100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 23, 1988 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PURELY COMMENTARY

'Yiddish Folksongs': Treasures Are Being Preserved

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

Editor Emeritus

R

espect for the publishing ini-
tiative and gratitude for the
the appearance of the four-
volume Anthology of Yiddish Folksongs.
The deep appreciation is for the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem for having
undertaken the sponsorship of this im-
mense work. We welcome it, with
gratitude to Emma Schaver for the
determination with which she pursued
the task of having the four volumes

Emma Schaver

published, and to Sinai Leachter who
is co-chairman of the committee that
made the preservation of the 380 Yid-
dish folksongs a reality.
Abba Kovner, who as leader of the
resistance in the Vilna Ghetto also
became its historian, adds impressive-
ly to these volumes with his perceptive
comments, his poetic enthusiasm em-
bodied in the introductory chapters, and
the guidance he gave to their
publication.
The songs that were heard in the
homes of the Yiddish-speaking com-

munities for perhaps two or more cen-
turies, especially the music of the
shtetl, now become the treasures of the
surviving generations. They are
presented in these large-format
volumes trilingually, in the Yiddish
original, in the Hebrew text and in the
English translations.
For a fuller appreciation of the great
values incorporated in the four volumes
of Anthology of Yiddish Folksongs,
perhaps "Die Shvue" ("The Oath") will
serve the desired purpose. In its tril-
ingual presentation, it is preserved in
the Hebrew University-published
works.

Several periods of musical dedica-
tion are represented in the collected
works. They are echoes of centuries of
devotion as well as suffering. They lead
up to the most recent responses to the
attempt to destroy and to terrify surviv-
ing Jews. The memories of the most re-
cent era of horrors are in the fourth
volume which contains the songs of the
Holocaust.
This is an especially moving portion
of the anthology because its chief spon-
sor, Detroiter Emma Schaver, sang
them in survivors' camps.
There are several subdivisions in
these anthological collections. They in-
clude songs of a vanished era — love
songs and cradle songs.
With the publication of the assembl-
ed folksongs and their preservation for
future generations and mankind, Em-
ma Schaver has added another land-
mark to her many achievements. As
opera and folksinger she enriched the
musical arts. She has to her credit the
publishing of important Jewish books
by Wayne State University Press with
the aid of the Morris and Emma
Schaver publishing Fund. Now she has
added to her publishing devotions the
issuance of the Yiddish folksongs by the
Hebrew University. It is one of
numerous accomplishments she has en-
couraged, aided by the Hebrew
University.
In the biographical sketch about
her in the Anthology of Yiddish

Continued on Page 40

11
iyaztir_t

=5w

DI SHVUE
THE OATH

J =

Moderato
Dm

Text: Sh. An-ski To -25 to :utpt,

88

A7

imammnam m minimmmitam mip ■ mmorimii Iko_4
0 ■ Im a

1.)

3ri - der

un shves- ter

Dm

fun

ar - bet

un noyt,

a

- le

vos zay - nen

tse -

F

AIMI=1

zeyt

=11.111111.1101111MIPMEMIS.

un

tse - shpreyt,

tsu - za - men,

tsu

-

za - men

di

A7

fla

- tert

fun

tso

-

tbm•mmi

fon

zi

iz greyt,

zi

Dm

rn, fun blut

iz

zi royt,

a

shvu - e, a shvu - e

oyf

D7

•h

7



0J

le

-

bn

ey - des

un

di

toyt.

likh - ti - ke

Fli - ml

un

shte

-

Gm

erd

rn,

vet undz

a

A7

shvu -

G7

he

e,

A7

rn,

a

shvu - e

fun

Dm

M.101
- 1•11111Will

6

0)

blut

un

fun

tre

rn,

1ZW-1 VIM CIPPI.
,1:11 17W171 rTali te7
,X.M?. X171 II'S

11:14:(7

ir< nlinp

!ni5r1 ryr.

,n.)117 ,779j1K 5t11 I'Vjn vnWx
,rinnx;:r niai4nrr vntrix
: - trjnr1 x ,11 71):p.) 17?1
! W 74 7I nrni rU7i

5 r3

,yp.. 5755

nis`772
111 1 -9 517 'VC IMIOS
•5/ 4 51 13”135 KW?

D 1 h1t7~1 )3 11711

71 P)7

rnir

shve - rn, mir

shve - rn,

m it

shve

-

rn.

vynnx 115 nvvorntu 11K ny-Inz
— trnnunix px 1.31ITYY 117. 11T 172$11 1.7 17K
X 1,11 PK '1 11$6 11 ,7177.3xm ,117731ST1Y
AM, 11 PX 1315m 115
116 t1amx55 'T
trly 11x 1m.75 TIN ran5ty x ,ran5tv x

,U 113 11X

:117153M

,11311 1131X U3111 1117 11X 17)371

— 11313

vp1t,n15
n1-Tv
115 lix 315m 116 raniz; K ,ra15w x
!runitu -rn ,runitri
,111711V/ 1 173

However distant love and peace may be, sooner or later they will surely come,
for it is no dream!

I hear the song of love and joy, the mighty sound of every note proclaims the
rising of the sun.

The night is long, but the world is full of hope and cheer and yearning. I
hear a voice calling in the air for a blissful, joyous dawning.

How Parents Learn When Sharing Children's Books

B

ooks for young readers attain
high merit when they are infor-
mative, and planned to provide
factual data. Responsibly prepared,
they gain value as texts to be shared
with parents who read and study with
children and enrich knowledgeability.
In that fashion a volume for young
readers about Israel and her people
earns a high rating. In one of the newest
works for young readers issued by the
Jewish Publication Society, A Kid's
Catalog of Israel, the author, Chaya M.
Burstein, illustrates the record of
achievements, life in the land, the dai-
ly activities and the related humor with
commendable skill.
Author Burstein is anthologist and
artist. Her new JPS volume is filled
with illustrations which add delight to

2

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1988

the historic facts and biographical sket-
bearded Jews in black coats
ches which dominate her historic collec-
and hats who study Bible and
tive sense.
pray all the time
A young tourist making his way
• Israel is a land of history,
through Israel will find A Kid's Catalog
filled with ruins, holy places,
of Israel is an indispensable guide. The
and archaeologists.
author's few lines of introduction are
All those strange ideas are
valuably descriptive. She points out:
true. Israel is all of those things
— and much more.
People have some strange
ideas about Israel, ideas like
Ibpography is treated illuminative-
these:
ly in this fact-filled volume. Here is how
• Israel is a land of deserts,
Burstein shares the assembled data
camel caravans, and Arab
with the reader:
sheiks riding white horses.
• Israel is 6,000 miles from
• Israel is settled by brave
New York City and 9,000 miles
pioneers who drain swamps all
from Los Angeles.
day and sing Hebrew songs and
• It sits in the middle of the
dance the hora (round dance) all
Middle East, in southwest Asia.
night.
• It has an area of about
• Israel is the home of pious,
8,000 square miles, as big as the

state of Massachusetts.
• It contains one big river —
Continued on Page 40

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
(US PS 275-520) is published every Friday
with additional supplements the fourth
week of March, the fourth week of August
and the second week of November at
20300 Civic Center Drive, Southfield,
Michigan.

Second class postage paid at Southfield,
Michigan and additional mailing offices.

Postmaster: Send changes to:
DETROIT JEWISH NEWS, 20300 Civic
Center Drive, Suite 240, Southfield,
Michigan 48076

$26 per year
$33 per year out of state
60' single copy

Vol. XCIV No. 4

September 23, 1988

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan