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August 19, 1988 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-08-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRONTLINES

DETROIT'S
HIGHEST
RATES

12 MONTH CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT

8.100%
8.349%

Effective Annual Yield'

Minimum Deposit of $500

8.250%
8.509%

Effective Annual Yield`

Minimum Deposit of $75,000

*Compounded Quarterly
Rates subject to change without notice

This is a fixed rate account that is in-
sured to $100,000 by the Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Insurance Corporation
(FSLIC). Substantial Interest Penalty for
early withdrawal from certificate
accounts.

FIRST
SECURITY
SAVINGT I
BANK FSB

MAIN OFFICE

1760 Telegraph Rd.

PHONE 338.7700

(Just South of Orchard Lake)

!NAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

14

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1988

HOURS:
MON.-THURS.
9:30-4:30
FRI,
9:30-6:00

Interns Get
A Taste Of

I Communal Service

ROBIN FREEDMAN

Jewish News Intern

M

ost students pick a
practical college cur-
riculum — a smatter-
ing of English and economics,
some history and a little
business.
Fred Dobb is concentrating
on something most college
students have never
considered.
"I'm majoring in saving the
world," he said.
Dobb is the summer intern
at the Jewish Community
Council. He is one of nine col-
lege students participating in
Project JOIN, Jewish Occupa-
tional Interns, organized by
the Jewish Vocational Service
and funded by the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Detroit.
The nine-week program
provides students with the op-
portunity to learn about
Jewish communal service
work and to become active in
the Jewish community. Pro-
gram Coordinator Debra
Holzman-Silver matches each
student with an agency after
careful analysis of student in-
terests. Dobb got his first
choice.
Dobb was attracted to the
Council job because it com-
bines two of his favorite sub-
jects — politics and Judaism.
"The Council is exactly what
I wanted — a combination of
political and Jewish issues:'
A sophomore at Brandeis
University in Boston, Dobb is
assisting on a number of pro-
jects at the Council.
One of the programs on
which he is working is World
Food Day, slated for Oct. 13.
Dobb is asking restaurant
owners to donate 7 percent of
their gross income for the day
to the Southeast Michigan
Food Council.
Dobb also researches the
possibilities for media ex-
posure through which the
Council can educate the com-
munity on Soviet Jewry,
Israel, the Holocaust and
other Jewish issues. He also
does research to see where
the Council can get grants.
"The feeling of what a dif-
ference I can make is wonder-
ful," Dobb said.

1-6

c
c
92

Julie Breuer talks to a client at JVS.

Dobb's plans for the future
point toward the rabbinate —
a career for which he says he
is gaining experience this
summer.
"I know better how the
Jewish community works and
I'll be able to empathize with
the Jewish communal ser-
vants — the people I'll be
working with as a rabbi,"
Dobb said.
Like Dobb, 21-year-old Julie
Breuer plans to use the ex-
perience she is gaining as a
summer intern in her future
career.
Breuer is a workshop assis-
tant at Jewish Vocational Ser-
vice in Detroit. A graduate of
the University of Michigan,
Breuer uses her degree in
speech pathology to assist

developmentally disabled
adults training at JVS for
eventual work in the
community.
"I want to be able to com-
municate better with the
developmentally disabled
community. This experience
is helping me develop my
skills as a program coor-
dinator and is improving my
organizational skills," said
Breuer, who hopes to pursue
a career working with
children who have speech and
language problems.
For her work at JVS, Breuer
is running a voice modifica-
tion group and an asser-
tiveness training group for
women. She is responsible for
six clients and meets with a
counselor once a week to

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