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September 09, 1988 - Image 236

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS I

IMI111 ■ 1,

SHIVA BASKETS .. .

‘/\/e Will Always Be There‘
When You Need Us
For A Beautiful Shiva Tray

'

WITH GOOD TASTE

STAR DELI •

THE
GREAT AMERICAN
BASKET CO.

OPEN 7 DAYS 7 a.m. to 10 p.rfi.

\

24555 W. 12 MILE

WE
DELIVER

., Just west of Telegraph

non
nom

352-7377d

(313) 626-9050

,?.11 1 1 1

uoPillur
W. VII

INN 110 .10 OW No•VIMIONI

IN MIMI MMMMMM WHEW

New
in
town?

Bees are busy at work making honey.

Honey Popular In Israel
Leading Export Item

D'VORA BEN SHAUL

Special to the Jewish News

4 11I erusalem — When the

Shalom
Detroit
is here
to welcome
you!

For information:
Jewish
Welfare
Federation

965-3939

THE HEBREW BENEVOLENT SOCIETY

(Chesed Shel Emes)

Invites the

GREATER DETROIT JEWRY

to participate in a

MEMORIAL SERVICE

for the Six Million Jews who perished in Europe at the Hands of the Nazis, which will be held on

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1988, 12:00 NOON
at the HEBREW MEMORIAL PARK

(Chesed Shel Emes Cemetery) Gratiot and Fourteen Mile Rd.

RABBI MORTON YOLKUT
of CONGREGATION B'NAI DAVID
and CANTOR BEN-ZION LANXNER

of CONGREGATION BETH ABRAHAM HILLEL MOSES

Samuel P. Havis

President

Milton Oleinick
Ernest Greenfield

Louis P. Topor

Treasurer

Vice-Presidents

Eric Greenbaum

Secretary

A. M. Silverstein
Charles Snow
Melville Richman

Edward Miller

Cemetery Chairman

Trustees

Michael I. Hochheiser

Alan H. Dorfman

Rabbi Boruch E. Levin

Cemetery Administrator

Funeral Director

Executive Director

228

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1988

spies that were sent
into Canaan returned
to base, they spoke of a land
flowing with milk and honey.
This sweet (throughout most
of mankind's history the on-
ly sweet available aside from
fruits), has always been
treasured and modern Israeli
beekeepers are finding that
despite alternative sugars
and diet-conscious popula-
tions, honey still remains
highly popular with local con-
sumers and as an export item.
Although a good part of the
2,000 tons of honey exported
from Israel each year is pro-
duced by the large apiaries of
kibbutzim, there are also a
large number of private
apiaries, ranging from small
enterprises of a dozen hives or
to those with hundreds of
hives. Israeli Arabs and
residents of the administered
territories are among some of
the most successful of the
private beekeepers but it took
them a while to accept that in
Israel all hives have to be
licensed.
The licensing is required in
order to make sure that one
apiast does not graze his or
her (many good beekeepers
are women) bees on another's
"pasture" and to allow for
veterinary inspection of hives.
Bee diseases are taken
seriously and hives may not
be moved from one area to
another until certified as
healthy.
But honey itself is only one
bee product produced for local
consumption and for export.
One of the most expensive
side products of the hive is
Royal Jelly, a material
secreted by juvenile female
bees and used to feed the
queen throughout her life.

.

This jelly is highly prized as
a food and as a cosmetic
additive.

Pollen from wild flowers is
also collected from the hives
and sold in health food stores
as a protein supplement for
vegetarians and, of course,
the wax from the honeycombs
is in high demand both for
making honeycomb bases and
for superior candles. One of
the most interesting hive pro-
ducts is prophylis, a black
tarry wax secreted by bees
and used as a caulking
material in the hive. This
material is used by
homeopaths and naturopaths
since it has a strong ger-
micidal and mild antibiotic
action.
For many apiasts, however,
pollination is where the real
business is. There are a
number of crops, particularly
citrus, cucumber, melon,
alfalfa and clover, that must
be pollinated by bees. Every
year in spring and autumn,
as Israel's two growing
seasons approach, thousands
of hives are hired for pollina-
tion and beekeepers all over
the country are besieged with
calls from kibbutzim,
moshavim and private
planters.
Sometimes, if a hive is not
immediately available, a
farmer may have to delay
planting for a couple of weeks.
Israeli honey comes in a
variety of flavors and honey
lovers are choosy about which
kind they want. Consequent-
ly, some expert apiasts
specialize. There is wildflower
honey from the hills of the
Galilee, and the earthy after-
taste and scent of a summer
field, eucalyptus honey, stark-
ly pale and lightly tangy,
carob honey, dark and full
bodied, wild herbal honey
from the oregano plants in
the Jerusalem hills.

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