100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

April 15, 1988 - Image 57

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ENTERTAINMENT

Mary Steenburgen, left, stars as Miep Gies, the courageous Dutch woman who risks her life
to hide Anne Frank, portrayed-by Lisa Jacobs in Sunday's special.

The Attic

Sunday's TV special recalls how a
non-Jewish Dutch woman helped to
hide Anne Frank and her family

ter of chaos was a young woman's
diary, scripted with dreams that were
to be as ephemeral as the Nazis' plan
to sweep the world of its Jews.
Discovering the diary of Anne
Frank in the rubble was Miep Gies,
an employe of Otto Frank's who would
employ her own system of saving the
Franks and their friends. It was Miep
and her husband Jan who secreted
them all away in the attic on July 6,
1942, where they remained for two
anxious years until the Nazis broke
through the door and shattered their
lives.
It was also Miep Gies who
brought the world's attention to the
Anne Frank diary, which was
published to great acclaim and serv-
ed as a source for a play and subse-
quent movies.
Now, Miep's own story serves as a
source of a wonderful television movie
airing Sunday night at 9 on Channel
2. CBS-TV's The Attic: The Hiding of
Anne Frank, a General Foods Golden
Showcase presentation, stars
Academy Award-winning Mary
(Melvin and Howard) Steenburgen as
Miep Gies and Paul (A Man for All
Seasons) Scofield as Otto Frank.
Lisa Jacobs, whose credits include
a London production of Fiddler on the
Roof portrays Anne Frank.
The Attic is a story of quiet
heroism, of a then-young Dutch
woman who risked her future for the
Franks, who tried to save a family
and salvage some morality in an im-
moral time. It is a story that actress
Steenburgen believes bears repeating.
"It is easy to say that we've all
seen it before!' Steenburgen says of
the story of the Franks. "But it is a
story that is a special gift to the
world, a very special gift.
"As long as there is prejudice and
bigotry in the world, this story has
impact and has meaning. Seeing
stories such as this is a good way to
prevent other holocausts from hap-
pening again. This is the best in-
surance that a holocaust would not
happen again.
But insurance policies must be
renewed constantly if they are to
mean something. "I can only hope,"
says Steenburgen, "that this movie
will!'
It has meant something to her. "I
read the screenplay and the book" —
the film is based on Anne Frank
Remembered, by Miep Gies and
Alison Leslie Gold — "and I knew I
wanted to play this part very much.
As soon as you think the world is con-
quered, that there is no more pre-
judice .. .
Her voice trails off, but the trail
of existing hatreds in the world
doesn't fade. It is as prevalent as the
daily headlines.
"Playing this role made me
realize again what a privilege it is to
grow up in America, away from all
those evils" that are shown in the

.

MICHAEL ELKIN

Special to The Jewish News

loseted and cloistered
away in a cramped cor-
ner of a house that was
more cubbyhole than at-
tic, the Otto Frank fami-
ly had a distinctive Jewish eyewitness
view of the disintegrating morality
that was Hitler's Germany.
That their perspective was from a
peephole in an Amsterdam attic and

C

not in Germany itself was testimony
to the juggernaut of barbarism that
was Nazism, rolling over morals and
mortals in its onslaught of war-torn
Europe.
When the Nazis finally discovered
the Jewish Frank family and their
friends hiding away from the hatred
that goose-stepped through Holland,
they ripped through the attic, tearing
the Franks from their tentative grasp
of hope.
What they left behind in the clut-

GOING PLACES

WEEK OF April 15-21

COMEDY

HOLLY HOTEL
110 Battle Alley, Holly. Chris
Jakeway, "Donnell," Craig
McCart, today and Saturday,
Michael Blackman, Chris
Jakeway, Jef Brannan, Thursday
through April 23, admission,
634-1891.
DUFFY'S ON THE LAKE
3133 Cooley Lake Rd., Union
Lake, Bob Posch and John
Cionca, now through April, 9:30
and 11:30 p.m. Fridays and
Saturdays, admission,
reservations, 363-9469.
COMEDY CASTLE AT
PUZZLES
29900 Van Dyke, Warren, Dave
Coulier, today and Saturday,
Jimmy Aleck, Tuesday through
April 23, admission.

SPECIAL EVENTS

JEWISH WELFARE
FEDERATION
Neighborhood Project Family
Fun Day, Sunday, United
Hebrew Schools, 21550 W. 12
Mile, Southfield. 967-1112.

THEATER

ATTIC THEATER
Attic Theater Playhouse, 7339
Third Avenue, Detroit, Images,
Saturday, admission, 875-8285.
WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY
Hilberry Theater, Nicholas
Nickleby, today and Saturday,
admission, 577-2972.
MEADOW BROOK THEATER
Oakland University campus,
Rochester, Deathtrap, now
through Sunday, Harvey, four
weeks, beginning Thursday,
admission, 377-3300.
DETROIT REPERTORY
THEATER
13103 Woodrow Wilson, Detroit,
The Colored Museum, Mornings
at Seven, now through May 8,
admission, 868-1347.
BIRMINGHAM THEATER
211 S. Woodward, Birmingham,
Doubles, now through May 8,
David Groh, admission,
644-3533.
FISHER THEATER
Fisher Building, Detroit. Me and
My Girl, now through April 24.
Tim Curry, Donna Bullock,
Barrie Ingham. Admission.
872-1000.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN
SOCIETY
911 N. University, Ann Arbor,

THE DETROIT JEWISH, NEWS

57

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan