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July 22, 1988 - Image 68

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I PEOPLE I

YOU ALONE CAN DO IT,
BUT YOU CAN'T DO IT ALONE . • •

• DO YOU "LIVE" TO EAT?
• DO YOU HAVE TROUBLE SAYING NO?
• TOO MUCH TO DO, TOO LITTLE TIME?

CALL

647-5540

New Man At The Times
Jerusalem Bureau

• WEIGHT CONTROL
• INDIVIDUAL
COUNSELING

• STRESS MANAGEMENT
• ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING

NATE GELLER

Special to the Jewish News

HEALTHY OPTIONS, INC.
BIRMINGHAM

DEA FARRAH
MSW, ACSW, CSW

I

DESSERT PANCAKES
WITH R
ASPBERRY S ALICE
Makes 6 Servings

1 package FLEISCHMANN'S* Active
Dry Yeast
,
cup warm water
(1057-115°F)
1 cup warm skim milk
1/ 4 cup
FLEISCHMANN'S
Unsalted Margarine Sweet

V4

2 tablespoons sugar
1 cup all-purpose
flour
Y4 cup
EGG BEATERS
Free 99% Real Egg Cholesterol-
Product
Raspberry
Sauce, recipe below

Dissolve yeast in warm water;
EGG BEATERS until
stir in milk
margarine and
until doubled in bulk, mixture
about is smooth. Cover;
let rise in sugar Mix in flour and
30 minutes.
warm draft free place
Stir
batter
down.
Pour
batter
by
V4 ghtly
been heated
cupfuls onto li
to 350°F. Cook
brown on both
until bubbles
greased griddle
that has
sides. To serve
Sauce
appear on surface of pancakes; turn to
roll into fingers
and
top
with
warm
Raspberry
Raspberry Sauce:
syrup from berries Thaw 1 (10-ounce) package frozen
1
raspberries; place
into 2 saucepan
with 2 Bring
tablespoons water,
stick cinnamon
and
whole cloves.
IA cup
simmer
10
minutes. Remove cinnamon mixture to a 2 tablespoons sugar
boil; reduce heat and
arrowroot and 2 tablespoons water; add to and
sauce
cloves. Combine 1 teaspoon
mixture boils and thickens. Stir in raspberries.
in
pan. Cook and stir
until

.i revo `
soty‘0,-?

eito

15e

Try this recipe for a luscious dessert. It's made with
Fleischmann's® Margarine and Fleischrnann's Egg
Beaters so it nc onfy tastes great, it's good for you.
Fleischmann's WIga rine is made from 100% corn
oil, has °,;) oil 'Oral and is low in saturated fat.
Li'll..agree: There's never been a

MANUFACTURER COUPON I EXPIRES JUNE 30, 1989

F.0.0%,07

KMaciruix8
FTelschmann8

can.

SAVE 15c

When you buy any package of
Fleischmann's Margarine

,

belt

me

great tilsta of Fleischmann's_

FLEISCHIVIANN'S GIVES EVERY MEAL
A HOLIDAY FLAVOR.

68

Mntlysrlso

FRIDAY, JULY 22, 1988

I

RETAILER: One coupon per purchase of prod-
uct indicated. Any other use constitutes fraud
Consumer to pay sales tax Void if copied.
transferred, prohibited, used or restricted
Good only in USA .AP as and F.P 0.s. We
will reimburse you for the lace value plus 8C
handling, provided you and the consumer
have complied with the otter terms Cash value
11205. NABISCO BRANDS. INC. DEPT. 5921
L PASO. TEXAS 79966,

L

838259

5

29000

Li

am a clean slate when it
comes to Israel," said Joel
Brinkley, recently ap-
pointed chief of the New York
Times' Jerusalem bureau.
"That may be one of the
reasons I was sent here."
Brinkley has been in Israel
since late April. Before his
assignment, he had never
been in the Jewish state. The
closest he came was during a
short stint in Lebanon in
1983.
On almost a daily basis
from December through
April, Israel fought a media
blitz on the pages of most U.S.
newspapers, including the
Times. Headlines were sensa-
tionalized; provocation by
Palestinians against Israeli
soldiers was generally ig-
nored; and, largely, the Gaza
and West Bank uprisings
were written about in a
historical vacuum that
overlooked the historical
antecedents of the issue.
But now, a noticeable shift
may be taking place in the
Times' coverage from
Jerusalem, a shift that owes,
perhaps, as much to Brink-
ley's arrival on the scene as to
a tapering in the violence in
the disputed territories.
Brinkley, who refused to
discuss the Times' coverage of
the intifida before his arrival
in Israel, said that
"rediscovering Israel [by
Times' readers] is made
easier because I came when
there was a lower level of
violence. This offers me time
to cover things besides the in-
tifida My greatest curiosity is
about what is happening in-
side Israel proper. Earlier,
there was not much time to
cover that side."
In a May 2 story on the
Times' front page, for exam-
ple, Brinkley reported that
contrary to daily news reports
of unrest in Israel, tourists
visiting the country do not ex-
perience any unusual situa-
tions and that everyday life
continues in a remarkably
calm fashion. The article also
mentioned that 80 to 90 per-
cent of the approximately
100,000 Palestinians on the
West Bank and Gaza who are
employed inside Israel have
been at work — and on time
— every day.
Brinkley may also have
been the first journalist to
report that Christian fun-
damentalists and Europeans
were pouring into the coun-
try, while the number of

Jewish tourists from the U.S.
has declined precipitously.
More recently, Brinkley
reported on a Soviet Jewish
family which had resettled in
Israel despite warnings from
friends about the violence
there. His article brought in-
to focus Israeli attitudes
about Soviet Jewish
emigration.
For the last five years,
Brinkley has been based in
the Times' Washington
bureau. He was most recent-
ly the paper's White House
correspondent and editor of
its coverage of the Iran-
Contra hearings.
Brinkley, the 35-year-old
son of TV newsman, David
Brinkley, received the 1980
Pulitzer Prize for interna-
tional reporting for his
coverage of the Cambodian
refugee situation. He has also
been a reporter and editor
with the Louisville Courier
Journal, an Associated Press
reporter in Charlotte, N,.C.,
and a reporter with the Rich-
mond, Va., News-Leader.
Before leaving Washington,
Brinkley studied conversa-
tional Hebrew. His studies,
which have continued in
Israel, have progressed to the
point where he can hold sim-
ple conversations. He does not
plan to study Arabic, but his
staff, which speaks both
Hebrew and Arabic, provides
daily translations of local
press coverage.
Brinkley succeeds the
Times' veteran chief of its
Jerusalem bureau, Thomas
Friedman, who is on a leave-
of-absence from the paper
writing a book about the Mid-
dle East. Upon his return to
the paper in about a year,
Friedman will be stationed in
Washington.

"'"'I NEWS

Knesset
Bars Kahane

Jerusalem (JTA) — The
Knesset voted unanimously
Tuesday to suspend Rabbi
Meir Kahane for threatening
an Arab Knesset member at
a session several months ago.
Kahane, leader of the ex-
tremist Kach party, will be
barred from attending five
consecutive plenary sessions.
He also was reprimanded for
using offensive language.
Kahane, Kach's only
Knesset member, swore at
Mohammed Miari of the Pro-
gressive List for Peace and
waved a hangman's noose at
him in the Knesset chamber.

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