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March 11, 1988 - Image 95

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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gle," he explains, "people
can contribute as much to
society as anybody through
their careers and deeds.
"For myself coming to
Israel," he adds, "was a
statement that I want to be
part of the Jewish continum
and help build the Jewish
State. And an important
part of that involves get-
ting married and having
children. I also sacrificed
some of my career and ma-
terial prospects by coming to
Israel and these energies I
put into my friendships!'
Living in the southern Je-
rusalem neighborhood of
Talpiot, Moshe mixes in a
large circle of Anglo-Saxon
new immigrants who main-
ly live nearby or in adjoin-
ing districts like Baka and
the German Colony. He has
Israeli friends too, and now
a new set of friends from his
recently completed 120 days
army service.
"Social life here for sin-
gles is no different from the
States," he observes. "Al-
though as well as parties,
cultural events and eating
out, there is perhaps a little
more emphasis on outdoor
activities like hiking and
camping. Also Israelis are
very warm and supportive
and I am uncle to a lot of
families. The openness of
society here has been impor-
tant in helping me adjust to
my new home?'
Adeena Ascher always felt
that her Jewish identity was
stronger than her American
identity. "I guess for most
American Jews it's the other
way around," she says.
"Consequently I felt that I
wanted to live in a country
where my culture was domi-
nant and the Jews are not a
minority?'
Adeena is the daughter of
Albert and the late Penina
Ascher. She grew up in Oak
Park where her father and
brother Daniel still live.
Albert Ascher is executive
director of the Jewish Voca-
tional Service. Adeena came
to Israel in 1978 and enroll-
ed at the Hebrew Universi-

ty where she was graduated
in biology before taking a
professional retraining pro-
gram to become a computer
programmer. She now works
as a computer programmer
for the Joint Distribution
Committee.
Adeena attributes her
strong desire to live in Israel
to the solid Jewish educa-
tion and background that
her parents gave her. She
has no regrets about her
move to Israel, except over
the financial sacrifices in-
volved, and in particullar
rising rental prices have
meant that she has had to
move home many times in
recent years and this has
been hard to take. But
otherwise she finds Israel
very satisfying. Currently
she lives in Jerusalem's Ger-
many Colony.
She feels that the singles
social scene is more vibrant
in Israel than back in Amer-
ica where people of her own
age are more concerned
with their careers and mak-
ing money than with their
friendships, whereas in
Israel priorities are the
other way around. Israeli
society is also much more in-
formal, she says, and that
makes it simpler for people
to get together. Adenna em-/
phasises, however, that she
very much enjoys her work
and derives a great deal of
professional satisfaction •
from it.
She also has a wide cir-
cle of friends who include
both Israelis and fellow
American new immigrants.
Though she agrees that Is-
rael is a much more family
oriented society than
America, as a single she
still feels very much in-
volved and part of society.
Since coming to Israel
she has become an Orthodox
Jew, but she is quick to
point out that she belongs to
a synagogue where most
members are liberals and
left wingers, although Orth-
odox. As a left winger she
is perturbed by the distur-
bances in the West Bank
and Gaza. "The riots are

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