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May 27, 1988 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UP FRONT

Handbags
Jewelry
Accessories

WE HAVE A LARGE SELECTION OF

GRADUATION CARDS
50% OFF

STOP IN SOON TO GET THE BEST SELECTION.

BEL-CREST
PHOTO
6698 ORCHARD LAKE ROAD



Luggage
Briefcases
Wallets

REMEMBER THE
DADS & GRADS!

IN THE WEST BLOOMFIELD PLAZA

851-5840 1

A

04 416

1 1

APPLEGATE 357-1800
TRAVELERS TOWER 356-1800

1/25A.

THE JEWISH NATIONAL FUND OF DETROIT

Invites you to attend the

Keter Shem Toy Award Dinner

honoring

SENATOR JACK FAXON

In Recognition of his leadership, many services and con-
tributions to the community, the State of Michigan, the
Nation and the State of Israel.

MONDAY, JUNE 13, 1988

Congregation Shaarey Zedek
27375 Bell Road, Southfield
Cocktails: 6 p.m.
Dinner: 7 p.m.
Convert $175

General Chairman:

HAROLD BERRY

Dinner Co-Chairpersons:

Leon Cohan
Richard Doerer
Sam Frank
David Hondleman

Bob Jacobs
Ira Jaffe
William Kahn
Dr. Charles Kessler

SUE ELLEN EISENBERG

President
JNF Council of Greater Detroit

William Kessler
Harold & Barbara Marko
Milton J. Miller

Joseph Nederlander
Joel Nosanchuk
Spencer M. Partrich

EDWARD ROSENTHAL

Executive Director
JNF Council of Greater Detroit

For further information and reservations, please call

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

(313) 557-7016 or (313) 557-7059

12

FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1988

I

Leon Cohan

Continued from Page 5

person outside of the black
community who contributes
outstanding service to the
black community.
During his term, Cohan
also was awarded the Israel
Histadrut Memorial Award
for leadership and the
Fellowship Award of the
American Arabic and Jewish
Friends of Metropolitan
Detroit.
"He acted to bring in good,
young leadership and did an
effective job of reaching out to
key ethnic leaders," said
Allan Gale, acting director for
the JCCouncil. "He raised
the stature of the organiza-
tion in the non-Jewish com-
munity."
Cohan, 58, came to the
Jewish Community Council
as a behind-the-scenes
strategist who was well
respected by politicians, yet
unknown to the public.
His resume includes a
12-year stint as deputy at-
torney general of Michigan
and 15 years at Detroit
Edison, where he currently
holds the position of senior
vice president and legal
counsel. Aside from his 25- to
30-hour a week JCCouncil
role, Cohan serves as chair-
man of the Michigan Board of
Ethics and chairman of the
Michigan Council for the
Arts. Gov. James Blanchard
appointed Cohan to both
boards.

Leon Cohan:
Stepping up.

"I learned a lot and met a
lot of good people," said
Cohan, who will continue to
serve on the JCCouncil's ex-
ecutive committee. Cohan
said he intends to speak out
more openly on Jewish issues.
Paul D. Borman, JCCouncil
treasurer during the Cohan
administration, will take over
the helm. He ran unopposed
for the Council's highest
volunteer office.
The Council has hired
David Gad-Harf, executive
director of the Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council in
St. Louis, to be the new ex-
ecutive director. He will
replace Alvin Kushner, who
retired in March.

Apartments

Continued from Page 5

freeway is under construction
behind the Jewish Center.
The deck will have a "passive
park," according to Naimark,
containing walking paths,
benches and a small play
area. A more active park was
constructed on the first deck,
east of Church Street behind
Congregation B'nai Moshe,
which includes a baseball dia-
mond and a small parking
lot.
The two decks, and a third
to be constructed east of
Southfield Road, were
negotiated by representatives
of the Orthodox community to
allow pedestrian access from
the heavily Jewish
neighborhoods north of the
freeway to the Orthodox
synagogues along 10 Mile
Road.
The decks and the Phase IV
apartments were considered
compensation to Oak Park
and Southfield for the homes
and apartments taken by the
freeway.
Naimark credited Mark
Schlussel and two Oak Park
mayors, the late David
Shepherd and current Mayor
Charlotte Rothstein, for get-

ting the decks in place. "They
were a long time in coming?'
Naimark said. "We had a
tough time getting
Washington to accept the fact
that they had made a commit-
ment. Finally, three years
ago, Charlotte Rothstein took
a delegation to Washington,
rounded up the Levins (Carl
and Sander) and other politi-
cians behind her, and pound-
ed on the table?'

NEWS h"--

Veggies Push
Prices Up

Tel Aviv (JTA) — An unex-
pectedly high increase in the
cost-of-living index in April
has caused concern in govern-
ment, labor and management
circles.
The rise was 2.7 percent,
which works out to an annual
inflation rate of over 20 per-
cent, double the rate hoped
for by the Finance Ministry.
The culprit was a net rise of
more than 20 percent in the
prices of fruits and
vegetables.

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