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August 26, 1988 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-08-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FAMILY/SCHOOL

LAURENCE A. MILLER,D.D.S., VICTOR L. GOLDSTEIN, D.D.S., GREGORY E. ELLIOTT, D.D.S.

are pleased to announce the opening of an
additional office for the practice of

Jewish Mothers

Continued from preceding page

FAMILY, COSMETIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE DENTISTRY

in the new

MERCY CARE MEDICAL BUILDING

indomitable black mother in
playwright Lorraine Hans-
berry's A Raisin in the Sun,
she was convinced that
"there's always something
left to love." It was not as if
her commitment means une-
quivocal approval of the
child's behavior. Indeed, she
could be harshly critical
when the occasion warranted.
But it did mean an abiding
concern for the child's welfare
— one that did not depend on
the child's temperament, at-
traciveness, or intelligence,
that did not wax or wane in
response to the child's day-to-
day behavior. This type of
mother did not raise her
children with reservations in
mind. Her love was
unconditional.
Such a zealously devoted
mother may actually have
achieved a far greater degree
of emotional maturity than
anyone gave her credit for. In
the view of psychoanalyst
Erik Erikson, the normally
maturing personality under-
goes a shift in adulthood to
what he called "generativity"
— a concern for establishing
and guiding the next genera-
tion and the achievement of
the satisfaction that comes
from nurturing children. Say

2900 Union Lake Road

(Corner of Commerce Rd./Across from K-Mart)

363-5600

DRS. MILLER, GOLDSTEIN AND ELLIOTT WILL CONTINUE TO MAINTAIN THEIR RESPECTIVE
OFFICES IN LIVONIA, WITH OVER 20 YEARS IN FAMILY DENTAL PRACTICE.

A new choice for the frail elderly

Independent Living with
Supportive Services

A new caring alternative for
the frail elderly is now
available at the exciting new
and elegant West Bloomfield
Nursing and Convalescent
Center.

• Deluxe semi-private or private
mini suites all with private

baths and a beautiful view of
a courtyard or wooded
grounds.

It's called Independent Living • Town Center Plaza with a
snack shop, beauty salon,
with Supportive Services. It's
flower
and gift shop and an
the choice between
old-fashioned ice cream parlor.
independent living and skilled
nursing care for the elderly
• Fine dining in an elegant
person who needs the
dining area with meals
essentials of living such as
prepared by an executive chef
housekeeping service, meals,
and served by a courteous,
laundry service and
friendly staff
medication, if needed.
Licensed nurses are on duty 24
hours a day.
• Exciting and varied activities,
planned and supervised, to
Residents in this program can
keep residents involved and
enjoy a relaxed, elegant
happy
atmosphere that includes:

Honor us with o visit. Weekdays 9 o.m-8 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday, noon-5 p.m.
An Affiliate of William Beaumont Hospital

Phone: 661-1600

It has more to do with attitude than with
whether or not you're there at 3 p.m.

Special to The Jewish News

rf)

13740
W. 9 Mile

S

Next to
Oak Park
Post Office

SPECIALIZING IN LASER THERAPY
IN ADDITION TO THE TREATMENT OF

Li Bunions
[11 Corns
11] Callouses

Ingrown Nails J Diabetic
Warts
Foot Care
U Pediatric Heel Pain
Foot Care
D Sports
Medicine

Medicare and most insurance plans
accepted as payment in full.

DANIEL S. LAZAR, D.P.M. 548-6633

4

64

FRIDAY; AUGUST 26; 1988-'

Julius Segal, Ph.D., a
contributing editor of Parents
Magazine, is a psychologist,
author and lecturer whose
latest book is Winning Life's
Toughest Battles (Ballantine).
This article first appears in
Parents Magazine.

Can Working Mothers
Be "Jewish Mothers"?

JULIUS SEGAL

FOOTSTEPS
PODIATRY
CLINIC

This mother was ready
always to make the child her
life's first priority. She ac-
cepted the reality that rear-
ing children takes time and
energy, pain and self-sacrifice
— that it demands the kind of
caring that often places the
child's future interests above
the mother's own present
ones. She reviewed her young
in the way sociologist Neil
Postman, author of The
Disappearance of Childhood
(Dell), described them — as
"the living messages we sent
to a time we will not sea" She
was a member of a generation
of parents who would die for
their children — guard them
and love them with a love
more fierce than that of life
itself.
Three cheers for the
"Jewish mother!" 0

• Pastoral and weekly Sabbath

services provided by Rabbi
Moshe Polter

Alail-SeflA, 6445 West Maple • West Bloomfield, Ml

Centec-

what you will, the so-called
Jewish mother fully matched
such a psychological portrait.

ome say that the old-
fashioned stereotype
of the doting mother is
gone now that so many
women are working outside
the home. But many think
otherwise. "It's a question of
attitude," says writer and
mother Francine Klagsbrun,
author of Married People:
Staying Together in The Age
of Divorce
(Bantam).
"Whether or not you happen
to have a career is hardly the
issue. I know plenty of women
who return home from work
each day and are altogether
involved in their children's
lives. Their kids are still the
most important thing in the
world to them."
By and large, the mothers I
interviewed reinforce Klags-
brun's view. Commitments to
kids and career, they say, are
not mutually exclusive.
What's important is making
the most of the time that
mother and child are able to
spend together. Even
fragmented periods of
togetherness, they are con-

vinced, can be used to rein-
force attachment.
Most of the working
mothers I talked to believe it
is critical to capitalize on
evening and weekends. It
helps, they say, to reserve a
generous portion of after-
work time just for un-
distracted interplay with the
kids. And on Satudays and
Sundays, it often makes more
sense to find occasions to be
together in settings that in-
vite interaction — the park,
the playground — than to sit
silently side by side in a
darkened movie house or at
still another McDonald's
birthday bash.
One mother described how
she adjusted the family sleep
schedule to help extend her
availability to the children.
She and her husband began
to go to bed earlier so that
they could get up early
enough to enjoy relaxed time
with the kids. Moreover, they
sometimes allowed their
youngsters to delay their bed-
time to prolong togetherness
after dinner.
A number of mothers also

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