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April 08, 1988 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FROM THE RABBIS

The Vinkige Wine Shoppe

.

NEW YORK SELTZER
WATER (Assorted flavors)

INGLENOOK
WINES

$5.99
20% OFF

$ 8.99

3 liter

24/10 oz. btls.

We carry a full line
of

Beer, Wine & Liquor

ALL COCA COLA
PRODUCTS

SUTTER HOME
WHITE ZINFANDEL

$1.79/...$6.99/.... 3 for $ 1 00 0

750 ml

Prices good with ad / Expires 4/15/88
Mon-Thurs 9 am-10 pm • Fri-Sat 9 am-11 pm • Sun 12-8 pm

4137 Orchard bake Rd. • Just South of Pontiac Trail
WEST BLOOMFIELD
626-3235

CONGREGATION BINA' MOSHE

14390 W. Ten Mile / Oak Park

Invites you to a
Memorial Service to the 6 Million
and a reevaluation of their legacy
to the next generations
April 14, 1 . 988
7:30 P.M.

PROFESSOR
SID BOLKOSKY

of the
University of Michigan
will speak on

"flow to Talk To Your Children
and Grandchildren about
the Horrors of the Holocaust"

THE DETROIT FRIENDS OF BAR-ILAN UNIVERSITY

cordially invite you to their
DISTINGUISHED LECTURERS SERIES
featuring

DR. ARIE RIMMERMAN

School of Social Work, Bar-Ilan University
Ramat Gan, Israel

who will speak on

Jewish Identity from
Generation to Generation:
How to Guarantee
a Jewish Grandchild

A practical discussion on maintaining a strong
Jewish family in the Diaspora.

Thursday, April 14, 1988-7:45 p.m.

at

United Hebrew Schools—LaMed Auditorium

21550 West Twelve Mile Road / Southfield
Refreshments will follow the program
and there will be no solicitation of funds.

For further information,
call 423-4550

34

FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1988

Moral Demands Of Passover:
Share Our Good Fortune

RABBI RICHARD C. HERTZ

Special to The Jewish News

henever Passover
ends on the Sab-
bath, tradition
assigns a special Torah por-
tion to be read at the
synagogue Sabbath service —
Deuteronomy 14:22-16:17.
Here, among the special
statutes that distinguish the
ancient Israelite people as
special and different, are laws
of holiness repeated from
earlier texts in the Torah
which deal with dietary laws
and emphasize the
separateness of the Israelite
people. Then come laws of
tithing, especially the tithe to
maintain the Levites. These
are repeated as well as the
tithe to maintain the poor.
Finally, the portion comes
to the probable reason these
verses were assigned for this
particular Sabbath ending
Passover: the laws pertaining
to the three pilgrimage
festivals.
Tradition wants to teach
that Passover, as important as
it is in relating an historical
event, is but one of three
times in the year that our
ancestors were to go up to the
Temple in Jerusalem with
their fruits of the field.
Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot
are once more identified as
the three times in the year
when special agricultural
events identify the Jewish
way of life. Interestingly
enough, scripture does not
here mention the High Holy
Days but instead emphasizes
the three pilgrim festivals
that require a visit to the cen-
tral sanctuary.
Historically, the pilgrim
festivals were to be celebrated
in the Temple. After its
destruction by the Romans in
the year 70, the celebration of
the three festivals was
transferred to the home and
to the new sanctuaries aris-
ing in the Diaspora, the
synagogues.
The pilgrim festivals are
biblical in origin, as our
Torah portion • indicates.
These festivals have changed
greatly in observance as a
result of the wanderings of
the Jewish people throughout
history. All three festivals ask
that Jews set aside these
special times and interrupt
their daily occupations in
order to give thanks to God
for having delivered our

W

Dean Gould, Arthur Liss

Chairmen

Dr. Hertz is rabbi emeritus of
Temple Beth El.

Rel igious News Service

ALL WINES
Excluding Sale Items

The Torah reminds us that the Jews were once slaves in Egypt to kindle
sympathy for the underprivileged.

ancestors from slavery
(Pesach), giving them the
Torah (Shavuot), and enabl-
ing them to harvest the

Since all three pilgrim
festivals were agricultural in
their ancient origins, it is not
surprising that all three deal
with food. Passover is
Judaism's food festival par ex-
cellence. The seder meal
prescribes the kinds of food
that are required even as the
Haggadah weaves its stories
of the deliverance from
Egypt.
Isn't it significant that
these agricultural festivals
should deal with food, know-
ing how basic it is to human
existence? Concern for the
hungry, the poor and the or-
phaned, concern for the less
fortunate and concern for
those who have lost their way
in the world have historical-
ly been a trademark of the
Jewish way of life.
Today, the hungry and
homeless should have no less
a call upon our people as we
come to the end of celebrating
the Passover festival. And not
just with the Jewish poor, but
with all who suffer from the_
pain and indignities and
frustration of not having
enough to eat. The nightly
news focuses on far-off places
in distant continents of the
starving and the homeless.
Closer to home are those who
need our help.
Not the least of the moral
demands of our pilgrimage

festivals is the call to share
our good fortune with those
less fortunate than we.
Not forgotten at this
Passover season are the Jews
inside the USSR who know
there is a place to go in
freedom if they could only get
there. The matzah which
Jews in fortunate lands like
the U.S. and Israel have eaten

Concern for the
poor and hungry
has been a Jewish
trademark.

this Passover week remains
the symbol of hope that binds
the Jewish people everywhere
as one.
To me it seems almost
miraculous that thousands of
Hebrew slaves in ancient
Egypt who had no religion to
speak of, no culture, no tradi-
tion, could yet rise up and
establish their identity in
history's first freedom march
to a land promised them for
future deliverance.
The Passover story has thus
played an important role in
the development of Jewish
ethics. Frequently the Torah
reminds us the Jews were
once slaves in Egypt in order
to kindle sympathy for the
weak and underprivileged.
Jews know how it feels to
have been slaves. Therefore,
we understand how badly
others need our compassion,
mercy and charity.

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