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June 10, 1988 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-06-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

YOU ALONE CAN DO IT,
BUT YOU CAN'T DO IT ALONE . • •

• DO YOU "LIVE" TO EAT?
• DO YOU HAVE TROUBLE SAYING NO?
• TOO MUCH TO DO, TOO LITTLE TIME?

CALL 647 - 5540

Montevideo on this," Eisen-
berg said. Hopefully, he said,
the current revision of the
Uraguayan criminal code will
address minority rights.
"We're hoping for a package
of rights protections with
criminal penalties," said
Eisenberg.

Summit Confuses
Soviet Activists

The Moscow summit is
history, and once again Soviet
Jewry groups are faced with
a bittersweet problem: how to
maintain the momentum in
the the wake of President
Reagan's meetings with
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorba-
chev.
"We're absolutely thrilled
about the priority the ad-
ministration placed on the
human rights question," said
one Soviet Jewry activist who
has spent recent days trying
to harvest information from
administration officials.
"The situation is somewhat
reminiscent of the last sum-
mit: The public speeches were
impressive, but it's difficult
for us to find out what actual-
ly happened at the working
level. There's a good chance
we'll never know exactly what
happened."
As a result, Soviet Jewry
groups are dangling between
the soaring expectations
fueled by all the razzle-dazzle
summitry and the harsher
realization that progress in
this kind of diplomacy always
lags behind the public
pronouncements.
"It's a tactical problem,"
said a staffer for a con-
gressman who has been ac-
tive on the Soviet Jewry issue.
"How do you decide where to
go next, when you're not ex-
actly sure where you've
been?"

1

;

Israel-Japan
Relations

/-

The planned visit of Jap-
anese Foreign Minister
Sosuke Uno to Israel later
this month represents a
promising change in the
troubled relations between
those two countries and a
quiet triumph for a coalition
of Jewish activists in
Washington.
"It's a ground-breaking
event, and a change long over-
due," said David Harris,
Washington representative of
the American Jewish Com-
mittee. "It holds out the
possibility of continued im-
provement in the political
and economic spheres."

Japanese-Israeli relations
have been strained by Japan's
overwhelming dependence on
Middle East oil, a factor
which has led to that coun-
try's cooperation with the
Arab boycott. The recent
wave of anti-Semitism in
Japan is also a factor in
diplomatic tensions between
Tokyo and Jerusalem.
In the last year, groups such
as the American Jewish Com-
mittee and the Anti-
Defamation League have
worked energetically to sen-
sitize the Japanese govern-
ment to the need for better
relations with Israel.
According to several con-
gressional sources, subtle
pressure from an assortment
of legislators helped nudge
the Japanese government off
dead-center. Included on that
list are Reps. Stephen Solarz
(D-N.Y.), Larry Smith (D-Fla.),
Dan Glickman (D-Kan.) and
Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.). On
the Senate side, Arlen
Specter (R-Pa.) has been a
vocal supporter of improved
Japanese-Israeli ties.
Other factors in the new
diplomatic initiative may be
quiet pressure from Secretary
of State George Shultz and
Japan's efforts to thwart what
it sees as "Japan-bashing" in
this country by projecting a
more positive image on the
international scene.

DEA FARRAH
MSW, ACSW, CSW

Does F-18 Sale
Include Missiles?

As official notification of
the administration's plan to
sell F-18 fighters to Kuwait is
expected this week, Hill
sources indicate that the ad-
ministration may be trying to
pull a fast one.
Originally, the sale was ex-
pected to include 40 F-18s, an
advanced, lightweight
fighter-bomber developed for
the navy. So far, only Canada,
Spain and Australia have
received F-18s.
But according to secret
testimony last week in Con-
gress, the administration may
be planning to tack on an ar-
ray of additional hardware.
administration's
The
argues that it is pointless to
sell airplanes without some-
thing to hang on the wings —
meaning missiles and support
equipment. Congressional
critics indicate they won't buy
that argument: The F-18s
themselves pose no threat to
Israel, but missiles and other
hardware could easily be re-
sold to some of Israel's near-
by adversaries.

• WEIGHT CONTROL
• INDIVIDUAL
COUNSELING

• STRESS MANAGEMENT
• ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING

HEALTHY OPTIONS, INC.
BIRMINGHAM

\ •

Not all Sinai doctors are Jewish. But

they've all got seychel, and they know
how to treat you like a mensch.

It's not easy to join the Sinai Medical
Staff. Applicants have to complete an
accredited residency program in a med-
ical specialty. They're expected to be cer-
tified by the national examining board in
that specialty. Their credentials are scru-
tinized by other physicians in their own
and related fields before they are rec-
ommended for appointment by the Board
of Trustees.

More than 300 members of Sinai's
Medical Staff are on the faculty of the
medical schools at Wayne State Univer-
sity or the University of Michigan or the
dental school at the University of Detroit.
We at Sinai get a lot of naches from
our medical staff. If your doctor is not a
member of the Sinai Hospital medical
staff, ask yourself one question—and ask
your doctor, too: WHY NOT?
If you don't have a doctor, or are look-
ing for a specialist, call our Physician
Referral Service. We'll be happy to make
a shidduch.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

31

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