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July 15, 1988 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I CLOSE-UP I

CUSTOM FLORAL DESIGNS
By Jackie

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Continued from preceding page

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+ American Red Cross



\■ 1 ESA ARTS

1988 BASEBALL CARDS

TOPPS Set of 792 $22
FLEER Set of 660 $26
DONRUSS Set of 66026
SCORE Set of 660 $26
SPECIAL One of each set$90

1987 TOPPS ROOKIES

AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

• Paintings
• Kachinas

• Pottery
• Sculpture

Gallery Hours:
Tues.-Fri. 10.4 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
or by appointment

• Jewelry
• Folk Art

w

..1•LE RD

MESA ARTS

32800 Franklin Rd., Franklin, MI (313) 851.9949

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THE

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TOPPS

1986
1987
1988

each

Checks, money orders, VISA, MC accepted - per-
sonal checks must clear; 5% charge for VISA, MC.
Postage is $2.50. C.O.D. available - $2.50 extra.
Mich. residents add 4% sales tax.

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135 E. Maple, Corner of Woodward
433-3800

GET REMITS •

Call The Jewish News

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each per 10

BOBBY BONILLA
JOSE CANSECO
WALLY JOYNER
MARK McGWIRE
GREG SWINDELL

The Clubs

Nevertheless, members
report, the Jewish clubs have
changed somewhat over the
years. The changes are not
universally welcomed, says
one Franklin Hills member,
but reflect those in society at
large.
There is a "greater infor-
mality," particularly in dress.
Dress codes still exist, but are
less rigid. "People are realiz-
ing," says one long-time
member of Knollwood, "that
you are not your clothes and
that, when you've finished
work, you want to relax, not
compete."
Another obvious develop-
ment over the years is that
the clubs have become more
family-oriented. Although
primary membership re-
mains a male prerogative,
men's clubs have become
family clubs. Expanded social
activities range from formal
parties and theme nights to
bingo, and they cater to fami-
ly members of all ages. Pools,
tennis courts and saunas sup-
plement the golf courses.
Aquatic and aerobic classes
are provided in response to
current interest in spa-style
work-outs.
At a time when more
Americans are eating out
than ever before, the clubs'
dining facilities, always
highly rated, are even more
popular. "In fact," says a
Knollwood member, "there's
much more utilization of all
the facilities, including the
golf course, than there was
years ago. I don't think I've
ever seen them in so much
use as they were last year."
Passion for golf remains a
major motive for membership,
says Leonard Simons, who
combined his own loves of golf
and history in producing a
history of Franklin Hills to
mark the club's 60th anniver-
sary last year. Golf, not other
activities, he points out, was
the raison d'etre of Redford,
which was "a club within a
club" as the golfing facility of
the Phoenix Club, the Jewish
social club founded in 1872 in
Detroit. The two clubs had a
common membership and ad-
ministration until they
separated in 1920.
When the clubhouse
became too small for extend-
ed social activities and a
rapidly-expanding Detroit
threatened to encroach on the
Redford course, the club mov-
ed to Franklin and changed
its name to Franklin Hills.
The new and highly-
acclaimed course, designed by
Donald Ross, and Albert
Kahn clubhouse were opened
in 1927.
Many of Franklin Hills'
original members lived in
Palmer Woods, attended Tern-

ple Beth El and belonged to
the German-Jewish families
often regarded at the time as
the "elite' of Detroit's Jewish
community.
Has access to pretigious ci-
ty clubs, with broader-based
memberships, affected the de-
mand for country club
membership?
Club officials decline to
comment on club affairs. In-
dividual members, however,
say "No!' "When you comapre
city and country clubs, you're
talking apples and oranges,"
says one. "They have distinct-
ly different purposes."

Although primary
membership
remains a male
prerogative, men's
clubs have become
family culbs.

If there is an element of
competition, then country
clubs are likely to do better,
he believes, because of their
location near the new subur-
ban business centers. While
city clubs are seeking
members, country club
memberships are reportedly
running at or near
maximum.
Most club members join
both. Fees for business/city
clubs ($1,500 initiation and
$115 per month at the
Deteroit Athletic Club last
year) are often paid by
employers and are generally
much lower than country
clubs. As reported in 1987, in-
itiation fees were $25,000 at
Tam O'Shanter; $30,000 at
Knollwood and $31,250 at
Franklin Hills (the most ex-
pensive in the state). Basic
annual dues were $3,600;
$4,200 and $3,900
respectively.
These clubs also require, as
a condition of membership,
regular charitable contribu-
tions, usually to the Allied
Jewish Campaign, though in
some instances non-Jewish
charities are acceptable
alternatives.
Says one member, "If you
can afford to belong to a coun-
try club, you can afford to put
something back into society."
The basic outlay, added to
such expenses as greens fees
and minimum monthly din-
ing room charges, make
membership an expensive
business and rising costs of
maintenance and services
constitute a perennial ad-
ministrative headache. Full-
capacity membership alone
does not keep clubs solvent,
particularly those with a low
turnover in membership and
a large proportion of older
members, who often pay

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