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September 23, 1988 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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tc1 S„,4
V • Building A Sukkah In The

,

Each month in this space, L'Chayim will present a Yiddish lesson
entitled "Du Redst Yiddish (Do You Speak Yiddish?)" whose aim is to
encourage further study of Yiddish. The lesson will include a brief story
utilizing the Yiddish words to be studied, a vocabulary list with English
translations and a family activity which involves using the new words. Two
books which may be helpful for beginning Yiddish students are Yiddish for
Beginners by Dr. Joffen and Der Yiddisher Lerer by Goldin. Weinreich's
English-Yiddish Dictionary also may be useful.
The lessons were prepared by Mary Koretz of Oak Park. She has
taught both children's and adult classes in Yiddish at the Workmen's Circle.
Following is this month's lesson:
Jinny, Jennifer and Ben are three friendly shcheynim who attend the
same zuntik school. One tog the lever told them about Sukkot. She
derklert that we build sukkot as a symbolic havaye, a remembrance of a
time when we were an ehrdarbeit society and the feierung of the shnit. At
that time the sukkah was used as a derveiliker shelter, a place for the
workers to eat or rest, when they were too veit from the main farmhouse.
The three kinder asked their fathers to boyen a sukkah in the
shulehoyf. The fathers agree and came frie Sunday morning. They built
three zeitin and a steleh. The ceiling was made so that mahn could zehn
the moon and shtehrin at night and the sun beitog. When the shilers
came to school, they decorated the sukkot.
They strung fahrshidineh fruits, apples, mahrantsn, feign, grapes and

Schoolyard

vegetables symbolizing the harvest. They also hobn gehnitst leaves and
made a beautiful long kayt from colored paper. They scattered harteh
candies for a zis year. When they were through, they all admired their
handiwork. Then they ate it!

Vocabulary

shcheynim
zuntik
tog
lerer
derklert
havaye
ehrdarbeit
feierung
shnit
.
derveiliker
veit
kinder
boyen
shulehoyf
frie
zeitin
steleh

neighbors
Sunday
day
teacher
explained
gesture
agricultural
celebration
harvest
temporary
far
children
build
schoolyard
early
sides
ceiling

mahn
zehn
shtehrin
beitog
shilers
fahrshidineh
mahrantsn
feign
hobn gehnitst
kayt
harteh
zis

one (as in person)
see
stars
by day
students
various
oranges
figs
used
chain
hard
sweet

Family Activity

If you have access to a sukkah,
invite someone who doesn't to
share in the holiday celebration. If
you don't have a sukkah, visit one
at a synagogue.

Torah Cover For Laura In Time For Simchat Torah

By PHYLLIS ANN MEER
When Laura began the
synagogue Sunday school she was
delighted to receive her very own
Sefer Torah. Laura had known about
the Torah for a long time. She could
picture her Daddy's Sefer Torah. It
was smaller than hers, but it had
lovely red wooden handles. The
writing was all in Hebrew. (Laura's
Sefer Torah was written in Hebrew
and English.) Her Daddy had saved
his Torah from when he was a very
small boy.
When Laura was old enough to
go to the synagogue she had seen
the Torahs on Shabbat. She loved
to see the beautiful Torah covers
with their shiny crowns. She loved
to hear the pretty melody that the
cantor sang as the Torah was lifted
up high for everyone to see.
Laura loved to open and close
her Torah. She looked for pictures,
letters and then words that she
could recognize.
One day she could not find the
plastic Torah cover that came with
her Torah. She looked everywhere
in her room but could not find it
anywhere.
The next Shabbat the rabbi
asked the children to bring their
Sefer Torahs every week to the
services. Laura did not want to
bring hers without a cover. She
thought about different ways to
cover the Torah. "Paper" she
thought, "could rip, and cardboard

L-8

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1988

would get soggy in the rain." She
looked around her room and saw
some doll clothes on her bed that
Mother had sewn. She thought to
herself, "maybe we could make a
cover from material."
She ran to her mother and
asked her if she could help her
make a cover for her Torah out of
cloth. Her mother thought that was
a great idea. Together they
searched through the box of
materials. Finally, at the bottom of
the box they found a.blue satin
material that would‘be just right.

Laura helped her mother to
measure the Torah. Mother cut out
the material that she would need.
Mother said, "If we work hard we
can finish it for Simchat Torah, the
holiday to celebrate the Torah."
Sparkly golden threads were
placed in four rows up and down
the Torah cover. A blue-trimmed
piece of lace bordered the top of
the Torah cover. Laura drew a
picture of a crown and mother cut it
out of cardboard. Together they
covered it with tin foil and decorated
it with tiny beads. Mother sewed
snaps on the back to make it easy
to remove the Torah cover. Finally it
was finished. Laura thanked her
mother for her help.
And now on Simchat Torah and
Shabbat Laura carries her
beautifully covered Sefer Torah with
pride.

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