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September 16, 1988 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

X tomeig■atintaevl

HELP THE
MICHIGAN HUMANE SOCIETY
LICK ANIMAL ABUSE.

PHOTOGRAPHY

From wilful neglect to outright torture,
animal abuse takes many forms. But
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a desperate attempt to save helpless
lives. 'Ile Michigan I lumane Society
carries that light to the street, rescuing
abandoned and abused animals and, if
necessary, to the State Supreme Court.
Wherever the fight takes pl., it
expensive.
Your contribution makes Michigan
a better place for animals to live and
a bettor place for people to live.
Because ultimately, the fight against
animal abuse is a fight for simple human
decency.
"together we can lick animal abuse.
Permanently.

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UP FRONT

`Miss Daisy'

Continued from Page 5

for which he served as
"editor-in-chief, feature
editor, editorial editor —
everything," he said.
He also went to the movies
as often as possible, a passion
he still holds today; "Tender
Mercies," "Breaker Morant,"
"Big" and "The Godfather"
are among his favorites.
Uhry's transformation from
journalist to playwright oc-
cured in his youth, although
his earliest plays did not
result in the resounding suc-
cess of "Driving Miss Daisy."
While in high school he
wrote the book, lyrics and
music for a comedy he also
produced and directed.
He wrote several other
works, too — "those sort of
`Mickey and Judy, let's put on
a show!' kinds of things," he
said.
The music for these plays is
lost because Uhry never put
a note to paper. "I didn't know
you wrote music down," he
admitted.
Yet some of the scripts may
still lurk in his mother's
home. "I'm sure she still has
some of them," Uhry said.
"But she'll reveal them on the
pain of death?'
As an undergraduate at
Brown University, Uhry con-
tinued his interest in the
theater, writing two musicals
with Robert Waldman.
After graduating, he settled
in New York with his wife,
Joanna. He and Waldman got
jobs writing music for adver-
tisements and television
shows, including "Hootenan-
ny Saturday Night."
Although he accepted a
position teaching English and
theater at the Calhoun
School, Uhry never abandon-
ed his writing. One of his

Midrasha Library

Continued from Page 5

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22

THE CHECKMATE COLLECTION

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1988

w

qq

I

not appropriate when it
comes to community dollars."
He said he could not predict
when the study committee
will issue its
recommendations.
"The library is not going to
be a back-burner item," he
added.
Loebl and others are upset
because Bell, after 20 years as
Midrasha librarian, has had
her work hours cut and
benefits eliminated.
Nachman responded that
Bell's case will be addressed
"after the facts are ascertain-
ed." He added that he has no
personal feelings about Bell's
plight.
After the holidays, the
Midrasha Library's hours will
be 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., Sun-
days and Thursdays.

Alfred Uhry: Books, not blockades

greatest successes was "The
Robber Bridegroom," for
which he wrote the dialogue.
He was subsequently
nominated for a Tony Award.
In the early 1980s, Uhry
began working at the
Goodspeed Opera House,
where one of his projects was
a musical about Al Capone.
But Uhry had little interest
in gangsters.
"I had no real feeling for
the material," he said. "So I
decided I might as well write
something I care about."
That something was "Driv-
ing Miss Daisy."
Initially, Uhry kept the pro-
ject to himself, telling only
his wife about the play. When
it was finished, Uhry took
"Miss Daisy" to his agent
"because my wife loved it so?'

His agent shared her en-
thusaism, telling Uhry, "I
love it and I can sell it." Just
four months later, it went in-
to production at a not-for-
profit theater.
Actress Julie Harris, who
will play the title role in the
Detroit production of "Driv-
ing Miss Daisy," called it "the
perfect play."
"Driving Miss Daisy" has
proved a great success not on-
ly with Uhry's wife, his agent
and the critics, but with the
playwright's mother.
"I think she's glad it's not
gooey," he said, "and that I
didn't oversentimentalize.
She said it really captures the
tenor of what happened in
those times."
Uhry believes the late
gentleman on whom the
chauffer in "Driving Miss
Daisy" is based also would
have liked the play. "He was
the closest thing I ever had to
a grandfather," he said. "I lov-
ed him dearly."
Uhry also loves the fans.
Unlike some stars who ap-
parently would rather cross
the Himalayas without food
or water and wearing only a
sheet rather than give fans

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