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April 22, 1988 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sadness and Joy Mark Israel Holidays

bravely, afraid his friend might
pout again. "But I can't figure out
why."
"What do you think it is?"
"Are you sure you want me
to tell you?"
"Eh," Aleph apologized
sheepishly. "I don't know why I
get so carried away at times. Of
course I want you to tell me."
"I think it might be. an Israeli
flag."
"Don't tell me what it looks
like!" Aleph thought at once. "I
know the flag of Israel has two
blue stripes on a white
background with a blue, six-
pointed Star of David in the
middle." Aleph sighed. "There's
one hanging over there by the
windows."
"Then you aren't mad at me
for pouting?"
"Ah, Aleph, my friend," Ayin
thought with a smile. "You may
not be a native Israeli, but you
are thorny and prickly as a
sabra."
Aleph thought about that
then returned Ayin's smile. "But
sweet on the inside?"
Ayin again smiled, agreeing.
"And sweet on the inside!"
"Exactly my point," Ayin
answered his friend. "Why would
the teacher need to order another
flag?"
"Oh Ayin," Aleph explained. _
"You must have been dozing
when the teacher discussed Yom
Haatzmaut."
"Yom Haatzmaut?"
"The holiday celebrating the
date when Israel became a state
— Israel Independence Day."
"I know Israel became a
state on May 14, 1948," Ayin
answered. "But this is almost the
end of April, we wouldn't be
celebrating that now."
"You have something to
learn," Aleph stated smugly.
"May 14, 1948 was 5 lyar 5708
on the Hebrew calendar. So, of
course, we celebrate it on the
fifth of lyar. (This year it's today.)
"Ah," Ayin said. "I forgot!
--
And the flag?"
"It's going to be carried in
the parade celebrating Yom
Haatzmaut," Aleph informed his
friend.
"I see," said Ayin. "It seems
we both learned about Israel
today."

Reprinted by permission of "The
Shofar" magazine, May 1986 edition.

In celebration of Israel's 40th
anniversary, L'Chayim is
inaugurating a Hebrew lesson. The
monthly lessons will be prepared by
Nira Lev, associate professor of
Hebrew language and literature at
the Midrasha College of Jewish
studies. Mrs. Lev also teaches
Hebrew language and literature at
the Community Jewish High School
at the United Hebrew Schools.
Following is this month's
lesson:
David, visiting his mishpacha in
Yisrael, woke up baboker to the
sound of tzfeera.
"Ma-ze?" David asked Danny,
his cousin, with whom he was
staying.
"This tzfeera marks the
beginning of Yom Hazikaron, the
day of remembrance of our
geeboreem, the chayaleem who fell
in action for our medinah,"
answered Danny.
"But I thought we came to
Yisrael to participate in the chagigot
of Yom Haatzmaut, the happy chag,
celebrating Israel's independence. I
see the dgaleem and the
keeshooteem everywhere; I heard
about the chagigot, the reekoodeem
in all town squares and the
performances that we were going to
see tonight."
"Nachon," said Danny, "but in
Yisrael, Yom Haatzmaut is preceded
by Yom Hazikaron and the two are
closely tied together. Yisrael had, to
pay a high price for our atzmaut
and our simchah for having our
medinah is mingled with deep pain
and sadness for geeboreem who
lost their lives in the milchamot that
are still not over in Yisrael. At 10
baboker there will be another
tzfeera, and everybody will stop all
activity and stand up for two
moments of silence in memory of
our fallen chayaleem." At 7 p.m. the
last tzfeera will be heard to mark
the end of Yom Hazikaron and the
beginning of the chagigot of Yom
Haatzmaut, the day of the
declaration of Medinat Yisrael, a
home for all Jews in the world.

Vocabulary

_
zikaron
atzmaut
yom
mishpacha
Yisrael
boker
baboker
tzfeera
ma ze?
geeboreem
(geebor
chayaleem

soldier)
(chayal
state
medinah
celebration
chagigot
a celebration)
(chagiga
a holiday
chag
flags
dgaleem
a flag)
(degel
decorations
keeshooteem
a decoration)
(keeshoot
dances
reekoodeem
a dance)
(reekood
(that's) correct, (it's) right
nachon
happiness, joy
simchah
wars
milchamot
a war)
(milchama
the State of Israel
Medinat Yisrael

Recommended
Reading

Heroes and Hustlers, Hard Hats
and Holy Men, by Ze'ev Chafets; an

excellent, realistic book, offering an
insider's view of the real Israel,
written with- wit, humor and affection

by a Pontiac, Mich.-born American
who immigrated to Israel in 1967
and made it his home.
The State of Israel, by Israel
Naamani, a good resource book to
find information about Israel's
geography, history, society,
institutions, religion, culture,
economy, security problems, laws
and education, as well as Israel's
relations with the Arabs.

Family Activity

Start a collection of Israeli
stamps and coins. Start collecting -
articles from the newspapers about -
Israel today. Try some Israeli foods
such as falafel and hoummus. Ask
people who go to Israel to bring
back postcards of interesting places.
Start a scrapbook with pictures and
articles relating to Israel. Borrow
from the library an Israeli movie, for
example Hill Number 24 Doesn't
Answer.

BOOKS

A Century of Ambivalence, adults, at Spitzer's. Teddy
Kollek — Mayor of Jerusalem, Naomi Shepherd; Off the
Beaten Track in Israel, Ori Devir; One People: The Story
of the Eastern Jews, Dr. Dvora and Rabbi Menachem
Hacohen; The Jewish Travel Guide, edited by Sidney
Lightman; Oscar Israelowitz's Guide to Jewish U.S.A.;
Israel on Your Own, Harriet Greenberg; and Contemporary
Russian Cuisine, Irina Chernomordik, all at Borenstein's.

CHILDREN'S BOOKS

From Head to Toe, Yaffa Ganz, at Spitzer's and
Borenstein's. And Then There Were Four, Miriam Elias;
Soon I'll Be . . ., Jacqueline Pliskin; Stories from the Life
of Ray Kook, Masha Fridman; The Gang of Four, Yaacov
Peterseil; The Mystery of the Missing Bar Mitzvah Gift,
Eliezer Gevirtz, all at Borenstein's.

AUDIO CASSETTES

memory
independence
day
family
Israel
morning
in the morning
a siren
what is it?
heroes
hero)
soldiers

Country Yossi Presents Kivi and Vol. Ill; If I Forget
Jerusalem; L'Chayim, Danny Baruch and Arie Broner; I
Will Arrange Your Praises, Shlomo Carlebach; Joy of
Torah, all at Borenstein's.

MISCELLANEOUS

I Love Yiddish, cassette and booklet mini-course,
edited by Emanuel S. Goldsmith, at Borenstein's.

Spitzer's is located at 21770 W. 11 Mile, Southfield.
Borenstein's is located at 25242 Greenfield, Oak Park.

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