100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 19, 1988 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-08-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I BUSINESS

Woolf Roofing & Maintenance Inc . -

A Third Generation Roofing Family in Detroit

Commercial &industrial Flat Roofs
• And High-Rises
Single-Ply and Built-up 'Systems

5-20 Year Warranties
FULLY INSURED

Member
National Roofing
Contractors

18161 W. 13 Mile Rd.
in Southfield

Free Inspections

Association

Israel To Install
Priority Mail Systems

646-2452


Now• •cosme tic
surgery
for
your
, •
entire body!

4

• Successful lasting body
contouring through professional
liposuction treatment.

Liposuction surgery is now recog-
nized as an effective means of
removing fat tissue from many
areas of the body.

a

,

COSMETIC SURGEONS OF
MICHIGAN, one of the area's
leading cosmetic surgery prac- .,..,
tices, is now offering lasting,
effective liposuction for patients
who qualify.
/
----\,,.
In addition, COSMETIC
SURGEONS OF MICHIGAN also
3 1i -
specialize in breast reconstruc-
\
tion, breast and body recontour-
ing and all forms of facial and nose
\\\\
\ ,
cosmetic surgery procedures.

j

Let the new you emerge! Call
COSMETIC SURGEONS OF
MICHIGAN today for more infor-
mation. Free literature and initial
consultation are available
for selected procedures. Call
(313) 645-0844.

COSMETIC SURGEONS OF MICHIGAN, P.C.

G. JAN BEEKHUIS, M.D., FA.C.S.

JEFFREY J. COLTON, M.D., FA.C.S.

.04I

.17

MICHAEL F. MILAN, M.D., FA.C.S.

All Board Certified Surgeons

‘Mitilm-/

30700 Telegraph Rd., Suite 4566, Birmingham, MI 48010 • 313/645-0844
One Mile South of Temple Beth El

62

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1988

)

Washington, D.C. — TCOM
Systems, Inc. of-Washington,
D.C., a national high-priority
mailing service, recently an-
nounced a number of
strategic plans including
agreement to establish its
first international partner-
ship with the Postal Authori-
ty of Israel.
Under the agreement,
TCOM will install its High
Priority Mail (HPM) system
in Israel by early 1989. The
move wil enable Israeli users
to receive overnight letter
delivery within that country
and one- and two-day service
between Israel and the
United States, says Robert
Ryan, President and CEO of
TCOM.
HPM mail originates in
computers and is transmitted,
distributed and tracked elec-
tronically by TCOM until it is
converted to paper and turn-
ed over to the Postal Service.
Conversion to hardcopy by
state-of-the-art laser printers
that can reproduce graphics
as well as text-takes place at
TCOM's regional operating
centers throughout the
United States.
Ryan said the company in-
tends to expand aggressively
in the United States and
overseas. The company also is
studying several product and
service extensions.
He said the company plans
to redirect some of its com-
munication and production
resources.
lb do so, the, company will
reduce the number of com-
pany owned and operated
regional centers and increase
the total number of centers
through cooperative
agreements with strategic
partners and service resellers.
"Our experience to date has
given us a much better pic-
ture of actual business-mail
sender/receiver patterns and
requirements, and we are con-
vinced that our strategic ad-
justments will give TCOM
greater exposure, market
share and increased produc-
tion capability," Ryan said.
He said the company wants
to provide a domestic network
of 83 operating centers
capable of providing over-
night HPM service to 9 perc-
net of the U.S. population. He
said cooperative arrange-
ments provided the best way
to achieve such expansion
rapidly.
During the transition to
cooperative operating centers,
the company will continue to
deliver HPM letters to most
metropolitan areas overnight
and to the rest of the United

States within two days.
The agreement with the
Israel Postal Authority calls
for TCOM to install the HPM
System in Tel Aviv, Jerusa-
lem and Haifa and to train
Israeli personnel in its
operation.
Initial service will be both
domestic, within Israel, and
two-way between the United
States and the Israeli hub
which will be in Tel Aviv.
Eventually, Israel, like the
United States, will be one
node in a global mail distribu-
tion and production network
serving most major countries
worldwide.
The Israel agreement also
marks another first for HPM:
use by individual mailers.
As operated in the U.S., the
system is used primarily by
volume mailers. The Israel
Postal Authority will,
however, install terminals in
post offices to allow in-
dividual customers to
originate high-speed letters
on the spot.
"The installation of a high
priority mail system indicates
the Postal Authority's deter-
mination to improve service
both domestically and inter-
nationally," Kaul said, "and
we believe that, once
established, it will also add
significantly to the Authori-
ty's revenues:'
The Authority is a wholly-
owned government corpora-
tion with the twin mandates
of maintaining quality mail
service and operating pro-
fitably. It also has respon-
sibility for much of the coun-
try's telecommunications
system.
"While we believe HPM's
first appeal will be to
business mailers, we are in-
trigued by the possibility it
will also be utilized by in-
dividual consumers who
want, in effect, to create their
own telegrams," Kaul said.
Mail delivery times in
Israel currently average 2.1
days, Kaul said, and HPM let-
ters will be delivered in half
that time.
He noted that 64 percent of
the 440 million First Class
letters mailed annually in
Israel are computer-
generated and would be readiT
ly convertible to HPM.
"We are convinced, however,
that the array of advantages
offered by HPM will attract
more businesses and organi-
zations to this type of mailing
and will thus generate new
volume and new revenue," he
added.

I

44

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan