100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

April 01, 1988 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"YOUR DOLLAR GOES TWICE AS FAR"

FOREIGN
ACCENT
REDUCTION

"Stay 2 Weeks - Pay for 1 Week" Room Rate Includes:

Individualized Program

3 Meals Daily Supervised by Dietician • Massages • Facial • Herbal Wrap
S•as for Men & Women • Unlimited Exercise & Yoga Classes • Sauna-Steam
Free Tennis & Clinic • Golf (Avail) • Nitely Dinner Dancin• & Shows

Joyce M. Hull, M.A., CCC

HARBOR ISLAND SPA: WEIGHT LOSS GUARANTEED

ONE SPA WEEK FREE!

arj or
an spa 1-800-SPA-SLIM

"")Pa'k ""' ALSO AVAILABLE 8 DAY/7 NITE SPA PACKAGE

)

FOR WOMEN

Certified Speech Pathologist

642-5170

ON BISCAYNE BAY BETWEEN MIAMI & MIAMI BEACH

GOING TO THE AIRPORT?
BUSINESS OR VACATION

Give today

Your donation to the Association for Retarded Citizens will help
improve the life of a child or adult with mental
retardation — and support research into treatment and
prevention of the condition in others.

Jewish Association for Retarded Citizens
17288 W. 12 Mile Rd., Southfield, MI 48076
(313) 557-7650

ik

.

.

r

Start at your front door
avoid the hassle at the
airport and getting there!

ROYAL CAB

358-2400

Help build thearc

Call us now for special
rates with this ad

Association for Retarded Citizens

WISHING YOU AND YOURS
A VERY HAPPY AND HEALTHY
PASSOVER

Susannah Heschel grew up in a home that allowed for equality between
the sexes.

Feminist Seeks Equality
For Women In Judaism

JUDY MARX

GLASSMAN OLDS/SAAB

28000 Telegraph

Southfield

354-3300

JEWISH TELEVISION
MAGAZINE

Celebrates
PASSOVER

Oak Park, Southfield
Lathrup Village,
West Bloomfield

MONDAYS
4:30 P.M.
and
WEDNESDAYS
7:30 P.M.

SUNDAYS
4 P.M.
and
TUESDAYS
B P.M.

WEDNESDAYS
APRIL 6 and 20

CONTINENTAL

METROVISION

BOOTH COMMUNICATIONS

CABLE TU 11

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1988

Farmington,
Farmington Hills,
Novi

1 2:30 P.M.

CABLE TU 11

Brought to you by the Jewish Welfare Federation

62

NEW VIEWING AREA!

Beverly Hills,
Birmingham,Bingham Farms,
Franklin Village

CABLE TU 12

Produced by the Council of Jewish Federations

Special to The Jewish News

S

usannah Heschel does

not like to talk about
women's roles within
Judaism, a curious statement
from someone who has writ-
ten a book on being a Jewish
feminist.
"No one ever talks about
`men's roles,' " she explains.
"Any discussion that tries to
define women's roles
automatically puts us in a
marginal position."
Last week Heschel was in
Michigan to deliver a lecture
at Adat Shalom Synagogue
and to address audiences in
Ann Arbor.
The daughter of Conser-
vative Jewish theologian
Abraham Joshua Heschel,
she grew up in a home en-
vironment that welcomed
equality among the sexes.
"Both my parents were very
pious, but at the same time
they were involved in leftist
political issues. They took a
stand on civil rights. There
were a lot of people who
weren't happy that my father
went to march in Selma."
An only child, Heschel
recalls "making kiddush and
leading the Birkot Hamazon
(Blessing After the Meal) for
company. I didn't know then
that it was forbidden for a girl
to do that."
However, very early
Heschel began to question
why she was looked at dif-
ferently outside her home.

"When we visited my father's
Chasidic family, I had to re-
main in the kitchen and help
the women prepare the food,
while the boys and men
gathered around my uncle,
the rebbe, in the living room.
I didn't like the Orthodox day
school .I attended in New York
City because the adults there
were so rigid. They would
scream, and they couldn't
handle questions. My parents
were very gentle people. It
had never been like that for
me at home, and so as a yOung
child I was made aware of con-
tradictions within Judaism."
Her experience at a private,
secular prep school was no
more welcoming. "Despite the
fact that a lot of the students
and teachers were Jewish,
they were uncomfortable with
me because I was more obser-
vant than they were. I kept
kosher."
Heschel was pleased with
her decision to attend Trini-
ty College, where she receiv-
ed a B.A. degree in religion in
1973. "I found a lot of warmth
there. Because it was called
Trinity College, the Jewish
students felt the need to
strongly assert their
Jewishness. I couldn't have
survived at a place like
Brandeis with a name like
Heschel."

A master's degree in
theology and church history
from- Harvard Divinity School
followed. ribday Heschel is a
doctoral candidate at the
University of Pennsylvania,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan