100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

April 22, 1988 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRONTLINES

(0) WNAI TWTRIGITEHR FSATMAIDLYIUNNIGHT

Thursday, June 16, 1988, 7:30 p.m.
I Vs. TORONTO BLUE JAYS

Tickets Available Thru B'nai B'rith
25835 Southfield Rd., Sfld., MI 48075
Bus Transportation — Nominal Fee
For Additional Info. — 552-8177

— COMMUNITY INVITED —

COUNCIL THRIFT SHOPS

ELIZABETH KAPLAN

NEED YOUR MERCHANDISE

Staff Writer

New or gently used clean
men's, women's and
children's clothes, furn-
iture, household items.

For better deductions,
hang garment with a
plastic covering tied
together and labeled or
tagged. Keep a record
for the IRS.

Save the truck expense,
drop off at shops, or for
large pick-ups, call 258-
6000.

COUNCIL THRIFT SHOPS
L1 20430 Van Dyke, Detroit
893-4990
Open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday thru Saturday

221 East Lincoln, Royal Oak
542-2600
Open from 9 am. to 5 p.m.
Monday thru Saturday, until
7 p.m. Friday

SIDNEY FRIEDLAENDER, M.D.

ALEX S. FRIEDLAENDER, M.D.

ANNOUNCE THE RELOCATION

OF THEIR OFFICE

FOR THE PRACTICE OF

ALLERGY & IMMUNOLOGY

TO THE

SINAI HECHTMAN HEALTH CENTER

31500 TELEGRAPH

SUITE 140

BINGHAM FARMS, MI 48010

(313) 647-0590

AS OF APRIL 9, 1988

1 . 8

State Officials And Survivors
Pay wilibute To The Six Million

FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 1988

L

ansing —

As the bus
approached the state's
capital, one member of
the Detroit-area delegation
began to prepare for the up-
coming tribute to the Six
Million.
He took a red beret from a
small plastic bag and put it
on his head. Then he
straightened his jacket, the
pocket of which was covered
with multicolored combat rib-
bons and a Jewish War
Veterans badge.
And then he stepped off the
bus and marched quickly to
the capitol building.
Inside, the ceremony was
about to begin. Some 100 in-
dividuals from throughout
Michigan were seated in the
second-floor rotunda.
The April 11 event, which
marked the state's official
Holocaust commemoration,
was sponsored by the Jewish
Community Council of
Metropolitan Detroit and the
Department of Management
and Budget Director, Shelby
Solomon, and the manage-
ment and budget staff.
As the program started,
State Sen. Lana Pollack (D-
Ann Arbor) presented a
legislative declaration for
Holocaust week. Numerous
state representatives stood
beside Pollack as she read the
declaration, which recalled
the Holocaust and stressed
the importance of guarantee-
ing that such atrocities never
again happen.
In commemoration of the
45th anniversary of the War-
saw Ghetto Uprising, Pro-
fessor Kenneth Waltzer of
Michigan State University's
James Madison College,
delivered the keynote speech,
which focused on resistence
during the Holocaust.
Waltzer recalled those Jews
who were "determined to take
their fate into their own
hands and to fight and die
publicly, before the world's
eyes."
The Warsaw Ghetto Upris-
ing, which took place "in an
inconceivable world of the
dead and the dying," is only
one example of resistence, he
said. Waltzer also cited upris-
ings in the Treblinka, Sobibor
and Auschwitz death camps.
The Nazis, he said, could
not trample Jewish dignity
nor crush Jewish spirit, and
those who survived the terror
of the Holocaust should serve
as examples today.

"The Holocaust: An
Absence of Conscience," is the
title of the winning essay of a
contest sponsored by CHAIM,
Children of Holocaust Sur-
vivors Association in
Michigan. The essay was
written by Scott Castleman of
Bloomfield Hills.
Castleman read his essay
during the ceremonies, after
which he was congratulated
by Gov. James Blanchard.
In his remarks, Blanchard
recalled an experience from
his own schools days. As a stu-
dent at Ferndale High School,
he said, he once took a world
history course where several
students challenged that the

The resisters were
"determined to
take their fate into
their own hands
and to fight and
die publicly, before
the world's eyes."

Holocaust had ever occured.
In response, the teacher
brought a film made of
American soldiers liberating
Auschwitz. That film, Blan-
chard said, "made such a
deep, deep impression on me."
Blanchard said he takes
issue with those who assert
that the Holocaust is no dif-
ferent than any other atroci-
ty. While not wishing to
minimalize the agony of other
horrors, Blanchard said it is
"outrageous for people to sug-
gest the Holocaust was just
another event."
At the end of the program,
resisters and survivors came
to the front of the room to
light candles.
First came Leon Salomon,
who at only 17 years old join-
ed the partisans. Salomon
helped form a Jewish fighting
unit called "Revenge," so
named after the last words of
his sister, Chava, who asked
her brother to seek vengence
on the Nazi murderers.
Salomon was joined by
David Kahan, a survivor of
Auschwitz, where all his
family perished.
Jack Miller and Anna
Lengel joined in lighting the
second candle. Miller was a
soldier with the Russian ar-
my when he was captured by
the Germans. He escaped by
digging a tunnel with his
hands and pieces of wood,
then walked for 36 days
through German lines to re-
join the Soviet forces.

Lengel and her sister were
the only two of the 11
children in her family to sur-
vive World War II. At Skar-
zysko, one of the camps where
she was imprisoned, Lengel
chanced to see one of her
sisters, who was being held at
another nearby facility. When
the Germans decided to move
the latter camp, Anna and
her sister hoped to reunite.
Yet as she was running
through the forest to join An-
na, the sister was shot to
death by the Germans.
Next to light candles were
Zoltan Rubin and Agata
Rubin. His family sent to
Auschwitz, Zoltan Rubin
managed to escape with iden-
tification papers from a Chris-
tian friend until he was cap-
tured by the Germans in
1944. He later escaped from
Kleindenbach concentration
camp.
Agata Rubin was a prisoner
in Auschwitz, where all her
family was murdered.
Also lighting candles were
Saul Raimi of Mlawa, Poland
— a city with only 9,000 Jews
before the war — and Irene
Petrinitz, originally of
Czechoslovakia.
Interned in the Mlawa
Ghetto, Raimi smuggled food
to help his family survive.
When the ghetto was li-
quidated, he was deported to
Auschwitz and later to
Buchenwald, where he sur-
vived the infamous death
marches. He was 21 years old
when the American Army
liberated Buchenwald.
Born in Czechoslovakia,
Petrinitz was imprisoned at
Auschwitz, where she lost
most of her family.
Fifth to light candles were
Joshua Fishman and Berek
Rothenberg. As the two walk-
ed to the front of the room,
Rothenberg locked arms with
Fishman, who is blind.
Rothenberg, born in Poland,
was first taken to a labor
camp in Skarzysko before he
was sent to Buchenwald.
Fishman, also originally of
Poland, escaped from the
Nazis with his mother, two
sisters and brother to the
forest, where they lived for 18
months.
One day, Fishman and his
mother went out to get food.
When they returned, the rest
of the family had been shot
and their bodies chopped
apart.
Fishman and his mother
later joined the Russian par-
tisans, with whom they serv-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan