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July 08, 1988 - Image 76

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOOKING BACK

• QUIHTESSENCE • LUC BEHOIT • QU ► PITESSEIKE • TWO SISTERS • QUIHTESSEtICE •

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• JUDITh JACK • QUINTESSENCE • DAVID DART • QUINTESSENCE • CELIA SE5IRI •

MEYERS • QUINTESSENCE •

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A • QUINTESSENCE

QUINTESSENCE • LEON MAX • QL

5EPICE • REVIVALS •

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THE

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76

FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1988

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Half A Century

Continued from preceding page
Bar-Ilan University and
Men's ORT.
Bernard follows a long line
of former YAD presidents,
beginning with Maurice
Glasier, who have since gone
on to distinguish themselves
in various fields. These in-
clude, in chronological order:
Jacob Keidan, • David
Goldman, Sol Schwartz, Dr.
Samuel Krohn, Lawrence
Fleischman, Albert Colman,
Milton Lucow, Leo Majzels,
Avern Cohn, Norman Katz,
Arthur Rubiner, William
Wetsman, Alan Luckoff,
Daniel Honigman, Fred
Keidan, Louis Stern, Joel
Tauber, Barry Yaker, Ivan
Boesky, Maida Portnoy.
Recent presidents include:
Michael Hermanoff, Allan
Nachman, Stanley Frankel,
Michael Maddin, Robert
Slatkin, Robert Rubin, Bur-
ton Farbman, - Edward
Lumberg, Richard Maddin,
Neil Satovsky, Jeffrey Bonin,
Jonathan Jaffa, Kenneth
Safran, Benjamin Rosenthal,
James Deutchman, James
Safran, Julie Borim, Jeffrey
Howard, David Liner, Betsy
Heuer and Norman Beitner.
In its early years, YAD had
a smaller focus than it does
today. The only programming
involved the Allied Jewish
Campaign solicitations, and
members sat on boards of
Federation agencies. lbday,
the scope of YAD has widen-
ed to include educational op-
portunities, social events,
political and community
awareness projects, leader-
ship development and mis-
sions to Israel.
Albert Colman, president
from 1949 to 1950, recalled
that the establishment of the
State of Israel was the major
focal point of the group dur-
ing his tenure. "There was a
lot of enthusiasm engendered
by the State of Israel," at-
torney Colman said. "It was
a momentous occasion for
Jews all around the world to
close - ranks." Since his
presidency, Colman said he
has seen the division grow
enormously, especially in its
Allied Jewish Campaign
drive. "The scope of it, in
terms of sheer money raised
is dramatic . . . It is a much
broader based group."
World War II slowed YAD
activities for a while, but by
the end of the war the group
was reactivated with a Sup-
plies for Overseas Survivors
project.
The 1950s brought a name
change — from the Junior
Section of the Detroit Service
Group to the Junior Division
— and incorporation into the
Federation. AJCampaigning
was done face to face and stay-
at-home days were scheduled
so that members could be met

.

by a solicitor. Attorney Nor-
man Katz, who directed the
division from 1953 to 1954,
said his mission was to em-
phasize the "Israeli aspect" of
the group, but equally impor-
tant was the educational pro-
gramming, fund raising and
personal involvement. "We
wanted the involvement of
numbers, " Katz explained.
"We wanted to get them
(members) involved in the
community. We had a real
drive to get people involved.
We wanted their spirit."

"They could
contribute as a
solicitor and
participate in
concerns."

That spirit continued into
the '60s, and so did Junior
Division involvement in
Jewish communal service.
The division added a six-week
tutorial program for disad-
vantaged children to its list of
'activities. Allan Nachman,
senior real estate partner in
a law firm who presided over
the division in 1968-1969,
recalls the Burnie Bird pro-
ject the group undertook.
Members of the division went
to schools to teach children
about fire prevention. But,
the group made other strides
as well.
According to Nachman, the
group opened its board
meetings to non-members
and a social aspect was add-
ed. When the group made a
special appeal to Jewish
singles, Nachman said the
numbers "started to grow."
"One of the purposes (of
Junior Division) is to meet
other Jewish people,"
Nachman said. He called the
special effort to attract
singles a "positive step which
helped sustain the thrust of
the division."
Lillian Bernstein, division
director from 1966 to 1981,
said the 1960s were signifi-
cant to the division in terms
of raising the social con-
sciousness of its members.
"There were changes taking
place, in Israel, the United
States, including Vietnam,"
she said. "What was taking
place locally and overseas was
affecting their lives and they
began to respond to the needs
of the Jewish people . . . Peo-
ple whose families were not
involved in the organized
Jewish community became
active in the division. They
cauld contribute as a solicitor
and participate in communi-
ty concerns."
There was another compo-
nent that made the division
special, she said. It had wide
appeal. "There's a place for
everyone, regardless of

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