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September 02, 1988 - Image 33

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

• Bloom so Bloom •

(- TRENDS

FALL FASHIONS
ARRIVING
DAILY

APPLEGATE
352-4244

On the surface, officials at
Foggy Bottom are concerned
about the international reper-
cussions of any unilateral
U.S. decision that might have
the effect of tampering with
the U.N. headquarters agree-
ment.
But just below the surface,
some observers sense an
almost imperceptible shift
within the State Department
in the direction of acknowl-
edging the leadership of the
PLO.
And this — along with
growing talk of a Palestinian
declaration of independence,
and the recent severance of of-
ficial ties between Jordan and
the West Bank — put the final
seal on the decision not to ap-
peal.
"The State Department has
always been opposed to the
closing," said one State
Department source. "But a
few months ago, they prob-
ably could not have per-
suaded the president to rule
against Justice; now, with the
events of the last few weeks,
I think they were able to
make their case more per-
suasively."

Jewish Groups
Want Universal
Registration

Voter registration has
always been a serious
political matter to the Jewish
community. Now, some Jew-
ish groups are getting in-
volved in legislation designed
to increase registration
among a variety of minority
groups.
Recently, the American
Jewish Committee and the
American Jewish Congress
came out in favor of the
Universal Voter Registration
Act of 1988, a measure
designed to insure a uniform
federal standard for voter
registration.
Procedures for registration
vary widely among states —
ranging from mail-in regi-
stration in California to no
registration at all in North
Dakota.
The current legislation
would mandate a single, sim-
ple standard for registration
for federal elections. As it
stands, the bill would allow
for registration on election
day — and for mail-in regi-
stration. The bill's primary
sponsors are Rep. John Con-
yers (D-Mich.) , Sen. Alan
Cranston (D-Calif.) and Sen.
Quentin N. Burdick (D-N.D.).
But a proposed amendment
by Rep. Al Swift (D-Wash.) is

being vigorously opposed by
the AJCommittee. Swift's
amendment would add provi-
sions linking easy registra-
tion to drivers licenses in an
effort to prevent registration
fraud.
"We're strongly concerned
that such an amendment
would pose serious problems
for the 10-15 percent of the
population that doesn't have
drivers licenses — primarily
poor people," said a Commit-
tee representative.

Jewish Fund
Gets Hate Mail

Black-Jewish relations
continue to be a vexing pro-
blem, a lesson that one
Jewish group here learned
with a vengeance recently.
The Jewish Fund for Jus-
tice, a group that provides
funding for a variety of social
action projects aimed at allev-
iating poverty, recently sent
out a direct mail solicitation
to 100,000 homes, primarily
Jewish.
"I was dismayed and dis-
traught by the kind of hate
mail we're getting back," said
Lois Roisman, the group's ex-
ecutive director. "And this
wasn't from non-Jews; it was
from Jews, asking how we
could give money to blacks, to
the non-Jews."
The Jewish Fund for
Justice is a three-year-old
philanthropy that concen-
trates its money on projects
emphasizing the causes, not
the symptoms of poverty.
"So we don't fund soup kit-
chens — but we do fund a
variety of education and ad-
vocacy projects," Roisman
said. "We emphasize projects
that lift people up to a better
life:'
Recently, the group pro-
vided funding for an inno-
vative project designed to give
black farmers in several
Southern states an opportuni-
ty to sell their produce in in-
ner cities, using synagogues
and black churches in those
communities to create mar-
kets. "This helps black
farmers stay on the land,"
Roisman said.
The group currently raises
about a half-million dollars a
year, primarily from individ-
uals. "And we've had wonder-
ful support from about 100
synagogues," Roisman said.
As for the angry mail from
Jews, Roisman believes that
the group's activities provide
an important boost to rela-
tions between Jews and other
minorities.

• Registered Electrologists •

Come and let us remove your unwanted hair problem and improve your appearance.

Near 12 Mile Rd. bet. Evergreen & Southfield

559-1969

Appt. Only.

Ask For Shirlee or Debby

Temple Beth El

We Want to
Belong to
Your
Family.

Here's what's waiting for you:

Michigan's oldest congregation—getting younger every day.

A vibrant, growing membership keeps Temple Beth El young, with
strong ideals and new ideas.

An excellent religious school—for students of all ages.

No matter how young or how old, our students enrich themselves by
studying their spiritual and cultural identity
■ Nursery School and Extended ■ Confirmation
Care
■ High School
■ Kindergarten
■ Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah
■ Complete Special Education
■ College of Jewish Studies
■ Bar/Bat Mitzvah
■ Weekly Torah Study

•A friendly place to pray and grow—a family of families.

Temple Beth El appeals to many groups for social and spiritual
fulfillment.
■ Middle Years Group
■ Young People's Society
■ Beth Elders
■ Singles
■ Mixed-Faith Families
■ Sisterhood and Brotherhood
Married
Group
■ Single-Parent Families


Rabbi Daniel Polish—a national leader in Reform Judaism.

Rabbi Polish comes to us from Temple Israel
in Los Angeles, where he was a respected
leader in the Reform Jewish community.

High Holy Days
Youth Services

Parents and youngsters 12 and under are
welcome at special youth services:
Rosh Hashanah Monday, September 12,
2:30 pm.
Yom Kippur Wednesday, September 21,
2:15 pm
Children 8 and under in the Sanctuary.
Children 9-12 in Handleman Hall.

For membership information, stop by
during office hours, or call us at 851-1100.

Temple Beth El

7400 Telegraph Road
Birmingham, Michigan 48010

THF DFTRNT

MMAM ava

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