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April 22, 1988 - Image 82

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IOlt

Right in Your
Own Driveway!

).*

THE HOUSE OF QUALITY
FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA

Fresh Live

Fresh Florida

MAINE
LOBSTERS
11/4 lb. avg.

$6.95 lb.

w/coupon exp. 4/30/88

w/coupon

I "

11 Mile

MAHI MAHI
(Dolphin)

$6.951b.

exp. 4/30/88

$5.95

Comes to your home or office
with the garage-on-wheels

Valet service that doesn't
cost one penny extra

• Expert diagnostic tune-up
• Electronic analyzer -
all engine systems
• Professionally trained
mechanics
• Perfect results assured

lb.

Lw/coupon exp. 4/30/88

SUPERIOR FISH CO.

Expanded Services
Call Sanford Rosenberg
for your car problems

House of Quality

Serving Metropolitan Detroit for Over 40 Years

309 E. 11 Mile Rd., Royal Oak, MI • 541-4632

Parking in rear

/ THE
TUNE
--, -UP
1 MAN

Certified by the National
Automotive Institute of Excellence

Fresh Hawaiian

GROUPER
FILLETS

I COOKING

Mon.-Wed. 8-5
Thurs. & Fri. 8-6
Saturday 8-1

A Birthday Boy's
Favorite Foods

= 398-3805

GLORIA KAUFER GREENE

Special to The Jewish News

1NW SPRING
Daily 1..00 2,.m.27..00
Sunday T.00 a.M-6..00

THE
‘10 13 GET ALITY
B EST
QU CIE
T
LOWEST PRICES

California

SWEET STRAWBERRIES.

$119

IIIIII

qt,

Extra Fancy

GRANNY SMITH APPLES. .

I

I

I

49C

lb.

Extra Large

MOONLIGHT MUSHROOMS, . 99 C

FRESH SMOKED
LOX
$999 b.

LIMIT I LB.

lb. pkg.

FRESH ROMAINE
LETTUCE

FRESH CUT
FLOWERS
DAILY

39

lb.

16 oz. jar

FRESH SMOKED SHAD. ,

,,,,

I

Empire

CHICKEN HOT DOGS.

I I

I

S269

.....99 C

pkg.

Borden's 24 oz. container

COTTAGE CHEESE. .

I

I

I I

IIII

99

C

All Specials Good Through April 27th, 1988

I it

82

FRIDAY APRIL 22 , 1988

admit it! This is definite-
ly nepotism. But what's a
mother to do?! How could
I say "no" to my middle son
when he reminded me that
last October, I devoted an ar-
ticle to his brother's favorite
foods because the older one's
birthday happened to fall on
Friday, that is, a Detroit
Jewish News issue date.
And now, thanks to leap
year, Trevor's birthday is to-
day, another Friday. Natural-
ly, he felt that in all fairness
this article should be about
his favorite foods: I tried to
reason with him. Just turn-
ing eight, I explained, he real-
ly isn't old enough to do much
cooking on his own, and the
earlier article had been about
foods that adolescents cooked
and/or created all by them-
selves.
In general, it's better to
keep children away from the
stove because of the danger of
burns. But occasionally, with
close adult supervision, it's
great fun for them to stir a
batch of homemade pudding
and watch how it incredibly
thickens as it gets hotter, or
to mix up an omelet and see
how raw egg coagulates as it
is scrambled and fried.
Sometimes, youthful assis-
tance may take more time
and effort than the help is
worth, but it's an investment
in future potential. Having
my two older sons in the
kitchen can really be a boon
with certain meals. Of course,
I still have to plan the meal,
and organize the ingredients.
But Trevor and Dylan can
then take over specified tasks,
leaving me time for more in-
tricate preparations, or just
allowing me a moment to
take care of their whining
baby brother.
Cooking need not be only a
parent-child activity. In some
families (including my own),
it also works very well with
an older child guiding his
younger sibling. And patient
grandparents can be wonder-

ful when it comes to sharing
their cherished recipes and
techniques with eager grand-
children.
In addition, cooking is a
wonderful opportunity to
"sneak in" all sorts of educa-
tional experiences. When in-
gredients are being
measured, it's the perfect
time to do a little math prac-
tice, and also show a very
practical use for fractions.
(You can demonstrate how Y3
cup of something is really less
than 1/2 cup, even though 3 is
more than 2 — a confusing
concept for some kids.)
While eggs are cooking into
an omelet or custard, children
can actually see how proteins
coagulate and learn other
aspects of organic chemistry.
And, air whipped into egg
whites or heavy cream is a
physical reaction that always
intrigues children. (If they get
carried away and overbeat the
cream, turn the lesson into
one on making homemade
butter!)
Even history and geography
can come into play when you
prepare foods from your fami-
ly's ancestral homeland (the
"old country") or other inter-
national dishes from all over
the world. Traditional Jewish
foods — particularly those
prepared specifically for a
holiday — provide a wonder-
ful opportunity to explain
why certain foods are eaten
on certain occasions.
And, in this era of concern
about more healthful eating,
children can be taught why
some foods are better for
them than others, and shown
exactly the ingredients that
go into certain foods (for in-
stance, the large amount of
fat in most cookies).
Finally, an added bonus of
teaching children to cook:
most youngsters are much
more likely to try (and en-
joy) a new dish that they
have helped prepare, even
if it might be somewhat
unfamiliar.
Following are Trevor's two
very favorite dishes, foods he
often helps me prepare and
Continued on Page 84

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