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May 27, 1988 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CLOSE-UP

WE CAN MAKE YOU A
FLORAL ARRANGEMENT FOR
ANY ROOM IN YOUR HOME

casual
living
modes

contemporary
• furniture
• lighting
• wall decor
• gifts
• interiors

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357-2030

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • HOME • OFFICE

YOUR BODY SHOPPE INC.

YOUR HAIR REPLACEMENT HEADQUARTERS

"Serving the Finest Clientele for over 12 Years„ ."

Contemporary
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Your Body Shoppe offers you a choice
of several excellent NATURAL hair
replacement programs. A FREE personal
consultation will help select the options
best suited to meet your needs.

• Private Studio
• Hair Fusion
• Hair Pieces
• Tanning

2328 Livernois • Suite D
Troy MI

CALL 528-2506

Advertising in The Jewish News
Gets Results
Place Your. Ad Today.
Call 354-6060

544•1711
22961 Woodward, Ferndale, MI

Southfield,
West Bloomfield,
Birmingham, and the
New Sport Connection*

nn al
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nt Sa e



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SUPER SPECIALS

Brass Boot Leather
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Nunn Bush Huaraches

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15

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Values to s105,Now $

$ 25

Rockport Super-Sport
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$3988

'78 Value, Now

Bally Taurus Dress
Cole•Haan Suede
Camp Mocs. $2988 Shoes
$6988

$10

Leather Summer Dress
Shoes

Southfield
The Onginar
In The
New Orleans Mall
10 Mile & Greenfield
Mon -Thurs & Sal 10-7
Fri. 10.9
Sun. 12-5 • 559-7818

Bostonian Decksiders

$5

Value, Now

'175 Value, Now

Johnston & Murphy Wing
Fila Original Gym
Shoes
$3988 Tip and Tassel $6988

Value, Now

$155 Value, Now

MV.,411.AAIN

Southfield
SPORT CONNECTION •
New Orleans Mall
10 Mule & Greenfield
Mon.-Thurs. & Sat. 10-7
Fri 10-9
Sun. 12-5 • 559-7150

West Bloomfield

On The Boardwalk
Orchard Lake Road
South of Maple
Mon.-Wed. & Sat. 10-7
Thurs. & Fri. 10-9
Sun. 12-5 • 626-3362

Downtown
Birmingham

111 S. Woodward

South of Maple
Mon -Wed. 8 Sat. 10.6
Thurs & Fri. 10-9
Sun. 12.5 • 647-0550

Flint
Oak Brook Square
3192 Linden Road
Across from Genessee
Valley Mall
Mon., Fri. 6 Sat. 10.9
Tues.-Thurs. 10-7
Sun. 12-5 • 733-8730

A Solid Record

Continued from preceding page

then AFL president, the JLC
met with representatives of
the State Department to
discuss the plight of the Euro-
pean Jews. This resulted in
the U.S. administration issu-
ing a number of emergency
visas to Jewish, labor and
democratic leaders being
persecuted in Nazi Germany.
Green, in 1942, also ad-
dressed the JLC in Canada in
a speech later printed under
the compelling title, "The
Common Enemy of
Mankind?'
The passionately worded
speech is replete with phrases
that conjure the vision of a
speaker veritably shaking
with drama and fervor. "Ibr-
ror and pain are their daily
bread," Green said of Hitler's
prey. "From thousands of
miles away, their suffering
reaches us here and cries out
to us. Yes, we cannot say it's
too bad that these countless
men, women and children are
suffering but it is none of our
business. For it is definitely
the business of every pro-
gressive person, of every de-
cent American man and
woman!'
Truth be told, however, it
was not the plight of the
persecuted Jews that really
sparked the decision by the
AFL and CIO to publicly
fight the Nazis.
The real impetus for the
unions' actions was Hitler's
own antagonism toward labor.
His first purges were against
trade unionists.
"The (trade union) perspec-
tive on Nazis was that the
Nazis were anti-labor,"
Waltzer said. "The perspec-
tive was not that the Nazis
were waging a war against
the Jews, but that the Nazis
were against labor and all
other minorities!'
In response, the AFL ex-
ecutive council began by call-
ing for a boycott of all Ger-
man manufactured goods as
early as 1933.
Labor also held "Stop
Hitler Now" rallies in cities
throughout the country, in-
cluding a famous gathering
in Madison Square Garden in
April 1943.
Yet the AFL, Waltzer said,
"was strongly committed to
maintaining the structure of
the immigration laws as they
existed at that time. And that
structure was restrictionist!"
By 1943, the AFL and CIO
became more flexible in their
attitude toward immigration.
In a rare act of unanimity, the
two groups made several
moves — in addition to the ef-
fort with the JLC — to help
the European Jews. They sup-
ported a congressional resolu-
tion on refugees and gave
backing to free emigration for

Jew's to Palestine.
lb this day, the AFL-CIO
continues to speak out
against Nazis. Last year, for
example, the trade federa-
tion's executive council
adopted a resolution calling
_ on the United Nations to open
the Allied War Crimes Com-
mission files which contain
the names of thousands of
suspected Nazis.
In the resolution, the AFL-
CIO said, "Continued opposi-
tion to this important source
of information acts as an im-
pediment to the punishment
of those guilty of crimes
against humanity!'
AFL-CIO President
Kirkland has called for
labor's financial support of
the National Holocaust
Memorial Council museum in
Washington and the labor
federation's executive council
condemned, in 1985, the
alleged American role in
gaining freedom for Nazi war
criminal Josef Mengele.

"The (trade union)
perspective on
Nazis was that the
Nazis were anti-
labor. The
perspective was
not that the Nazis
were waging a war
against the Jews,
but that the Nazis
were against labor
and all other
minorities."

Last year, the American
Federation of Teachers helped
sponsor a two-week visit of
three West German teachers
who came to the United
States to study Holocaust
education programs.
The labor federation also
condemns acts of anti-
Semitism. In January, the
Rhode Island AFL-CIO
unanimously adopted a
resolution condemning in-
cidents in which swastikas
were painted on two
synagogues in Providence
and two Jewish-owned
pharmacies.
In a letter to the JLC,
Rhode Island AFL-CIO Presi-
dent Edward McElroy asked
that Jewish leaders be sent a
copy of the resolution.
"I feel," he wrote, "that it is
important that they receive
this statement of our support
for the investigation and pro-
secution of those responsible
for these incidents, and our
support for efforts to educate
the community concerning
the dangers and results of
such intolerance."
— Elizabeth Kaplan

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