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June 03, 1988 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CUSTOM FLORAL DESIGNS
By Jackie

Jewish Information Service

o „2 „o
0.0

Exotic and very unusual designs. Specializing in silk
floral arrangements for your every need. Fantastic
savings on silk trees.

111.■1•11.11.

0 b.

FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION

Call 967-HELP

Contact Jackie Schwartz 661.3660

Monday-Friday
9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Spirits Of The Southwest

at

MESA ARTS

Opening Preview

Friday, June 3, 1988 — 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Please join us and bring your friends!

LI N RD.

For the American Indian — they are real.
They move among the mountains and
mesas, they visit the sacred Divas, and they
live behind the pueblo walls. They are
kachinas and fetishes, creatures and critters.

14 MILE RD.
MESA APTS.
0 _111/

MESA ARTS

E

lU

32800 Franklin Road
Franklin, MI 48025
(313) 851-9949

SOUTHFIELD

ARTS

A weekend of fine, juried art sponsored by the Southfield Arts Council in cooperation
with the City of Southfield, featuring quality art sales and demonstrations. Oils,
watercolors, printmaking, creative clay works, fibers, sculpture and much more!

June 5

Noon - 6 p.m.

Southfield Civic Center • 26000 Evergreen Road • (at 10-1/2 Mile Road)

•Entertainment

-Food booths

•Children's activities (sponsored by Detroit Edison)

Free admission and parking!

Proceeds benefit the Bruce K. Schmidt
Grants and Scholarships Fund for
students in the visual and performing arts

For more information, telephone 354-1151

16

FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1988

Continued from Page 5

and a sixth which was
withdrawn won't come until
January.
The sixth amendment,
which would require each
constituent organization to
submit names of its Council
delegates and alternates each
year by January 1, was at-
tacked by Rabbi Ernst Con-
rad of Temple Kol Ami. The
rabbi called the proposal
unworkable.
The five changes passed by
the assembly included a
paragraph describing the
work of the Council, a
clarification of the role played
by the executive director, a
directive to each constituent
organization to certify the
number of its dues-paying
members each October, a
statement that the president
will carry out Council
business in consultation with
other officers between board
meetings, and a change
renaming the executive com-
mittee the board of directors.
In addition to Borman, a
representative of the Jewish
Welfare Federation, other of-
ficers elected were: Franklin
J. Ellias (Children of
Holocaust-Survivors Associa-
tion In Michigan), Dr.
Richard C. Hertz (Jewish War
Veterans) and Jeannie

Weiner (Maimonides Medical
Society Women's Auxiliary),
vice presidents; Alexander
Blumenberg (National Com-
mittee for Labor Israel),
secretary; and Berl Falbaum
(Jewish Community Center),
treasurer. All ran unopposed.
Elected to the board of
directors were: David L. Bit-
tker (B'nai B'rith Centennial
Lodge), Fred Frank
(American Jewish Commit-
tee), Fred. L. Goldenberg
(Cong. Beth Shalom), Barbara
K. Goldman (Federation),
Oscar Hertz (AJCommittee),
David B. Jaffe (AJCommit-
tee), Ronald Karp (Cong. Beth
Achim), Ibrran Leemis (Na-
tional Council of Jewish
Women), Annette Meskin
(Hadassah), Judge Susan
Moiseev (JCCenter), Rose
Schwartz (American Jewish
Congress), Marian Shifman
(Cong. B'nai David), Jessie P.
Stern (NCJW), Kathleen
Straus (AJCommittee), Rabbi
M. Robert Syme (Zionist
Organization of America) and
Betsy Winkelman (Adat
Shalom Synagogue).
All were named by the
nominating committee.
Write-in board candidate
Marilyn Merdler (B'nai
B'rith Women) was the only
one on the ballot not elected.

Continued from Page 5

JUNE 4 &5

•Fine, juried art

Council

Aleynu

FESTIVAL '88

June 4
In a.m. - 9 p.m.

UP FRONT

GOT A QUESTION?

gall-FEU)
ollfc cura.

cluding Mandell Berman,
president of the Council of
Jewish Federations, Aleynu is
now seeking to expand its
programs to reach a wider
Jewish audience. It has run
10 "drive time" radio adver-
tisements the last two weeks
to attract students. Its
1-800-44-HEBRE(W) is part of
a national campaign "to help
people who let their Hebrew
slide, or don't know Hebrew at
all," Rabbi Iblwin says.
Five 90-minute sessions are
designed to help explain the
prayerbook and develop
synagogue skills "in a non-
confrontational way." A five-
week series has just begun,
and a new series is set for
August in advance of the
High Holy Days.
Aleynu also plans to expand
its kollel program. It has
sponsored lunchtime discus-
sion sessions at the Jewish
Welfare Federation, and will
host similar sessions at
downtown office firms and at
the Southfield cffice of The
Jewish News.
"People say that our
children are our future," says
Rabbi Iblwin, "but we are
their models. If our children
do not see us involved in
Jewish study, they will not be
involved. Without study

Judaism is an empty shell."
Rabbi Tolwin is a computer
consultant who works part-
timeon his Aleynu project.
Born in Israel, he grew up in
Milwaukee, taught at Aish
Ha-lbrah in Jerusalem for 10
years and at Bais Yacov and
United Hebrew Schools in
Detroit. He is assisted in
Aleynu by volunteers Yehudis
Rabinowitz, Irving Weisberg
and Rabbi Fishel Mael.
Aleynu does not charge for
its classes, "but we urge our
students to return next week
and bring a friend with them.
It's like any other product: if
you don't give a quality class
then the people will not
return," Rabbi Tolwin says.
"If people have a little
social group, call us
(968-3000). We'll design a pro-
gram and come to you:'

-

A New Name

New York (JTA) — Israel's
Everyman's University has
changed its English name,
and from now on will be
known as The Open Univer-
sity of Israel.
The 14-year-old institution
combines independent study
with extensive tutorial

services.

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