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June 10, 1988 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-06-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LIGHTSIDE

ant ashion

"Special Occasions
Require Special Dresses"

EVENING WEAR
SPORTS WEAR
ACCESSORIES

ALWAYS 20% OFF

Knock On Wood

Continued from preceding page

10-7 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
Sun. 12-5

737-4483

29345 14 Mile, Corner of Middlebelt, Broadway Plaza, Farmington Hills

FASHION SPECIALTIES

30919 Orchard Lake Rd.
At Orchard Place Center

626 1770

-

Fantastic Sale!
Moving To La Mirage Mall

Must Sell
Entire Stock

1 /2

OFF

All Summer
Fashions

Come See! —
Come Save!

Open Mon.-Sat. 10-6, Thurs. Till 9, SUNDAY 12-5

Two Great Names 0 Samsonite & Marmel

But One Great Sale

FITS LIKE A GLOVE,

SAVE 30% ON ALL SAMSONITE PATIO FURNITURE

Suggested list for 48" table and four Action Dining Chairs $1204.00.

Now only $842.00

CHAISE
SIDE TABLE
Reg1294-0D_ $203.70 Reg.-$442:00_$99.40

55" TABLE
Rety-$362:00_$267.00

-

DINING CHAIR
ACTION LOUNGE CHAIR LOUNGE CHAIR
Rucs.--$461,0CL $112.70 Rug-:-$228441 $160.30
Reg-:-$146:011 $136.50

UMBRELLA
Reg.-$.34-2..aa $239.40

SOLID WHITE & YELLOW, EARTHTONE & PASTEL STRIPES

Replacement Cushions Available

marmel gifts & toys

28857 Orchard Lk. Rd. • Farmington Hills (Bet. 12 & 13 Mile Rds.) • 553-3250

50

FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1988

and her fear may deform or
mark the unborn child. This
ancient superstition is based
on the belief (which is not ex-
clusive to Jews) that the im-
pressions and emotions of the
pregnant woman affect the
child in utero.
Don't bring anything into
the house for the baby until
after it's born. Don't hold a
baby shower prior to birth. A
layette can be ordered, but
not delivered, until after the
birth. These beliefs are still
popular with Jews, reflecting
an attempt not to tempt fate
when the outcome of the
birth is unsure.
Babies: The red kineahora
bow attached to the crib and
the carriage is supposed to
protect against Lilith, the
mythological baby-stealer, as
well as the evil eye. The red
bow has been popular for cen-
turies with Eastern European
Jews and Southern Italians.
Refer to the baby as stupid
and ugly to trick a lurking
demon. This age-old supersti-
tion is still popular with Jews
and Chinese.

Don't bring
anything into the
house for the baby
until after it's born.
Don't hold a baby
shower. These
beliefs are still
popular with Jews.

Menstruation: The first
time a girl menstruates, her
mother must slap her face —
a custom still popular with
some Jews. The slap restores
"lost" blood to the girl's
cheeks and shows that the
mother is happy her daughter
has become a woman, but

feigns anger to fool jealous
spirits. It also serves as a
warning that she can now
disgrace her parents by
becoming pregnant out of
wedlock.
Marriage: The bride must
wear a white gown because
white symbolizes innocence
and penitence in many
cultures. Like the color red,
white is believed to ward off
the evil eye. Brides in ancient
Greece wore white as a sym-
bol of joy.
The bride must wear a veil
so that she will be hidden
from evil spirits who might
try to steal her away. The
biblical origin of this custom
is found in the story of Rebec-
ca, who takes a veil and
covers herself with it when
she first meets Isaac. The
chuppah (bridal canopy) sym-

bolizes the establishment of a
new home.
Rice (in the days of the
Roman Empire, wheat, too) is
thrown at the bridal couple to
ensure fertility and to
frighten away spirits. This
pagan custom was borrowed
by some Jews and is still
popular at Chinese, Italian,
and Greek weddings.
The groom must break a
glass on the first try to
demonstrate his ability to
crush his enemies. In Greece
and in other parts of Europe,
it is still popular to throw or
break a glass as a show of
strength and to insure good
luck on various occasions.
Moving: Jews traditionally
move on gliesdays for good
luck. The first items one
should carry into a new home
are salt, 18 pennies, sugar,
bread and, sometimes, a
broom. The belief in salt as an
antidote for bad luck is
almost universal. The number
18 is "chai" in Hebrew,
representing life or luck, thus
the pennies are for prosperity.
Bread is for sustenance.
Sugar is for a sweet home.
Some Jews, as well as gen-
tiles, believe that a broom will
sweep in good luck, while
sweeping out bad luck.
Travel: "Start your trip out
with the right foot, to start
the trip out right" is an old
superstitious saying based on
the belief that the right side
of the body is protected by a
helpful spirit, while the left
side is the domain of a demon.
In folklore, the right side is
often portrayed as the seat of

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