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March 25, 1988 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I CLOSE-UP I

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I

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ANTIQUE • VINTAGE • CONTEMPORARY

Nachas With Dukakis

Continued from Page 26

of famous Jews Albert Ein-
stein, Karl Marx and Sig-
mund Freud — were burned.
It was the beginning of bla-
tant anti-Semitism .in Nazi
Germany, and an event that
always bothered Mrs. Duka-
kis' parents.
"My parents returned to
America in 1934 with a
strong story to tell," she said.
"Neither one thought the
book burning would go very
far. Jews were so much a part
of that German society. They
were leaders in the intellec-
tual Jewish community. They
were professors. All of the
best musicians were Jews."
Her father was a violinist
who recently retired from the
Boston Symphony. Her late
mother was a social worker.
Mrs. Dukakis has served on
former President Jimmy Car-
ter's Commission on the Hol-

R`?"
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AMER
CANCER
SOCIETY

MIKE DUKAKIS FOR PRESIDENT

• Strong
Civil
Rights
Record

• Nationally
Recognized
Crime-
Fighter

• Committed
to a Safe,
Secure Israel

• Wife (Kitty)
Active in
Hadassah, ADL

JACK FAXON
State Senator
Farmington Hills

MAXINE BERMAN
State Representative
Southfield

LILLIAN JAFFE OAKS
County Commissioner
Oak Park

ANNETTA MILLER
Member
State School Board

DOUGLAS ROSS
Director
MI Department of Commerce

JOSEPH FORBES
Former Majority Floor Leader

Vote in the Democratic Caucuses
Saturday, March 26

Open to All Registered Voters
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For Transportation or Directions to Caucus Sites

Call (313) 352-7369 or (313) 961-6311

Paid for by Oakland County Friends Of Dukakis and Authorized by 1 be Dukakis for President Committee, lite.

ocaust and the United States
Holocaust Commission. She
also serves on the New
England Anti-Defamation
League and has toured con-
centration camps and memo-
rials in Poland, the Soviet
Union, Denmark and Israel.
As first lady of Massachu-
setts, she fights for human
rights. She organized a task
force on Cambodian children,
which led to two missions to
refugee camps in Thailand.
Her latest concern is fund
raising for a National Holo-
caust Memorial, to be built in
Washington, D.C.
If she is the country's next
first lady, Mrs. Dukakis
would be the first Jew living
in the White House.
That, she-said, would bring
"Nachas with Dukakis" and
the first seder there as
well. 111

I COMMENT I

Levin's Letter: Naivete
With Best Of Intentions

MORRIS J. AMITAY

I

t was a classic "man bites
dog" story: 30 U.S. sen-
ators writing a letter
widely interpreted as being
critical of Israel. And, predic-
tably, the usual gaggle of
critics were quick to applaud
this unique occurrence and
exaggerate its significance.
Notwithstanding the pre-
ponderance of positive
statements in the letter, the
media pounced on the
"dismay" expressed by the
senators over Prime Minister
Shamir's refusal to publicly
announce, in advance of any
negotiations, that Israel
should give up territory for
peace. It should also have
been predictable that the
reaction to the letter from
pro-Israel activists would
cause additional dismay to
the signers of the letter.
Some of the senators who
signed the letter were ob-
viously impressed by the
religious affiliation of the let-
ter's originator, Sen. Carl
Levin of Michigan, and three
other signers, Senators
Boschwitz, Lautenberg and
Metzenbaum.
In hindsight, most of the
signers now question the
wisdom and timing of having
sent such a message. In fact,
in its aftermath, not a single
signer would agree to a
televised debate with Sen.
Arlen Specter of Penn-
sylvania who had refused to
sign the letter. Although
Specter is regarded as one of
the brightest members of the

Senate, it should not have
taken a genius to forsee the
negative effect of having the
letter on the front page of the
New York Times a day before
Shamir arrived in this coun-
try for his talks with the ad-
ministration on the Shultz
peace plan.
With the best of intentions,
the letter injected 30
American senators directly
into the internal politics of a
fellow democracy and
displayed a degree of naivete
of the realities of the Middle
East and the significance of
the Camp David Accords.
The Camp David Accords,
which all the senators had
supported, wisely dictated an
interim period of five years in
which intentions could be,
divined and human contact
developed prior to final agree-
ment over the disposition of
the territories. The letter,
however, not only short cir-
cuited the Camp David pro-
cess, it cut the ground out
from under Israel's eventual
negotiating position in direct
talks with Jordan and
Palestinian representatives.
It is important to note that
Shamir, as the democratical-
ly elected head of his govern-
ment, spoke for Israel.
The motivation behind the
letter's author, Sen. Carl
Levin, was to try to change a
status quo he regarded as in-
tolerable, and also provide
support for Israeli Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres. But
change for the sake of change
without knowing where it
will lead can be dangerous.

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