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September 09, 1988 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MAY THE COMING YEAR BE
FILLED WITH HEALTH AND
HAPPINESS FOR ALL OF
OUR CUSTOMERS
FAMILY AND
FRIENDS.

VIENNA WHOLESALE DELICATESSEN

MARTY & CAROL COOK

INSIDE WASHINGTON

`60 Minutes' Plans To Thrn
Its Spotlight On AIPAC

JAMES DAVID BESSER

Washington Correspondent

T

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-

NTEERS
FOR ISRAEL

Invites you to join with us
A MUSICAL MASTERPIECE AT

MASADA

The Grand Finale of Israel's 40th Anniversary Celebration
at the foot of the mountain of Masada in Israel
Host:
Special Guest:

Gregory Peck

Yves Montand

The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

conducted by

Zubin Mehta

This extraordinary celebration of
Israel's 40th Anniversary will
be a part of our regular

With Summer
Over, Lobbies
Gear Up Again

3 WEEK WORK/CULTURAL PROGRAM

As senators and con-
gressmen return from their
summer wanderings, their
"in-boxes" will be groaning
under the weight of controver-
sial issues involving the
Jewish community.
Several Jewish activists
here expect some kind of
legislative effort to thwart the
rumored visit of VAssir Arafat
to New York and Washington.
Already pro-Israel groups
here are marshalling their

October 11 - Returning Nov. 1, 8 & 15

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— FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED!



For further information:

ISRAEL PROGRAM CENTER
661-5440

30

most political
groups, publicity is a
basic nutrient. But
one group here — the
American Israel Public Af-
fairs Committee (AIPAC) —
shuns the limelight with a
determination that often
drives reporters to distrac-
tion.
So it was bad news on North
Capitol Street when the ad-
vance team for Sixty Minutes
rolled into town last week to
lay the groundwork for a seg-
ment on the pro-Israel lobby-
ing group.
Worse, from AIPAC's point
of view, is that Mike Wallace
will anchor the segment.
Wallace is well known for his
ferocious interviewing style.
He is also known for having
crossed swords with AIPAC in
the past.
In part, AIPAC's shyness
with the media is based on its
belief that the American
public would not look with
favor on the techniques that
are basic to every lobbying
group, Jewish and non-Jew-
ish. There is also suspicion
that widespread publicity
about the powerful group
would play into traditional
anti-Semitic stereotypes.
The group is sensitive about
the fuzzy connection between
lobbying groups and political
action committees, which
distribute money to can-
didates — reportedly a major
focus of the Sixty Minutes in-
vestigation.
' A number of Jewish ac-
tivists around town have been
contacted to appear on the
segment; so far, the Sixty
Minutes crew has had a dif-
ficult time lining up people
willing to express their opin-
ions on AIPAC under the
glare of TV lights.

.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1988

LEE SHLOM
661-4285

Michael Dukakis marches in memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on
Aug. 27, accompanied by Dr. Benjamin Hoods, the Rev. Joseph Lowery,
Kitty Dukakis and Andrew Young

arguments to convince Con-
gress to apply pressure on the
State Department to reject —
at the very least — the ex-
pected request for a visa for
the Washington trip.
Late last week, Washington
sources reported that the Na-
tional Press Club, which
issued an invitation for the
PLO leader to speak, will not
push hard to get a visa for
Arafat. But pro-Israel legisla-
tors are conceding that deny-
ing a visa for the U.N.
appearance will be almost im-
possible — especially in view
of the rumored changes in the
PLO bargaining position.
Congress will also plunge
into the controversy over the
action of the U.S. Trade
Representative putting Israel
on a list of nations to be in-
vestigated for labor abuses.
At the very least, Congress-
watchers expect "dear col-
league" letters from both
houses — and possibly hear-
ings on the decision.
And the Kuwait arms deal
will continue to generate
heat, despite last month's
compromise that supposedly
eliminated the weapons most
threatening to Israel and
deferred the delivery of
several other weapons
systems.
But the bill is facing stiff
opposition from groups like
the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce and the National Asso-
ciation of Manufacturers.
Nevertheless, Moshenberg
said, the bill is gaining a
measure of bi-partisan sup-
port. "You have a situation
where Congress is doing all it
can to get people off the
public assistance roles. This is
a bill that would allow people
who are employed to keep

those jobs in the face of short-
term family crises. As a
result, we feel this should be
a top priority!'
Last week, word was cir-
culating in Washington that
Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.)
and Sen. Dennis DeConcini
(D-Ariz.) would continue to
fight the deal, despite the
stamp of approval by most
pro-Israel groups here.

Candidates
Vague On
Agudah Poll

Agudath Israel of America,
the Orthodox group that is
trying to build a strong
presence in Washington,
recently released the results
of a questionnaire sent to the
two presidential candidates.
Not surprisingly, the ques-
tions tell a lot about the
group's political agenda,
which focuses heavily on
domestic issues and the moral
questions that are adding a
new layer of complexity to
discussion of policy issues.
At the top of Agudah's list
is the issue that motivates
most of Agudah's lobbying —
private education. In re-
sponse to a question, Vice
President George Bush in-
dicated that he favored tui-
tion tax credits for private
education; Gov. Michael
Dukakis voiced his support of
private education for reli-
gious groups, but argued that
in an era of rising federal
deficits, federal aid to private
schools would only "draw ad-
ditional resources away from
our public schools!'
Bush artfully dodged a
question the right of sec-
tarian organizations to offer

-41

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