100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 24, 1988 - Image 135

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Hava Nedaber Ivrit: How Israel Treats Its Elderly

Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will present a Hebrew
lesson entitled, "Hava Nedaber
Ivrit!" (Let's Speak Hebrew), whose
aim is to encourage further study of
Hebrew. The lesson will include a
brief story utilizing the Hebrew
words to be studied, a vocabulary
list with English translations and a
family activity which involves using
the new words. The lessons will be
prepared by Nira Lev, associate
professor of Hebrew language and
literature at the Midrasha College of
Jewish Studies. Mrs. Lev also
teaches Hebrew language and
literature at the Community Jewish
High School at the United Hebrew
Schools.
Following is this month's
lesson:
Saba and Savta are meeleem
that arouse warm, pleasant regashot
in our lev. The words zaken, z'kena,
z'keneem, on the other hand,
arouse different regashot. In our
masoret, however, as well as in
other tkoo-fot in history, it was
considered a great kavod to be a
zaken and the z'keneem of the
keheela had a very high status.
In the Tanach and in the
m'korot, we find many psookeem
instructing us to treat the z'keheem
with kavod, ahava and consideration
and to offer them ezra and support
whenever necessary.
The z'keneem used to be the
moreem and manheegeem of the
keheela and their opinions and
advice were sought and respected.
At the same time, it was understood
and acknowledged that the

z'keneem were chalasheem and in
need of the ezra, and we are
constantly reminded of our
obligations: "Vehadarta Pnai
Zaken," "Al Taschleechaynee le'et
zikna." These, like other psookeem
from the Tanach, should be our
guide in our yachas to z'keneem. In
Israel, every yeled and yalda, every
talmeed and talmeeda are being
taught these and other psokeem
relating to kavod to the z'keneem.
When yeladeem or young
people see a zaken or a z'kena
getting on the autoboos, they know
they should give up their makom on
the autoboos and offer it to the
zaken or z'kena. When one sees a
zaken or z'kena trying to cross the
k'veesh, one should offer ezra; and
needless to say, one should give
the utmost care, ahava and m'seroot
to one's own kroveem z'keneem.
Every zaken and zkena should get
the same yachas: Ahava, kavod and
m'seeroot as you would like to get
when you become a zaken yourself.

Vocabulary

saba
savta
meleem
meela
regashot
regesh
lev
zaken
z'kena
z'keneem
masoret
tkoo-fot
tkoo-fa

talmeed
talmeeda
autoboos
makom
k'veesh
m'seeroot
kroveem
karov

a student (masculine)
a student (feminine)
a bus
'place, seat
road (where the cars go)
devotion, dedication
relatives
a relative

Family Activity

Talk to the elderly people in
your family, synagogue,
neighborhood and try to get to know
them better. Find out what their
needs are and see what you can do
to help.
Organize a group of your
friends to visit some lonely elderly
people in a nursing home near you.
Make a list of elderly people you
know and send them a card on a
holiday or their birthday or just to
say "shalom."
Inquire about special services
offered to the elderly in your
community. Find out if you or your
friends can sometimes participate
during your summer vacations.

grandfather
grandmother
words
a word
feelings
a feeling
heart
an old man (masculine)
an old woman (feminine)
old people (plural)
tradition
periods of time
a period of time

Befriend A Senior

When you become friends with
a senior adult, you will find it easy
to treat them just as you would any
of your other friends once you get
to know them. As you are aware of
your friends' likes and dislikes, so
will you soon begin to know all
about those of your new friend's
and together you can do many
things.
Among them, you can go
shopping, go to the movies, go out
to lunch or for an afternoon snack,
go to the library, accompany your
new friend to a doctor's
appointment so that you can keep
each other company in the waiting
room, go for a walk, play a game of
gin rummy or Scrabble, bake
cookies, share a special television
program, go to the zoo (early in the
morning on a not very hot day), go
to the art institute, go to a play at
the Jewish Community Center, go to
Shabbat services at your temple or
synagogue, prepare a special lunch,

honor, respect
kavod
community
keheela
the Jewish Bible (an
The Tanach
acronym for Torah, N've-eem,
Ktoovem)
sources
m'korot
source
makor
verses
psookeem
pasook
a verse
love
ahava
help
ezra
moreem
teachers
moreh
teacher (masculine)
leaders
manheegeem
a leader
manheeg
week (plural)
chalasheem
week (singular)
chalash
"Vehadarta p'nai Zaken" a quotation
from the Bible (Leviticus 19, 32)
meaning: Thou shalt give respect to
the elderly.
"Al Tasch-lee-chay-nee le'et
zeeknah" a quotation from the Book
of Psalms (71, 9) meaning: Don't
discard me (don't forsake me) when
I get old (when I reach old age).
relation, attitude
yachas
a boy
yeled
a girl
yalda

VIDEO CASSETTES

dinner or afternoon snack together
at their home or yours.
You can invite them to one of
your Little League games, piano or
dance recitals; play a game called
"Then and Now," talking about
things that both of you have done
such as, going to school, becoming
bar/bat mitzvah, going on vacations,
Israel, holiday celebrations, family.
Try to find out how it was different
when your senior adult friend was
your age.
Other activities include: call
once a day just to say hello, plant a
garden or an indoor sweet potato
plant, do a jigsaw puzzle, read the
newspapers and discuss several
articles, send funny cards in the
mail, learn how to make special
holiday foods from special family
recipes, ask your friend what they
like to do and join them in doing it!

Contributed by Patricia A. Milner,
assistant administrator, Jewish Federation
Apartments.

Sing-Along Israel (concert) and Sephardic melodies
(concert), available at Spitzer's.

BOOKS

"Times of Challenge," Rabbi Nosson Scherman and
Rabbi Meir Zlotowitz; "A Time to Live," Chana Staysky
Rubin, both at Borenstein's and Spitzer's. "Fear No Evil,"
Natan Sharansky; "Lillith's Cave," Howard Schwartz;
"Gang of Four," Yaacov Peterseil; "The Missing Crown,"
Galila Ben-Uri; "My Uncle the Netziv," Rabbi Naftali
Berlin; and "Book of Jeremiah," translated by Rav Breur,
all at Spitzer's. "Arrogant Ari Learns a Lesson," Goldie
Golding; Reb Yitzchak's Jewel, by Rabbi Nosson
Scherman; "Soon I'll Be ... ," Jacqueline Pliskin; "And
Hannah Wept," Michael Gold; " A Nightmare in History,"
Miriam Chaikin;" Bar/Bat Mitzvah and Beyond," Rabbi
Nachman Cohen; "From Head to Toe," Yaffa Ganz; " A
Child's Bible: Lessons from the Torah," Seymour Rossel;
"Chagall Illustrated Haggadah"; "Growth Through Torah,"
Zelig Pliskin, all at Borenstein's.

AUDIO CASSETTES

The Magic Yarmulka, both at Borenstein's and
Spitzer's. Torah Time Machine, Aaron Applebaum; A
Wedding Celebration, Neginah Orchestra; A Time for
Music, Mordechai Ben David; The Return of the London
School of Jewish Song; and the cast of Les Miserables (in
Hebrew), all at Spitzer's.

Spitzer's is located at 21770 W. 11 Mile, Southfield.
Borenstein's is located at 25242 Greenfield, Oak Park.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS L-7

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan