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April 15, 1988 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I BEST OF EVERYTHING

Fine Dining In A Contemporary Italian Setting

Complementary Valet Parking
Lunches Served Mon: Fri. 11 to 4 Dinners Mon.Thurs. 4 to 11, Fri. & Sat. til Mid.

Entertainment Nightly
Cocktail Hour 5 to 7

Catering For . . . Weddings,
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, etc.

OPERA NITE WITH
ITALIAN BUFFET
$ 11 95 per person

DIXIELAND JAll &
B-B-Q RIBS & CHICKEN

EVERY MONDAY
6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

per

'1295 person

1NCWDES: BAKED
POT. & SLAW

EVERY WEDNESDAY
6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

REGULAR MENU ALSO SERVED EVERY NITE

630 Woodward Bet. Fort & Congress • Detroit 961-2449:01

Kitchen Hours: Tues.-Thurs. 5 to 10, Fri. & Sat. 5 to 11
Closed Monday

BANQUET FACILITIES FOR
ALL OCCASIONS

Restaurant
Reservations
ested
Hiller Rd f ad
Orcha rd' 9

ff Ponliac Trail to Old
To Hiller l?ocr

OPEN 7 DAYS

MON.-SUN.

1 a.m. to 10 p.m.
FRANKLIN
SHOPPING CBITER.

Nwinvestere N. of 12

358-2353

PLATTERS FOR 2

WHOLE SLAB BBQ RIBS
$11.95
BBQ RIBS & CHICKEN COMBO . . . $10.95
WHOLE BBQ CHICKEN
$8.95
2-12 OZ. N.Y. STRIP STEAKS
$12.95

2 12 OZ. N.Y.

-

STRIP STEAKS &
4 JUMBO SHRIMPS

$14.95

COMPLETE MEALS WITH
GARLIC BREAD & DESSERT (Baklava, Rice Pudding or Ice Cream)

eizediour

One of Metropolitan Detroit's Most Beautiful
and Exciting Restaurant-Lounges

available for your
favorite occasion every Sunday (all day)
and Saturday from 12 to 5 p.m.

• Bar Mitzvah
• Shower
• Birthday

• Bat Mitzvah
• Banquet
• Sweet 16

• Wedding
• Anniversary
• Reunion

Tai so tikes! path Taw oK welt eats%
to gds* lest a .Wes.

call your host
PAT ARCHER: 358 3355

-

28875 Franklin Rd. at Northwestern & 12 Mile
Southfield, MI

60

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1988

It's Not Just The Food
That's Attracting The Crowd

DANNY RASKIN

Local Columnist

T

he Mystery Muncher
writes . . . "Wonder
why some highly-
touted restaurants remain
popular long after the open-
ing hoopla dies down and the
quality diminishes. TGI Fri-
day's was heralded when it
came to Southfield as unique,
trendy and with a flair sure
to attract the office gang to
sip and sup.
"The high-decibel din is
deafening but some regulars
believe that's part of the im-
age. The package includes
smiling, energetic young
waitpersons dressed in cutesy
outfits and leaping around
knocking themselves out to
please. That's supposed to be
upbeat and stimulating.
"Friday's menu was a book
of potpourri of meals from
plan-it-yourself omelets to
stir-fried anything to burgers
and gigantic salads. The din-
ing spot isn't noted for any
special meal. But yuppies
crowd the bar, whooping it up
and ignoring the dinners.
"Friday's remains noisy
Yuppieville with a frantic at-
mosphere not conducive to
relaxed, leisurely dining. The
menu has been scaled down
but not improved. The drinks
are weak and the coffee is
cold. The food is, at best,
mediocre and so are the
choices. But still they flock,
the young and the thirsty and
the loud.
"Carlos Murphy's is
another spot that has surviv-
ed in the fickle restaurant
market. The carnival at-
mosphere and bouncy servers
blend with the fruity
Margueritas. Not as busy or
noisy as Friday's, the menu at
C.M. is equally limited and
tasteless. The name promises
corned beef and cabbage and
tortillas supreme but the food
disappoints.
"Dining out in the Detroit
area isn't just for weekends
anymore. On a recent Tues-
day night, it seemed as
though half the population
decided to patronize a
restaurant.
"Out Telegraph and Maple
way you couldn't find a park-
ing spot at Beau Jack's, and
it was before 6 p.m. Even if
you were willing to brave the
usual long lines in this ever-
popular restaurant you had
absolutely no place to put
your car.
"The nearby Hogan's,
which seldom draws crowds,
was also jam-packed as was
its ample parking lot. We

