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September 02, 1988 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

!ANALYSIS I

Fall "88"

Brings Back the
Feminine Shape in Rich Fabrics
For that Contemporary Lady

29107 Northwestern Highway
at 12 Mile • Franklin Plaza

Mon.-Fri. 10-4
Sot. 10-3

Jews And Judaism
Are Entering New Age

358-4085

(I)

ROBERT E. SEGAL

BAUME & MERCIER

Special to The Jewish News

GENEVE

Yes, there really is a

RE-DISCOVER
ATLANTIS.

A 14K gold watch that's
ultra-slim, quartz accurate,
and water-resistant to 99 ft.
Available with 14K gold
bracelet or lizard strap.
One of the incomparable
treasures of the world....
from Baume & Mercier.

ROSLYN!

And she's the person, along with
her personally trained staff of ex-
perts who can make your fall
fashions look so much better!
The right bra for whatever your
dress dictates. Backless,
strapless, halter, we'll solve the
problem — Hemlines mini to
midi, straight or flared, we've got
it licked! BRING US THE
DRESS, WE'LL DO THE REST!
For the best selection of under-
fashions, sleepwear, loungewear,
leisurewear, let us be your one-
stop shopping store.

See you at
Roslyn's Intimate Apparel.

APPLEGATE SQUARE
29847 NORTHWESTERN HWY.
SOUTHFIELI MI
356.7007

Intimate Apparel

THE BRIGHT IDEA

send

THE JEWISH NEWS

as a gift

8lyn

354 6060

-

APPLEGATE SQUARE

Northwestern at Inkster

Daily 10-5:30, Thurs. 10-8

353-5522

A new choice for the frail elderly

Independent Living with
Supportive Services

A new caring alternative for
the frail elderly is now
available at the exciting new
and elegant West Bloomfield
Nursing and Convalescent
Center.

• Deluxe semi-private or private
mini suites all with private
baths and a beautiful view of
a courtyard or wooded
grounds.

• Town Center Plaza with a
It's called Independent Living
snack shop, beauty salon,
with Supportive Services. It's
flower and gift shop and an
the choice between
old-fashioned ice cream parlor.
independent living and skilled
nursing care for the elderly
• Fine dining in an elegant
person who needs the
dining area with meals
essentials of living such as
prepared by an executive chef
housekeeping service, meals,
laundry service and
and served by a courteous,
friendly staff
medication, if needed.
Licensed nurses are on duty 24
hours a day.
• Exciting and varied activities,
planned and supervised, to
Residents in this program can
keep
residents involved and
enjoy a relaxed, elegant
happy
atmosphere that includes:

Honor us with o visit. Weekdoys 9 o.m-8 p.m.
Soturday & 5undoy, noon-5 p.m.
An Affiliate of William Beaumont Hospital

(9•1

West 01919mAhLill arven9

and 0

50

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1988

i}entet-

• Pastoral and weekly Sabbath
services provided by Rabbi
Moshe Palter

6445 West Maple • West Bloomfield, MI
Phone: 661-1600

B

oston — While the
Middle East crisis
continues to be the up-
permost problem in the minds
of the majority of America's
5,800,000 Jews, it is im-
perative that we take a closer
look at changing patterns of
Jewish life here and give
thought to the formidable
challenges that lie before us.
A valuable guide for such
considerations, based on a
21-city, wide-ranging and
fruitful study by two Brandeis
scholars — Dr. Sylvia Barack
Fishman and Dr. Gary 'Robin
— is both revealing and now
available.
When I heard this pair lec-
ture recently, I was startled to
learn of the rapidity of change
in Jewish educational, social,
and institutional develop-
ments. Much that can be
gleaned from these two com-
petent researchers points up
grave questions about Jewish
survival.
The observations that
follow flow from the Brandeis
study and several other
reliable sources.
We have come into a new
age of single-parent Jewish
families; a time in which it
may be necessary to merge
synagogues and temples at a
faster rate; an era in which,
Jewish boys and girls who go
off to colleges in un-
precedented numbers will be
more likely to choose law
school and graduate business
school education and no
longer be attracted, as often
as in the past, to careers in
medicine.
Gone is the era when
thousands of American Jews
were making their living by
the skill of their hands. Union
membership days are over,
while the children andgrand-
children of those who belong-
ed are now in the professions.
Even the clergy leadership
is changing: Young women
are among the new cantors
and have also won rabbinical
status and pulpits.
But perhaps nothing has
changed so radically as the
family structure.
Marriages are delayed as
careers require time. Or esle
professional careers are team-
ed with marriage and child
rearing. The result is a search

Robert E. Segal is a former
newspaper editor as well as
former director of the
Jewish community councils
in Cincinnati and Boston.

for child care, a key fact of life
and for single female parents
especially, a dreadfully costly
factor. One of the obvious
answers is Jewish Centers,
which are seen as ideal loca-
tions for day care service.
The Fishman-Tobin study
reminds us that 35-40 percent
of Jewish marriages today are
to non-Jews. Thirty percent of
the non-Jewish partners will
4
convert to Judaism. Assimila-
tion, growing up in a mobile
and open society and match-
ed with a low birth rate fuel
efforts of religious leaders to
hope for and encourage
conversion.
It is estimated that 10,000
conversions to Judaism are
recorded annually today, as
1
compared with 5,000 20 years
ago. The Jewish divorce rate
of today would shock our
ancestors, and the rate in-
creases steadily as does the
rate of remarriage.
Fishman and Tobin con-
clude that as Jews advance in
years, they are more inclined
to seek out Jewish friends.
They point out also that
Passover is a leading factor in
cementing attachment to
Judaism.
Traditional religious life is
strong over the years for Pro-
I
testants and Catholics in con-
trast with the Jewish
.4
experience.
Whereas Jewish values,
4
especially those , based on
sound Jewish education, were
to a great degree instilled by
I
the family in the past, this
obligation has now fallen to
the synagogues and religious
schools.
4
Many would conclude that
outside hostile forces,
especially anti-Semitism, are
not as strong as in previous
eras. Yet as the post-
Holocaust period lengthens,
children's awareness of the
Holocaust declines.
Who can say whether our
once proud boast of Jewish
4
unity will endure? Often rab-
bis of Orthodox, Conservative,
and Reform affiliation ask:
"Are Jews still one people or
have the bonds of unity torn
us asunder?"
As Jews find it necessary to
devote more time to their
careers and provide a sound
education for their children,
Jewish institutions report a
lack of a strong corps of • d4
volunteers.
So we ask again: How cer-
tain are those who really care,
how realistic is the outlook
for vital Jewish survival?

-

Jewish Telegraphic Agency

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