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June 17, 1988 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-06-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

R=Nr71

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14

FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1988

Brzezinski Sees U.S Pressure
Breaking Middle East Stalemate

ROBYN KLEEREKOPER

Special to The Jewish News

E

xhorting America and
the next administra-
tion to take a more
positive mediatory role in the
Middle East, Zbigniew
Brzezkinski warned the 58th
anniversary dinner of the
Council of Orthodox Rabbis
last week that the situation is
a stalemate.
"I see it as serious, and pro-
tracted and increasingly
ominous;' said the former na-
tional security adviser to
President Jimmy Carter.
"The Arabs are leaderless
and visionless about strategic
risks, whether for war or
peace. They seem to have no
conception of how to deal with
the problem. What was strik-
ing about the late Anwar
Sadat was he had vision."
"The Arab people have
neither galvanized world opi-
nion on its side, nor been
systematic and forceful in the
pursuit of Arab objectives.
And this condition of a vi-
sionless and leaderless Arab
side unfortunately persists."
The Israelis have similar
problems. They are "gridlock-
ed politically and in terms of
their concepts of the future as
well."
Brzezinski called for
American mediation to
change the situation, and he
forsees American leverage
against both Israel and the
Arabs.
"It means having to run the
risk of facing political
criticism at home, even run-
ning the risk of generating
some passing criticism from
the. Jewish community."
The West Bank and Gaza
occupation is "very difficult,"
Brzezinski said, calling for a
compromise that will permit
coexistence between the
Israelis and the Palestinians
"the only possible solution
. . . How long can this condi-
tion endure without the con-
flict eventually erupting?"
Brzezinski sees no short-
term answers, and feels
Secretary of State George
Shultz can achieve little at
this late stage in the Reagan
Administration. The onus, he
maintained, will be on the
next American President.
It would be easy and
understandable for an
American President to not
enter the negotiations, but
this decision, he said, would
be bad for the United States
and for Israel.

Brzezinski also focused on
several foreign policy problem
areas. "So far, after three
years of Gorbachev," in the
Soviet Union, "we've had a
great deal of glasnost, which
means overtness, openness,
open discussion, particularly
in the press and to a lesser ex-
tent in Leningrad and else-
where, but very little tangible
benefit to the masses .. .
"My own bottom line is that
perestroika in the Soviet
Union will not succeed, that

Zbigniew Brzezinski

Gorbachev will not imple-
ment a successful perestroika
which transforms the Soviet
Union into a modernizing,
creative, dynamic, self-
energizing system such as ex-
ists for example in Japan,
which is his objective. Much
more likely is a protracted
phase of internal turmoil, of
uncertainty, of moving for-
ward and backward, of
disputes, and eventually of
dilution of support and
momentum for perestroika.

But in the meantime, in
terms of American-Soviet
relations, it appears to me,
likely there will be a period of
some accomodation."
This breathing spell would
support the possibility of
some concessions with the
United States in the area of
arms control, and concessions
on some regional issues such
as Afghanistan, and grudg-
ingly in terms of human
rights, claims Brzezinski. But
he warns America not to
overlook the fundamental
issues that can't be resolved,
stressing the fact that while
the U.S. spends about 6.5 per-
cent of its gross national pro-
duct on defense spending, the
Soviet Union commits about
20 percent.
Several areas of unrest in
South America have not been
alleviated by U.S. interven-
tion, and in some cases the
matters have worsened, says
Brzezinski, who sees a pro-
gressive degenerating of the
situation in El Salvador, in
Honduras, Guatemala and
Panama. These will be con-
founded further by the
Soviets, and will adversely
affect American-Soviet
relations.
The honoree at the Council
of Orthodox Rabbis' dinner
was the organization's presi-
dent Rabbi Leizer Levin.
The rabbi, who has served
the Detroit community for 50
years, was honored with a pla-
que and a trip to Israel for
himself and his family. He
was publicly lauded by
Federal Judge Avern Cohn
and Rabbi Levin's son-in-law,
Rabbi Berel Wein of Monsey,
N.Y.

Retired Generals Urge
Territorial Withdrawal

DAVID HOLZEL

Staff Writer

I

srael should seek a peace
treaty with the Arabs
that would include a
demilitarized West Bank and
Gaza under Arab control and
an Israeli security presence
on the Jordan River.
This is the essence of the
message four retired Israeli
generals brought to
American Jewish audiences
Tuesday in a closed-circuit
telecast over the Council of
Jewish Federations satellite
network.
The four — Aharon Yariv,

Ephraim Sneh, Ori Orr and
Yoram Agmon — are
members of a newly formed
organization called the Coun-
cil for Peace and Security. Its
aim is to convince an Israeli
public looking at elections in
November that "there is no
contradiction between peace
and security," in the words of
Yariv, a former member of
Knesset now on the staff of
the Jaffe Center for Strategic
Studies.
Twenty Jewish com-
munities, including Detroit,
were linked with the telecast
that originated in New York
City. The generals' visit to

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