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April 29, 1988 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SERVING DETROIT'S JEWISH COMMUNITY

THIS ISSUE 60r

Community Applauds
Israel Achievements

HEIDI PRESS

News Editor

Detroit Jewry will demonstrate
its support for Israel and celebrate
her achievements at three major
events on Sunday in observance of the
Jewish state's 40th anniversary.
At 10 a.m. at the Maple/Drake
Jewish Community Center, Jewish
Festival '88 will begin. It is a free day-
long event showcasing Jewish and
Israeli foods and entertainment,
children's activities and the works of
Israeli artist Raphael Abecassis. A
special appearance by the Maxwell

APRIL 29, 1988 / 12 IYAR 5748

CLOSE-UP

Street Klezmer Band will highlight
the event, sponsored by the Detroit
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee.
At 11:30 a.m., the Jewish Welfare
Federation's annual Walk for Israel
will begin at the Maple/Drake Center.
More than 1,100 persons have
registered for the walk, according to
Marlene Borman, who with her hus-
band, Paul, are the co-chairmen of the
Israel 40th Anniversary Committee,
under whose sponsorship many of the
anniversary activities are planned.
At 7 p.m. that day at Tel-12 Mall,

Continued on Page 20

Demjanjuk Case
Re-Opens Wounds

ALAN HITSKY

Associate Editor

Relations between the Ukrainian
and Jewish communities may be at a
low point following the conviction and
death sentence handed down in Israel
for John Demjanjuk, the Treblinka
death camp's Ivan the Terrible.
Yet liaisons between the two
groups, both locally and nationally,
believe relations will warm as the
Demjanjuk case fades from media
attention.
Phoenix attorney Bill Wolf was in
Detroit last weekend to address the
Ukrainian-American Bar Association
on "The Jewish-Ukrainian Relation-
ship in Times of Trouble!' Wolf, who
is Jewish, said the Demjanjuk verdict
and the "complaints of the Ukriai-
nian community will make it dif-
ficult, but we have to continue to work
together!'

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Wolf and two Phoenix associates,
including a Ukrainian, have been
dogging the American Bar Associa-
tion for two years to end a pact with
the Soviet Union. The ABA executive
board voted last Friday to allow the
cooperative agreement to expire in
June. Opposition to the agreement
has been spearheaded by Jewish and
Ukrainian groups unhappy with
Soviet human rights policies.
Jaroslaw Dobrowolskyj, a Detroit
attorney who chairs the Ukrainian-
American Bar Association of
Michigan, told The Jewish News that
the verdict on Demjanjuk "would not
jeopardize our relationship on the
ABA pact!' But, Dobrowolskyj added,
"Ukrainians are outraged that we are
portrayed as the Nazi henchmen!"
As a criminal attorney,
Dobrowolskyj believes "any jury
would have found a reasonable doubt.

Continued on Page 42

In The
Uprising's
Shadow

CONTENTS PAGE 7

JEWISH RITE
OF PASSAGE

Has the Bar Mitzvah party
gained more importance
than the ceremony?

A SPECIAL REPORT

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