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September 16, 1988 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I LOCAL NEWS

YOU'RE COVERED

With Our New T-Shirt!

Pollard Feature
Wins Smolar Award

Jewish News contributor
Michael Elkin also won in the
public affairs category. They
are "Terrorism and TV News"
and "Thrror on Film."
"Probing the Netherworld
of a Jew Accused of Nazi War
Crimes" by Arthur J. Magida
took the prize in the human
interest category. That story
appeared in the June 26,
1987, Jewish News.
Andrew Jolles won an
award for his human interest
entry, "AIDS and the Silent
Jewish Majority," which was
published in B'nai B'rith
Jewish Monthly. Howard
Goodman took the science,
medicine history and
research prize for "Medical
Ethics and Animals," which
appeared in Insight.

STAFF REPORT

A

merican Prisoner of
Zion," a profile of con-
victed spy Jonathan
Jay Pollard, won the Smolar
Award for public affairs
journalism.
The article, by Staff Writer
David Holzel, appeared in the
June 26, 1987, issue of The
Jewish News.
The story was one of five
winners, selected from 58 sub-
missions. The award is spon-
sored annually by the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations. It is
named in memory of Boris
Smolar, editor-in-chief
emeritus of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
Two articles by frequent

Voter Study Prompts
Registration Drive

KIMBERLY LIFTON

Staff Writer

A

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12

STATE

J

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1988

larmed by recent stat-
istics that show one
million Jews in the
United States do not vote,
rabbis and other Jewish
, leaders are joining a national
registration drive to combat a
possible drop in the Jewish
vote in November.
The community mobiliza-
tion drive follows a study by
the Synagogue Council of
America which states that 25
percent of the nation's four
million eligible Jewish voters
are not registered. In fact, the
study says, thousands of
registered Jewish voters fail
to cast ballots.
Targeted as non-voters is
the 18 to 25-year-old age
group, mostly those in urban
areas and those who moved to
the Sunbelt cities from the
Northeast and Midwest.
Jewish voters, the study
states, historically have not
joined a national trend of
eligible voters who do not
paricipate in local, state and
national elections. For
decades, 90 percent of eligible
Jewish voters cast" their
ballots in national elections,
the SCA says. As a result,
says Gilbert Kahn, a domestic
affairs consultant for the SCA
who worked on the survey,
the American Jewish com-
munity has held major
political influence.
But Kahn says American
Jewish community political
involvement throughout the
country is waning. Results of

the study, he says, show that
the current estimated 70 per-
cent registration rate will
continue to plummet.
The study, conducted by the
SCA and the New York
Jewish Community Relations
Council, shows that rates of
voter registration among
members of tested
synagogues in southern
Florida has reached as low as
37 percent in some areas. The
study indicates that Jewish
registration rates were at 55
to 75 percent for the 1984
election in New York City,
which comprises the largest
population of Jews in the
country.
"When we are dealing with
a community that makes up
just 2.8 percent of the nation's
population, any drop in
voting numbers is significant
in our ability to have an im-
pact on issues' of critical im-
portance to the survival of the
Jewish community," says
Miriam Schey, a community

-

affairs associate with the
Jewish Community Council
of Metropolitan Detroit.
lb offset the trend, the
JCCouncil and the Jewish
War Veterans have launched
community-wide registration
drives. And rabbis
throughout the city have us-
ed the bimah during Shabbat
and High Holy Day services
to encourage congregation
members to vote.
"Up until now, we assumed
that Jews just voted in large
numbers," says Rabbi Irwin
Groner of Congregation
Shaarey Zedek, a vice presi-

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