decided to try Max and Er
ma's on Orchard Lake Road
and 14 Mile, expecting to
breeze in with no problem. We
found a place to leave the car
but nary a place to sit, not
even a stool at the bar. The
restaurant was jumping, kids
were floating colorful
balloons and everyone seem-
ed to be having a great time.
Was it worth the 30-minute
wait for a table? If you're in
a casual mood and you're not
starving for exotic dishes,
Max and Erma's is OK but
not a place you can't wait to
get back to.
"Speaking of casual eating
spots, whatever happened to
state Sen. Jack Faxon's bill to
provide beer and wine tavern
licenses to delis and other
small restaurants that can't
get permits to sell liquor?
Faxon believes beer and wine
would give these
establishments a shot in the
arm and they'd be better able
to compete in the
marketplace with booze-
serving dining spots. We hear
the reason Faxon's bill has
been withering on the vine is
because of the strong
restaurant association's lobby
against it. But it seems
there's enough business for
everyone and competition is
healthy.
"Faxon, who was the author
of Michigan's Clean Indoor
Air Act, banning smoking in
public places except for
designated areas, wants to
pass legislation strengthen-
ing his bill to make
restaurants increase seating
reserved for nonsmokers and
to put nonsmoking tables
closest to the main source of
fresh air.
"Faxon claims the bill will
make it easier for
nonsmokers to get a table
since abstainers now often
have to wait for tables while
tables in the smoking section
are plentiful. The legislation
says restaurants with a
seating capacity of 50 or more
should reserve half of their
seating for nonsmokers.
"What effect this would
have on restaurants is hard to
judge. Many former smokers
are reformed and are the most
intolerant of smoke-filled air.
But many died-in-the-wool
smokers may resent having to
wait for a table and perhaps
being shoved in a corner to
prevent them from offending
the nonsmokers.
"If restaurants reserved the
best and most tables for
patrons without kids, for ex-
ample, this may not sit too
well with parents. A little

more tolerance seems to be in
order. Kids and smoking can
be annoying. But nobody
would be discriminated
against and all must be ac-
commodated when they're
footing the bill.
"Speaking of the bill, diners
may be forced to swallow
higher menu prices as restau-
rants face added payroll taxes
that eat into the profits. A flat
service charge, instead of a
tip, may also be in your
future.
"Restaurants are now re-
quired to pay social security
taxes on tips earned by their
employees. The consumer will
be forcd to pay the price.
Restaurateurs say tips are
private transactions which
have nothing to do with the
employer. Some servers
deserve more and some less.
The IRS thinks otherwise.
"Automatic service charges
may make an inefficient
Waitperson even more lax.
The recently imposed taxes
are the latest in a series of
federal requirements. In
1982, Congress passed an act
making employers keep
records of employees' tips for
reporting purposes. If total
tips don't equal eight perCent
of gross sales, the owner must
report which employee may
be under-reporting tips. This
is reputed to cause tension
between employer and
employee.
"Washington again impos-
ed controls in 1984 by requir-
ing employers to pay federal
unemployment taxes on in-
come derived from tips.
Legislation enacted in the
past feW years has resulted in
higher costs and decreased
expansion, according to some
restaurateurs, who maintain
the cost will be passed on to
the consumer. If it gets bad
enough, some restaurants
may have to go out of
business.
"Liquor-serving
establishments now must
carry at least $50,000 of in-
surance to comply with
Michigan's Dramshop Act of
1986. The Dramshop Act is
intended to cut down on the
number of frivolous lawsuits
filed against bar owners.
"In turn, bar owners were
to carry at least some in-
surance so accident victims
could expect some compensa-
tion. Mandatory insurance
would also induce bar owners
to act responsibly and refuse
to serve drunken drivers since
a lawsuit would drive up in-
surance premiums.
"The dispute over in-

Continued on Page 62

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