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March 19, 1988 - Image 90

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Continued from preceding page

translate the novel Marien-
bad. Three more works
followed in quick succession:
two novels, The Nightingale
and In the Storm, and a col-
lection of children's holiday
stories.
Her current project, The
Bloody Hoax, presented a dif-
ficult set of problems from the
first. It was not part of the 28
volumes of Sholem Alei-
chem's work that had been
published in Yiddish in the
United States. In fact, it had
only been published once, in
Poland.
"Sometimes you just cannot
find an explanation for these
things:' says Shevrin. "There
was just one copy in existence
and . I located it in the ar-
chives at the (YIVO) Yiddish
Institute in New York City.
The pages are beginning to
disintegrate so it does not
circulate.
"Fortunately, it had been
copied on microfilm and I
have been working with that.
But the condition was so bad
that it took me an entire sum-
mer just to get through a first
reading of it," she adds with
amazement.
Now, after 2 1/2 years of work
during which she has pro-
duced about 250 pages of
translated text, Shevrin is
studying the chances of the
book's financial success. She
worries about the length of
the story. Longer novels are
not always financially attrac-
tive to publishing companies
and may discourage prospec-
tive readers. "It's not just a
Jewish audience that you
need, but a Jewish, intellec-
tual, literary audience. I may
have to go with a university
press for this one:' she says.
She acknowledges that her
workday journeys into the
Jewish world that Sholem
Aleichem so richly illumi-
nated can be lonely.
Still, "I feel that this is
where I have something im-
portant to contribute," she
says of the Yiddish career
which becaipe her full-time
vocation five years ago. "You
get used to the nature of the
work. Getting the daily mail,
eating lunch — now those are
the big prizes," she says
laughing. ❑

Israel Day
Hears Kraar

Martin S. Kraar, executive
vice president, of the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Detroit,
will deliver the keynote ad-
dress for the fourth annual
Israel Conference Day March
27.
Kraar wil speak on "Ameri-
can Jewry and Israel: Balanc-

ing Rights, Obligations and
Demands."
The conference, which is
free and open to students and
the general public, will begin
at 10 a.m. at the Rackham
building, 915 E. Washington
St. in Ann Arbor. Registra-
tion will begin at 9:30 a.m.
Day care will be available.
Complimentary lunch and re-
freshments will be served.
Drawing upon Israeli,
American and local scholars,
Israel Conference Day will of-
fer presentations and discus-
sions on "Prospects for Peace,"
"Diaspora/Israeli Relations;'
"Does Israel Need a Constitu-
tion?" "Jewish Religious Ex-
tremism in Israeli Society,"
"Ashken.azi/Sephardi Rela-
tions," "Identity Crisis of the
Sabra," "Modern Israeli
Literature" and "Jews of
Morocco and Yemen: An Eth-
nic Celebration."

Feminist Critique
Of Religion

Susannah Heschel will
speak on "Why God is a He:
A Feminist Critique of Re-
ligion," 8 p.m. Wednesday, at
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
She will also speak at noon,
in 234 West Engineering, on
"Anti-Judaism in Christian
Feminist Theology and in
Feminist Theory"
At 4 p.m. in 3050 Frieze
Building, she wil speak on
"Modern Jews and Ancient
Christians: Views of Jesus in
Modern Jewish Thought."

Zionist Day
Is Scheduled

"Proud to be a Zionist Day"
will be sponsored Thursday
by 'agar and AZYF. Litera-
ture and balloons wil be
available in the Fishbowl.
At 6 p.m., Ephraim Poker,
shaliach and Midwest repre-
sentative of the World Ex-
ecutive of Betar, will speak on
the current situation in the
Mideast.

11

'1 LOCAL NEWS

One-Woman
Play At Temple

The adult education com-
mittee of Temple Israel in-
vites the community to a one-
act, one-woman play featur-
ing Evelyn Orbach at 8 p.m.
Monday at the temple.
The play, entitled Mercy,
depicts the struggle of one
woman in colonial America
for the individual rights and
freedoms of all Americans.
The presentation is made
possible by a grant from the
Michigan Council for the

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