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August 12, 1988 - Image 68

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-08-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I FOOD I

SUPERIOR
FISH CO.

Right in Your
Own Driveway!

),4 1 THE
TUNE

From the icy
cold waters ..

New Zealand

Fresh Norwegian

$3 99

$UL.



exp. 8/20/88

Certified by the National
Automotive Institute of Excellence

Alaskan

ORANGE
ROUGHY
FILLETS

SALMON
FILLETS

, -UP
I MAN

KING CRAB
LEGS

$9.99

lb.

Comes to your home or office
with the garage-on-wheels

Valet service that doesn't
cost one penny extra

• Expert diagnostic tune-up
• Electronic analyzer -
all engine systems
• Professionally trained
mechanics
• Perfect results assured

lb.

exp. 8/20/88

exp. 8/20/88

aro, is

0

I-



SUPERIOR FISH CO.

11 Mile

House of Quality

Serving Metropolitan Detroit for Over 40 Years

309 E. 11 Mile Rd., Royal Oak, MI • 541.4632

Parking in rear

Mon.-Wed. 8.5
Thurs. & Fri. 8.6
Saturday 8.1

Expanded Services
Call Sanford Rosenberg
for your car problems

= 398-36051

No one
mothers pasta
like Chef Boyardee

198 7 Ame rica n Ho me

Boyardee

CH EESE.

The way Chef Boyardee prepares cheese ravioli and
macaroni shells, you'd think he was a Jewish mother. He
uses only the finest ingredients: rich, ripe tomatoes,
aged cheese and enriched wheat flour. So his pasta is not
only delicious, it's also 95% fat-free, contains complex
carbohydrates and has no preservatives:
So for cheese ravioli and macaroni shells with all the
good things your mother would use, you can thank good-
ness for Chef Boyardee.

c

Thank Goodness for Chef Boyardee

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

BAGEL DELI P

UCE CO.

6088 W. MAPLE AT FARMINGTON RD. • W. Bloomfield • 851-9666

OPEN MON. THRU SAT. 9 TO 6

SUNDAY 8 TO 3

THE PLACE FOR SMOKED FISH

KOSHER ©

THE FINEST SMOKED FISH & DELI TRAYS
HANDOUT NOVA LOX

SUMMER SPECIAL AUG. 12-AUG. 18

SMOKED

KIPPERED
SALAD

$6.99

a
• u_ p iz i n.- Av tdintrutolagg

SMOKED

SABLE
SALAD

$6.99

SMOKED

WHITEFISH

$6.99

Bubbles Are Chic, Just
Don't Call It Seltzer

GLORIA KAUFER GREENE

Special to The Jewish News

W

hat used to be
known as "two
cents plain" ain't so
plain anymore. Seltzer has
taken on a new taste, a new
name and a new life with the
addition of various essences
that add flavor and aroma.
Flavored sparkling water —
seltzer's new name — has
become the in drink of the
health-and-diet concious '80s,
if sales and newly created
hybrids are any indication.
Already accounting for more
than half of all sparkling
water sales, it seems that the
popularity of these new
flavored Tizzies has yet to
peak.
According to Glen Wasser,
an appropriately named con-
sultant to the bottled water
industry, flavored sparkling
water sales are expected to
rise 70 percent by 1990.
What has been gobbled up,
however, is seltzer's good
name. Mention seltzer to
anyone in the bottling in-
dustry and Zeltzer Seltzer,
New York Seltzer, San Fran-
cisco Seltzer and other drinks
containing sugar, corn syrup
or other sweeteners come to
mind. While they may be col-
orless and even "all natural,"
they are far from calorie-free.
According to the United
States Department of Agri-
culture, these ersatz seltzers
are really "soda!'
What was once seltzer now
falls under the industry um-
brella of "sparkling water"
and includes flavored and
unflavored calorie-free car-
bonated waters like those pro-
duced by Perrier and Vintage.
For a long time Americans
turned their noses up at this
fizzy, refreshing drink, but no
more. According to Wasser,
Americans spent three-
quarters of a billion dollars
last year on these bubbling
thirst quenchers. And in the
past decade, sparkling water
has developed into an elite
recreational beverage, a
water "soft drink" if you will.
Concern about the quality
of the local water supply is
another reason people are
turning to these bottled
waters, according to William
Deal, executive vice president
of the International Bottled
Water Association.
Whatever the reasons,
sparkling water sales really
took off when astute market-
ing by the French bottler Per-
rier made it acceptable —
even chic — to sip a glass of

expensive, slightly bitter, ef-
fervescent water instead of an
alcoholic cocktail.
In fact, Wasser said increas-
ed awareness of the drunk
driving problem has helped
raise sparkling water from its
lowly status as a low-cost soda
fountain spritzer to its respec-
table place in top-notch bars.
Perrier's popularity quickly
led to the nationwide
distribution of a number of
upscale imports as well as
increased sales of other
brands. And considering that
a slice of lemon or lime is so
frequently added to embellish
the flavor of plain sparkling
water "mocktails," it was a
logical step for bottlers to
start adding fruit flavors.
According to the Boston
Globe, the first flavored
seltzer in the United States
was produced seven years ago
by the Polar Corporation. The
Massachusetts bottler first
added the obvious lemon and
lime, but now offers five
flavors, including peach and
cranberry.
In transforming plain
seltzer into sparkling water,
bottlers add an average of two
pounds of concentrated
natural fruit essences to
every 1,000 pounds of purified
water. They then bubble car-
bon dioxide gas through the
mixture.
While a few bottlers make
their own natural extracts,
the technique is so com-
plicated that Polar and most
others prefer to have flavor
houses develop custom
blends. And some bottlers, ac-
cording to Wasser, are begin-
ning to use artificial flavors
as well in their sparkling
waters.
But flavoring sparkling
water can be a tricky busi-
ness. Because the flavor of the
carbonation tends to be over-
powering without a
sweetener to mask it, bottlers
add a large dose of "bouquet,"
the fruit's distinctive aroma.
In fact, the scent probably
contributes as much if not
more to the fruit sensation as
the actual taste on the
tongue.
Fruit essences are now
available in natural sparkl-
ing water, such as Perrier,
which comes from an aquifer,
as well as manufactured
sparkling water. Flavors and
strengths differ from brand to
brand.
Owned by the Perrier
Group and marketed by Great
Waters of France, Inc., Poland
Springs and Perrier are both

Continued on Page 70

C/<

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