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September 09, 1988 - Image 117

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I BEST OF EVERYTHING I

ra-11 7171177RTRIENDS & CUSTOMERS A VERY HAPPY NEV7E;11

Welcome to . . .

I OPEN 7 DAYS I

li

I a

Family Dining

27167 GREENFIELD, JUST NORTH OF 11 MILE

559-8222

TWO•FOR-ONE BREAKFAST & LUNCH MENU

Served from 7:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

ALL OMELETTES SERVED WITH HASH BROWNS & TOAST

TWO-FOR-ONE LUNCH & DINNER MENU

Served From 7 a m. to 10:00 p.m. . . . WITH SOUP OR SALAD. RICE OR POTATOES

10% OFF EARLY BIRD NEW MENU!

ANYBODY! ANY AGE!

DINNER SPECIALS

(Except 2 For 1 And Early Bird Specials)

2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

• American & Lebanese
• Daily Specials

SAME LOW
PRICES!

NO COUPON
NECESSARY! '

BEST WISHES TO OUR CUSTOMERS
AND FRIENDS FOR A

HEALTHY & HAPPY NEW YEAR

COMPARE ANYWHERE! . IF YOU WANT THE BEST — GIVE US A TEST!

[ OPEN 7 DAYS-SUN.THURS 11.10

ASTED

I DINE IN & CARRY-OUT AVAILABLE I

WHOLE
BROASTED
OR
BAR-B-Q

I FRI:SAT. 11-11

I

co
co

d)

CHICKEN
FOR 2
$795

w

118 SOUTH WOODWARD • ROYAL OAK

JUST NORTH OF 10 MILE NEXT TO ZOO

544-1211

QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY IS OUR PRIORITY!

=ail rum

erO

ROSE and IRVING GUTTMAN,
Family & Staff
Of

IRVING'S

FAMILY DINING

IN LA MIRAGE MALL

29555 NORTHWESTERN HWY., BET. 12 & 13 MILE

352 3840

-

Join In Extending Most Sincere
Wishes For a Joyful

NEW YEAR

May the call of the Shofar herald
a message of peace for the entire world.

We thank you for your gracious patronage .. .
and most sincerely wish the very best in
health, happiness, joy and prosperity to all

We Will Close
Sun., Sept. 11 at 3 p.m.
Reopen Wed., Sept. 14 at 7 a.m.

We Will Close
Tues., Sept. 20 at 3 p.m.
Reopen Thurs., Sept. 22 at 7 a.m.

1

76

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1988

••• ■■ •••• ■ I

Concerts

Continued from Page 74

Queens, dancers . . . plus, of
course, Cab's orchestra.
The Duke Ellington Or-
chestra led by his Mercer Ell-
ington, comes in Jan. 7 .. .
Frank Foster leads the Count
Basie Orchestra in the March
11 engagement.

NATION'S RESTAU-
RANT News is usually pret-
ty accurate . .. and its April
11 issue points out some top
beefs, as written by Marilyn
Alva.
Eating out in a restaurant
is supposed to be an uplifting
occasion, but for many a diner
it provides more reason for
staying home, according to a
new Nation's Restaurant
News survey.
"The latest NRN/SRI Poll
finds that customers have a
host of gripes about eating
out in restaurants, ranging
from slow service to hair in
the food or ugly uniforms.
Faulty service, however, was
cited as the biggest peeve
among a random sampling of
American consumers in a
survey conducted by SRI
Research Center Inc. in Lin-
coln, Neb.
"Questioned on their pet
peeves on eating out in
restaurants, 15 percent said
`slow service; five percent
answered 'poor service,' and
another five percent cited
`surly waiters and waitresses?
"Smaller numbers recalled
`intrusive' service and the
wait help as being either 'too
personal' or not attentive
enough. "Other aspects of the
restaurant experience that ir-
ritated respondents were high
prices and smoking, followed
by bad-tasting food and cold
meals.
"Some 1,000 consumers
over 18 were contacted by
telephone during February
and asked, 'What is your pet
peeve about eating out in
restaurants?'
"While service topped the
complaint list, followed by
smoking and food, the people
SRI contacted had a number
of other gripes about eating
out in restaurants.
"For example, 17 of the
respondents said they were
bothered by children.
Another 13 didn't like the
crowds, while still another 13
cited dirty tables and
utensils.
"A handful held general
grudges such as 'the other
diners' and 'other people wat-
ching me eat' while another
handful cited 'afraid of AIDS'
and 'not enough food.'
"About 25 people said they
were distressed by 'general
unsanitary conditions: while
one respondent's pet peeve
was 'handling money at the
table.' "
The top 10 pet peeves listed

were . . . slow service, too ex-
pensive, poor service, surly
waiters/waitresses, smokers,
bad tasting, served cold,
general unsanitary condi-
tions, children and too noisy.

THE MYSTERY MUN-
CHER WRITES . . . -
"For elegant Mediterra-
nean dining in Windsor, La
Guardia on Pitt Street is a
good bet. Specialties include
a wide variety of pasta dishes,
veal scallops, scampi and
charcoal grilled shrimp. The
tortellini in La Guardia sauce
is a blend of cheese, cream,
fresh peas and prosciutto.
"Good fresh lobster isn't
that easy to get in Detroit
area restaurants. You could
pick out your lobster from a
tank at Ciungan's, a
downriver institution that
burned down a few months
ago. Ciungan's was aging,
wasn't much to look at and
was off the beaten track on
Southfield Road in Ecorse.
But the portions were
generous, the seafood was
first rate and the prices
reasonable. Hope the
restaurant comes back.
"Another place we miss is
the Good Earth in Tally Hall
on Orchard Lake and 14 Mile.
There was a fresh, pungent,
spicy aroma in the restaurant
which set the pace for the tas-
ty food, homemade breads
and a variety of tea and cof-
fee. It didn't cost much to en-
joy this attractive dining spot.
But, for some reason, the
Good Earth bit the dust.
"While there are plenty of
retail health food stores
around to accomodate the diet
conscious, the number of
health food restaurants are
few. Some establishments pro-
vide a light menu or a heart
symbol beside cholesteral-free
items. Beef consumption ap-
pears to be down while the
trend continues to be towards
fish and seafood. Eating raw
shellfish, however, is taking
some risk, according to
experts.
"You'll find more Chinese
restaurants in the area than
any other. Most folks ask for
their food without corn starch
or MSG for the sake of diet.
When you consider that
Orientals have a low in-
cidence of heart disease and
other food-related illnesses, it
makes sense to sample native
dishes, including rice."

"It's worth the ride over to
Windsor to frequent Cook's
Shop on Ouelette. This place,
tucked away in a corner, is
dark and romantic. As you
enter, you pass an open grill
where beef and seafood are
flaming. The atmosphere is
rustic with brick and woods.
Chefs are pasta masters.

ri

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