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September 02, 1988 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

3141,

, U311130 31911111 39NR 3H1,, „ H111 30 . 11 T

XT Package incl. (full leather seats, spoilers, alum.
wheels and special tires) p.d.1., tinted glass, carpet
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List $16,292

$2300

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*Plus tax, title, destination. All rebates included where applicable. Rebates expire 9/28/88. Picture shown may
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On selected models.

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at 1-696

355-1000

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10 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1988

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H N BE ATABLE DE ALE ' '

OPINION

Transfer

0 31B V1V 3: N t 3.

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`THE UNBE ATA BLE DE ALE R " "THE UN BE A TABLE DE AL E R '

I

Continued from Page 7

give their allegiance to the
Palestinian home — a tiny
state devoted to enlarging
itself by supplanting the Jews
— next door. That fear, and
the fear of eventual Arab
secession in the Galilee,
Nazareth, Jerusalem, Haifa,
and the Negev is
well-founded.
Israel's Declaration of In-
dependence guarantees
Israeli Arabs "complete
equality of social and political
rights." The same document
also establishes Israel as a
Jewish state and guarantees
a Jewish right of return.
If Arabs have complete
equality, may then then,
when they become a majority,
take control from the Jews?
May they abrogate the right
of return and turn Israelinto
an Islamic state? Even to ask
these questions, as Meir
Kahane argues, belies the
promise of equality. Israel
will become an Arab-ruled
country over the dead bodies
of the Jews.
No Muslim or Christian
Arab, however moderate, can
find full political realization
in a Jewish state. The very
concept condemns him to a
life as a minority. Only to the
extent that an Arab is willing
to forego the pleasures of com-
plete political autonomy,
cultural and political in-
dependence and statehood
will he be happy living in
Israel.
In the United States, those
whose beliefs make them un-
willing or unable to accept
the fundamental laws of the
country may be barred from
entry, residence and citizen-
ship. Most countries have
similar mechanisms for
testing and ensuring loyalty.
Israel requires the allegiance
of Jews but expects and
receives nothing of the sort
from its Arab citizens.
The policy that grants
rights without respon-
sibilities is bankrupt. Israeli
officials realize that Arabs
are evading their taxes, yet
they make no special collec-
tion effort. Arab sqatters set-
tle on government land; the
government customarily, ex
post facto, grants them leases
— at terms more favorable
than those given to Jews. The
policy goal: to avoid anti-
Semitic confrontations and
unfavorable international
publicity.
Young Jewish men and
women must, at 17, begin na-
tional service — an obligation
that, for men, continues for
the next 28 years — from
which Israeli Arabs are ex-
cused. Outside the army,
almost nowhere in Israel can
a Jew set off on his own to
farm the land or build a home
without fear ofmarauding
Arabs.

In Judea, Samaria and
Gaza, Arabs receive funding
from oil-rich Arab govern-
ments, enabling them to pro-
sper during strikes and
upheavals while selling their
produce to foreigners who
boycott Jews. Arabs who live
in Egypt's one remaining
Gaza refugee camp cut
through the border fences to
get work in the same Israel
that they hope to destroy.
Individuals who hate Israel
— who won't or can't tolerate
Jewish national existence,
Israel's Jewish character or
fundamental laws — probably
don't belong there. "We must
deny the Arabs employment
in our own country," Herzl
wrote, "and help them find
employment elsewhere?' That
is one mechanism of a
transfer process. Taking sav-
ing measures, without help
for a world that seeks
something other than Israel's
dismemberment, won't be
easy. But the only other alter-
natives are unacceptable.
Historian Chaim Simons is
director of Israel's Nonsen. In-
stitute, which researches
transfer proposals. Recalling
Fridtjof Nansen, the
Norweigen delegate to the
League of Nations and chief
author of the Turkish-Greek
exchange, Simons said,
"Nansen's transfer of Turks
from Greece and Greeks from
Turkey solved what had been
described as hopeless pro-
blems of Turkish-Greek
rioting, religious and ethnic
oppression and reciprocal
massacres" that kept that
area in the news. More than
1,250,000 Christians and
355,000 Muslims were moved
from their separate ancient
enclaves — some at the point
of a gun — and happily
resettled.
"For peace's sake," Nansen
said, "remove the sources of
conflict. Transfer the popula-
tions, and cut the ulcer clear."
The proud Arab peoples
find Jewish statehood dif-
ficult enough to accept
anyway. For Jews to dominate
a restive Palestinian Muslim
minority is, from an Islamic
theological standpoint,
intolerable.
Israel's 40 years of more
than equalitarian generosity
to Israel's Arabs hardly has
accommodated them or
mollified any other Arabs.
With no shared allegiance,
two politically antithetical,
implacably opposed peoples
living together in oneland
must endanger each other.
Yet Palestinians can always
leave for any of 22 Arab coun-
tries, while Jews have only
Israel.
Moving, to a new country,
can be a positive experience;
those who can't believe in
Israel will thrive better

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