium butternut
squash, peeled and cut
into 1-inch chunks
About 8 ounces pitted
prunes
About 5 ounces dried
apricots
About 1 pound boneless,
skinless chicken breast
halves
Cornstarch and cold water
(optional)
In a 6-quart or larger oven-
proof soup pot or Dutch oven,
heat the oil; then brown the
roast on all sides. Drain off
any excess fat. Add the water,
juice, honey, and brown sugar.
Bring to a boil, covered; then
lower the heat and simmer
about 1 hour. Remove the pot
from the heat, and turn on
the oven to 350 degrees. Use
a spoon to skim off any fat
from the surface of the meat
broth. Stir the cinnamon and
ginger into the broth; then
randomly arrange the carrots,
sweet potatoes, squash,
prunes and apricots around
and on top of the roast. Baste
all with some of the beef
broth.
Cover, and bake in the
350-degree oven for about 2 to
3 hours or until the meat is
fork tender. Use a slotted
spoon to remove the vege-
tables and fruit from the pot,
and arrange them in a large
serving casserole. Carefully
transfer the meat to a platter
or carving board. Put the
chicken breasts into the
broth, and simmer them,
covered, on the top of the
stove for about 15 minutes or
until they are cooked
through. Meanwhile, cut the
roast into thick slices and ar-
range with the vegetables.
When the chicken breasts are
ready, remove them with a
slotted spoon and add them to
the serving casserole. If the
broth is not thick enough for
a gravy, mix together 1
tablespoon each of cornstarch
and water, and stir add into
the simmering broth. If still
not thick enough, add more
thickener as needed. Pour the
hot gravy over all. Makes
about 8 to 10 servings.



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